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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


London, Thursday, September 29, 1994 



No. 34,7U(> 


800 DEAD AT SEA 

Ferry Tragedy Remains a Puzzle 



Why Did Well-Kept’ Vessel Sink in Baltic? 


A survivor of the sinking of the ferry Estonia after his arrival Wednesday in Turku, Finland, on a rescue helicopter. 




A Ruling Party Leader Is Slain in Mexico 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dapaicha 

MEXICO CITY —The secretary-gen- 
eral of Mexico’s ruling party, Jose Fran- 
cisco Ruiz Massieu, was assassinated 
Wednesday in another blow to the coun- 
try's attempt to gain an image of stabil- 
ity. 

A young man was arrested at the scene 
but offi c ial s gave no identity or motive. 

The titling shocked officials who are 
■t rill recovering from the March 23 assas- 
sination of the ruling party presidential 
candidate, Luis Donaldo Colosio Mur- 
rieta, who was shot at a Tijuana cam- 
paign rally. His successor. Ernesto Ze- 


dillo. won the Aug. 21 presidential 
election and takes power Dec. 1. 

Mexico had been shaken this year not 
only by Mr. Colosio's killing and the 
New Year’s uprising by rebels in south- 
ern Mexico, but also by a wave of kid- 
nappings of businessmen and narcotics- 
related violence. 

Deputy Attorney Genera] Mario Ruiz 
Massieu, the slain man’s brother, an- 
nounced the death. He is in charge of 
prosecuting drug traffickers for the fed- 
eral attorney general's office. 

Dr. Felipe Maldonado Campos, direc- 
tor of the Hospital Espahol where Lhe 


victim was taken after the 9:30 A.M. 
shooting, said at a news conference that 
a bullet entered the lower part of Mr. 
Ruiz Massieu's neck and caused massive 
internal injuries and bleeding. 

Mr. Ruiz Massieu. 48, was shot while 
leaving a breakfast banquet at a down- 
town note! for newly elected Congress 
members from his Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party. 

The party’s president, Ignacio Pi- 
chardo Pagaza, said a man approached 
Mr. Ruiz Massieu's car and shot him 

See MEXICO, Page 6 


EU Court Rules Pensions 
Are Owed to Part-Timers 


By Tom Buerkle 

international Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — Europe’s part-time 
workers arc entitled to participate in com- 
pany pension plans, the European Court 
of Justice ruled Wednesday in a decision 
that could extend broad benefits to as 
many as 20 million workers. Employers 
wanted that could add huge costs to busi- 
ness and price part-timers out of their jobs. 

Separately, the court also _ ruled that 
companies could equalize pension benefits 
for men and women by requiring women 
to retire later, a decision that insurance 
industry experts said was very likely to 
accelerate tbe tread toward a common 
retirement age of 55. 


But the court said women could not 
have their pension benefits downgraded 
retroactively, which industry experts said 
could cost employers in Britain alone £2 
billion to £3 billion (S3.2 billion to $4.8 
billion). 

The decisions were among six landmark 
rulings handed down by the Luxembourg- 
based court that will define bow employers 
must achieve equality in pensions for men 
and women. Employers called the rulings 
blindingly complex. 

The two-rulings on behalf of two Dutch 
part-time workers carried by far the big- 
gest implications. The court said the wom- 
en were entitled to participate in their 

See PENSIONS, Page 11 



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START-2 Accord 
To Be Speeded 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President 
Bill Clinton and President Boris N. 
Yeltsin of Russia agreed Wednesday 
to speed up the dismantling of the 
nuclear arsenals of both nations. 

The two leaders also signed agree- 
ments pledging closer economic and 
security cooperation. 

Mr. Clinton said that he and Mr. 
Yeltsin had agreed to speed up the 
timetable of the START-2 agreement 
reached in 1 993, which calls for reduc- 
ing long-range nuclear warheads to 
3,000-3,500 by year 2003. Mr. Clinton 
said that the two countries would be- 
gin to dismantle tbe warheads as soon 
as that agr eement is ratified “instead 
of taking the nine years allowed.'’ 


Book Review 
Bridge 

Crossword 

Weather 


Page 8. 
Page 8, 
Page 17. 
Page 17. 


By Erik Ipsen 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — At the end of a long 
and sorrowful day, the owners of a Baltic 
Sea ferry that ■iank off Finland on Wednes- 
day, killing more than 800 people, de- 
fended the vessel's seaworthiness but were 
unable to offer an immediate explanation 
for the worst maritime disaster in Europe 
since World War n. 

Of the 964 passengers and crew mem- 
bers on the Estonia, 141 had been rescued 
by Wednesday night. Forty-two bodies 
had been recovered, and the others were 
presumed dead. 

An official of Estline. a joint Swedish- 
Estonian company that operated the ferry. 

Survivors Tefl 
Of Fleeing — 
There Was No 
Time to Think 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dapatcha 

STOCKHOLM — “We are sinking,” 
the feriy Estonia radioed in its final SOS, 
and then: “The engines have stopped!" 

Hundreds of passengers had no time to 
save themselves from the deadly cold wa- 
ters of the Baltic Sea. 

An account of the ship’s final minutes 
was compiled from survivors’ initial ac- 
counts and various news reports: 

At 7 PJVf. local time (1700 GMT), the 
■ 14-year-Q|d ferry leaves the dock in -Tal- 
linn, the Estonian capital, bound for 
Stockholm with nearly 1,000 people on 
board. Most of tbe passengers are Swedes, 
many aboard for the pleasure of its smor- 
gasbord, its indoor pool and the live music 
and dancing at the Baltic Bar. 

About an hour and a half later, the 
15,600-ton ferry runs into heavy weather. 
The band soon stops playing, because the 
ship is swaying heavily in 6-meter (nearly 
20-foot) waves. 

Many of the passengers retire, some to 
cabins nine decks below tbe bridge, to 
sleep out the rest of the 370-kilometer 
(230-mile) journey. 

The first signs of trouble come about 5*4 
hours after departure. An engineer, Henrik 
Sillaste, notices on closed-circuit television 
that water is coming in from a forward 
door. He and fellow engine room workers 
think it is rain water and turn on bilge 
pumps. 

Some survivors say later that they heard 
a loud crashing sound, perhaps a big wave 
hitting the ship. The ship sends its first 
Mayday message. 

About 15 minutes later, the pumps are 
overwhelmed. The 28 trucks, two buses 
and several cars in the hold are inundated. 
The 157-meter ferry begins listing to port 
from the weight of the water. 

“The water reached my knees,” said Mr. 
Sillaste. 


which foundered on a crossing from ihe 
Estonian capital of Tallinn to Stockholm, 
promised to find “tbe technical reason for 
this terrible castastrophe." The official ac- 
knowledged that the Estonia had left Tal- 
linn with winds forecast to be 65 kilome- 
ters an hour (40 miles an hour). 

“O.K., this is stormy weather, but nor- 
mally this would be no problem for the 
Estonia," said Carl-Gustaf Ackerhielm, 
Lhe director of traffic for Estline. He add- 
ed, “She has sailed in much worse weather 
than this.” 

Initial speculation focused on possibly 
defective seals on a door on the car declc, 
but maritime officials in Sweden appeared 
to dismiss this possibility. One of them 


said that two Swedish inspectors had con- 
cluded that the Estonia was “a well-kcr; 
ship." 

Rescue officials broke off a huge air ar - 
sea search for more survivors Wcdnesd: 
evening as darkness fell, and they plans:.- - 
to resume Thursday morning. 

A crew f member of the ferry said th..: 
while it was in the middle of the Baltic Sc. . 
water started pouring through the iron: 
cargo door. The ferry sank quickly. 

A port spokesman in Tallinn said the 
Estonia's main engines appeared to hav. 
cut out, adding: “My understanding is th;r. 
for some reason lhe main engines stopped. 

See FERRY, Page 6 



In service since 1980, the German-built Estonia could 
carry a maximum of 2,000 passengers and 460 cars. File 
photo shows opened forward loading door of the 515- 
Bridge deck foot-long (157-meter) ferry. 


Forward 

loading 

door 


V/J.A 


Rear 

loading 

door 

X 



People dash up stairs to the decks where 
lifeboats are stored. For those on the lower 
decks, the climb is arduous. The weak and 
elderly are left behind. 

At about 1 :55 A.M. local time, the Esto- 
nia is listing 30 degrees off center, and two 
of the ship’s four engines shut off. Mr. 
Sillaste and his two comrades abandon the 
engine room, climbing Tor their lives up a 
shaft 

Neeme Kaik, an Estonian, is on an up- 
per deck, where crew members are helping 
people into lifeboats. “1 grabbed a life 
jacket myself,” he said, “and then the boat 
fell on its left side completely, with the 
smokestack hitting the water.” 

At 2 A JVL the ship sinks, stern-first in 
waters more than 60 meters deep. Forty 
covered lifeboats make it into the turbu- 
lent 12-degree centigrade (54-degree Fahr- 
enheit) water. 

Nearly seven hours after the sinking, the 
first survivor arrives by helicopter at Han- 
ko, on the Finnish coast A few hours later, 
bruised, dazed and shocked, several 
emerge from hospital emergency rooms to 
rallc- 


[nk-miii-rn.il Htf.ild Tn unu 


There was no time to think," said a 
deck hand. Stiver Linde. ”1 just ran. ran. 
ran. I just don’t understand it. It was a very 
good ship, a beautiful liner." 

The survivors said they had been treated 
for hypothermia and water inhalation. 
One patient had a body temperature of 
only 26 degrees centigrad'e (79 Fahrenheit) 
when rescued. 

“The noise woke me up, and I could fee! 
the ship was listing,” said Einar Kukk, 32. 
a second mate who was on board the ship 
for trai ni ng. T ran up on deck, put on a life 
vest and gave vests to others. Then I began 

See SOS, Page 6 

Battle S»a Tragedy 

Roll-on, rod-off ships like the Estonia 
are inherently unstable, experts say. 
Swedes were stunned by lhe deaths of 
hundreds of their compatriots. 

Cheap shopping has attracred Swedes 
to Estonia since the Soviet collapse. 
Page 6 


After Ames, Congress Rethinks the CIA 


By Tim Weiner 

New York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — Having concluded 
that the Central Intelligence Agency can- 
not ably chan its course in the post-Cold 
War world. Congress is creating an inde- 
pendent commission lo rethink the agen- 
cy's role and review its continued existence 
in its present form. 

The new commission, being formed de- 
spite active opposition by the CIA’s lead- 
ers and passive resistance from the White 
House, wil] have a broad mandate, extend- 
ing to the very existence of the CIA and the 
nation’s 1 1 other military and civilian in- 
telligence agencies. 

In effect. Congress is forcing the CIA to 


become something like a company under- 
going a court-supervised bankruptcy reor- 
ganization. 

“The place just needs a total overhaul,” 
said Senator Arlen Specter, a Pennsylvania 
Republican who has served six years on 
the Senate Select Committee on Intelli- 
gence and will be its senior Republican in 
January. 

The CIA’s budget, which is secret, has 
been estimated at $3 billion a year: by 
comparison, the Stale Department's is 
about $2 billion. 

The 17-member commission was con- 
ceived by Senator John Warner of Virgin- 
ia, now the commi Wee's senior Republican. 1 
It will be led by former Defense Secretary 


Les Aspin, who heads the president's For- 
eign Intelligence Advisory Board, tradi- 
tionally an obscure panel.’ Nine members 
will be named by the president, eight bv 
Congress. 

“We have got to determine, whether 
there is at the CIA a cultural isolation from 
the way business is conducted in the Unit- 
ed States and the United States govern- 
ment,” Senator Warner said. He said he 
was confident that the commission would 
not “slash and burn.” 

Others in Congress and at the CIA are 
not so sure. Even before the arrest of 
Aldrich H. Ames, the mole for Moscow 

See CIA, Page 6 


India Travelers Could Face Quarantine 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

Travelers arriving from India with a 
fever, chills, chest pains or a cough could 
face several days in an isolation room 
under international plague regulations, 
the World Health Organization warned 
Wednesday. 

The warning came as cases of plague 
multiplied across India and countries 
around the world stepped up screening 
of passengers at ports and airports. 

The organization said it had reminded 
the Indian government and other nations 
that people leaving or arriving from an 
epidemic zone can legally be detained for 
up to six days, the incubation period of 
plague. 


_ Experts said that it would be up to 
airport health authorities to decide 
whether symptoms were serious enough 
to warrant a suspected victim’s being 
isolated. They said criteria at different 
airports would not always be the same. 
But doctors have authority to isolate 
passengers under international regula- 
tions signed by most of the world’s gov- 
ernments. 

Many governments axe screening pas- 
sengers arriving from India. Saudi Ara- 
bia, Kuwait and Qatar, which have large 
Indian immigrant populations, indefi- 
nitely suspended flights to and from In- 
dia on Wednesday. Saudi Arabia or- 
dered an Air India Boeing 747 bound for 
Jidda to turn back to Bombay with 245 


passengers after the ban went into effect. 
Lebanon barred Indian nationals from 
entering the country. 

Despite the tightened measures at air- 
ports, WHO said it was standing by an 
earlier recommendation that travelers 
need not delay plans to visit India. 

WHO said gpvenunems do not have 
international regulations 
‘b® 1 P^eep from 
India be vaccinated against the plagT 
as Russia did on Tuesday. A WHri 
spokesman said the vaedne/an attenuat 
ed form of plague, should be given oniv 
to doctors, nurses and laboratory lechS ■ 

See PLAGUE, Page 6 


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Page 2 


EXTERJNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


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Unions’ Strike Call Puts Berlusconi’s Austerity Budget to Test 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 

ROME — The government of 
Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi 
faced a lest of wills with the labor 
movement on Wednesday after 
union leaders called a general strike 
to protest an austerity budget they 
depicted as hitting the old and the 
sick. 

The four-hour stoppage, set for 
Oct. 14, reflected a central dilemma 
for Mr. Berlusconi: To restore inter- 
national confidence in the Italian 
economy he needs to show resolve in 
cutting back the country's vast over- 
spending; but to meet electoral 
pledges that there would be no fiscal 
punishment for economic change, he 
needs to persuade Italians that the 
budget is fair. 

Tne budget, which still faces a 
rough ride in Parliament, is designed 


to slice about $30 billion off Italy’s 
budget deficit so as to hold it at the 
equivalent of $92 billion, or, 9 per- 
cent of the total value of Italy's annu- 
al economic output. 

For the past two years, Italy has 
been struggling in vain to counter the 
legacy of the free-spending 1 980s and 
to reduce the cost of generous social 
programs. 


had previously described the budget 
as "tough but fair." 

The view was not shared by the 
labor unions. "This budget in iniqui- 
♦ — and inefficient,” said Sergio 


tous 


Cofferati, head of one large labor 
union, “It is iniquitous because it hits 
the less well-off and inefficient be- 
cause it will not be able to support 
economic growth." 


But the figures also highlight the 
first real challenge to Mb'. Berlus- 
coni’s ability to manage Italy's heavi- 
ly indebted economy after campaign- 
ing for office in part on his 
credentials as a successful entrepre- 
neur. 


Another union leader. Sergio 
d’Antoni, said: “This unfair budget 
will hit the weakest hardest.” 


Mr. Berlusconi's fractious coali- 
tion announced agreement on the 
budget after an eight-hour session 
ending at 6 A.M. on Wednesday. M I 
think we worked well.” he said! He 


A key issue in the budget negotia- 
tion has been Italy's generous but 
expensive pension system, where the 
government has sought to save $3.3 
billion by increasing the pensionable 
age and trimming benefits sucb as 
automatic pension increases to 
match inflation. 

The authorities have sought to 


save a further $4 billion in another 
sensitive area — health care — by 
closing some small hospitals and in- 
creasing the cost to patients of the 
country's national health system. 

Wildcat protests against the cost- 
cutting were reported in many parts 
of Italy, and strikers blocked off 
some highways to traffic. 

The point of the general strike next 
month is to muster enough support 
to show Mr. Berlusconi and his coali- 
tion partners that they will lose polit- 
ical support by pursuing the deficit 
cuts. 


berto Bossi, has assailed what be calls 
attempts by the prime minister to 
stack the state broadcasting compa- 
ny's three channels with political ap- 
pointees so as to complement Mr. 
Berlusconi’s ownership of Italy's 
main commercial networks. 


The three-party coalition, made up 
of Mr. Berlusconi's Forza Italia par- 
ty, the neo-Fascist National Alliance 
and the federalist Northern League, 
has displayed remarkable unity so far 
over the budget debate, but r emains 
divided on other issues. 

The Northern League leader, Um- 


Under the political system that 
prevailed before Mr. Berlsu corn’s 
rise to power in elections in Match, 
editorial control of the three state 
networks was routinely parceled out 
between the dominant Christian 
Democrats, the Socialists and the 
former Communists. 


But appointments to key program- 
ming positions since then have 
drawn protests from Mr. Berlus- 
coni’s critics and from journalists at 
the state-run channels that the prime 
minister is seeking to dominate all 
broadcasting. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Shevardnadze Appears Set to Stay On 


TBILISI, Georgia (Reuters) — Georgia's Parliament post- 
poned its session wednesda; 


ay amid indications that a crisis bver 


pUUwVK lw KNIVU yt wiuiwvttj ^ 

the threat by the bead of state. Eduard A. Shevardnadze, toresgn 
; defused. 


was being -.... 

The parliamentary press center said the legislature would meet 
on Thursday and would discuss only scheduled matters. This 

I . _ ■ .1 . ,L. moirtritV 


appeared to indicate that the parliamentary majority, 'Much 
supports Mr. Shevardnadze, baa pc 



persuaded the forma- Soviet 

foreign minister to remain in office. Mr. Shevardnadze, fed up 
with repeated opposition calls for his resignation, said Tuesday 
that he would decide overnight whether to step down. 

Opposition deputies blamed him for militar y and economic 
defeats. A year after ago, he and his troops surrendered the Black 
Sea city of Sukhumi, the last government stronghold in A b khazia, 
to regional secessionists who now control the province. 




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Attack on Khmer Rouge Kidnappers 


KAMPOT, Cambodia (Reuters) — The Cambodian Army has 


launched a major attack on a mountain base where Khmeplooge 


fro 

thi 

qu: 

am 

the 

fie: 


France Is Accused 
Of Violating Ban 
On Rwanda Arms 


guerrillas have been holding three Western hostages since Ji 
officers and soldiers said Wednesday. 

Special forces units reached the sprawling village base Saturday 
but were repulsed by the guerrillas, who have apparently moved 


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Agence Francc-Presse 

NAIROBI — The French se- 
cret service supplied weapons 
and ammunition to the Rwan- 
da’s Hutu-led armed forces well 
afta the genocide of Tutsis bad 
begun, in violation of an arms 
embargo cm the African state, 
according to a report issued 
Thursday. 

The publication by the Lon- 
don-based organization Africa 
Rights was sharply critical of 
the attitude of the international 
community and the United Na- 
tions on the Rwanda crisis, but 
singled out Paris. 

The French secret service, the 
DGSE, and the French Minis- 
try of Cooperation "were most 
active in supporting the interim 
government” set up afta Presi- 
dent Juvfcnal Habyarimana was 
killed when his aircraft was 
fired on and crashed April 6. 

The publication said arms 
supplies acquired by the DGSE 
“certainly arrived in Rwanda as 
late as May" 



Accord Ends 
The 4-Month 


ibeir captives to nearby caves, a sergeant who was wounded in the 
attack said. He said 6,000 ; 


Rail Strike 
In Britain 


government soldiers were taking pan in 

the continuing assault 

The Khmer Rouge guerrillas are holding Mark Slater, 28. from 
Britain; lean- Michel Braquet, 27. from France, and David Wil- 
son. 29, from Australia, on Vine Mountain, 150 kilometers (95 
miles) south of Phnom Penh. They are also holding three ethnic 
Vietnamese and an unknown number of Cambodians seized along 
with the Westerners in a July 26 train ambush in which 13 people 
were killed. 


Rebels Kill 14 Sri Lankan Troops 


Reuters 

LONDON — A four-month 
rail dispute, Britain's worst 
strike in a decade, ended 
Wednesday when unions and 
management worked out a pay 
deal afta 60 hours of talks. 


COLOMBO (AP) — Tamil rebels killed 14 soldiers in eastern 
Sri Lanka on Wednesday, two weeks before a government team 


plans to hold peace talks with the insurgents, officials said. 

‘ d and killed Wednesday n 


Both sides claimed success, 
with the employer. Rail track, 
calling the* solution a “victoiy 
for common sense.” 


Thirteen soldiers were ambushed and killed Wednesday morn- 
ing in Tharakulam, 180 kilometers (1 10 miles) east of Colombo, 
and another soldier was killed in an attack Tuesday night, said 
Brigadier Gemunu Kulatimga, the militar y spokesman. No rebel 
casualties were immediately reported. •• . 

A four-member team of government officials is to-writ the 
rebel-held northern town of Jaffna on Oct. 13 and 14 for the first 
peace talks in the 1 1-year insurrection since June 1990. 


JnM Rohmer Agcacc Frmct-Piox 


Prisoners guarded by Rwanda Patriotic Front troops marching toward a river to fill their containers with water. 


The government expressed 
relief at the end of the standoff, 
which caused 19 days of almost 
total shutdown of the rail net- 
work. The strike brought misery 
to millions of commuters ana 
losses to the railroad and to 
British industry of about £500 
million ($790 million). 


Correction 


A Bloomberg Business News dispatch about Sod6t6 Gtnfrrale 


in Wednesday's editions, and a headline oh the article, incorrectly 
characterized c 


co mm ents by Marc Vienot, the French bank's 
chairman. Mr. Vienot actually said, "1994 net profit will not be 
Iowa than 1993, but I can't say how much it will be." 


Vr.l-i-" 


r Rwandan Refugee Camps in Grip of Crime Wave 


By Keith B. Richburg 

Washington Post Service 

GOMA, Zaire — Weekly reports on 


security in the Rwandan refugee carnjw 


here have come to read more like 
police log in a crime-infested city neigh- 
borhood, which is what the camps have 
become. 

One day a Zairian soldier is hacked to 
death by a mob of refugees afta he 
attempts to extort money. The next day, 
refugees set up a barricade on the road 
outside a camp and attack passing cars 
with stones, sucks and grenades. A refu- 
gee is slain because he speaks English 
and a Hutu mob suspects he might be a 
Tutsi infiltrator. 

As cholera, hunger and despair Have 
faded in the camps, and as the foreign 
relief workers have started meeting the 
baric needs, death has taken on a quick- 
er, violent form. 

The bodies still are laid out in the 
morning for collection, but the victims 


now are targets of mob justice, revenge 
killings, campaigns of intimidation and 
control, or just blind rage. 

“Most of the deaths we don't find out 
about.” said Lyndall Sachs, a spokes- 
woman for the UN High Commissioner 
for Refugees, because they occur at 
night after foreigners have left. 

An estimated half-million Rwandans 
were killed during three months of tribal 
slaughter that began in April, and most 
are said to have been members of Rwan- 
da’s Tutsi minority, slain by the hard- 
line Hutu government’s armed forces 
and militias. The Hutu regime was 
ousted in July by the Tutsi-led Rwandan 
Patriotic Front, which now rules the 
country. 

The mounting violence has led the 
UN agency to begin thinking of ways to 
redesign the camps, perhaps by breaking 
the larger ones into smaller units, and by 
coordinating a refugee internal-security 
network. 


But Fran^oise Royer, a Canadian so- 
cial worker at Katale, the largest camp, 
said recently: “It's very difficult in a big 
camp like this to establish security. We 
don’t know how we're going, to pro- 
ceed.” 


ble assistance of those who wanted to go 
home. 


“By any standard this is an 
excellent package,” said James 
Knapp, head of the National 
Union of Rail, Maritime and 
Transport Workers. “We’re sat- 
isfied there is a good balance in 
this deal.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


Florida’s Lure Wanes for Canadians 


i. ’ ■•‘V 
‘i> 1 


She runs a new social service center at 
Katale, aimed primarily at protecting 
women and the elderly, that is spon- 
sored by the international relief agency 
CARE Able-bodied adults and Rwan- 
dan Boy Scouts help the weak and the 
aged collect their food and guard against 
its theft. 


■pie agency suspended its repatriation 
activities altogether after reports sur- 
faced last week that some of Rwanda's 
majority Hutus who did go home were 
being systematically executed by Patri- 
otic Front soldiers. Front officials have 
denied this. 


But most of the violence is more seri- 
ous. Refugees have been hacked to 


death with machetes in the night, simply 


because they were rumored to be consi 
ering returning to Rwanda. 


Those who have returned despite the 
intimidation are mostly refugees shun- 
ning any visible UN assistance. They 
avoid the border-crossing points and in- 
stead traverse the mountains to avoid 
detection. The United Nations estimates 
that more than 200,000 refugees have 
returned since July. 


He claimed the union had 
won a settlement that amount- 
ed to an increase of 3) percent 
over basic pay raLes for its 4.600 
signal workers. The amount 
would increase the wage bill of 
Railtrack, which operates the 
rail infrastructure, by 10 per- 
cent. he said. 


Railtrack said the increase 
amounted to only 3.4 percent. 
HSut ihatrtCwould be fully < 


fully offset 
by productivity gains following 
the restructuring of “outdated 
practices." 


Reprisal killings and intimidation of 
those wanting to leave have become so 
prevalent that the United Nations has 
largely abandoned its earlier, highly visi- 


The UN agency puts Goma’s camp 
population now at about 650,000 and 
says it is distributing food around Goma 
for about 800,000 refugees. There are 
another half-million refugees, mostly 
Hutus. around Bukavu to the south. 


Transport Secretary Brian 
Mawhinney welcomed the 
agreement and said the settle- 
ment amounted to a 25 percent 
raise, which he called “in line 
with the government's overall 
approach to public sector pay.” 


OTTAWA (AFP) — Canadian travel to Florida has taken a 
“substantial downturn," partly because of fears of violence, ac- 
cording to figures made public by the government 
Statistics Canada said a combination of the declining value of 
the Canadian dollar, growing reports of violence against foreign- 
ers and increased health insurance costs had led to the decline. 

The government agency said the number of visits of one night 
or more made by Canadians to Florida during the first three 
months of this year was 827.000, a decline of 26 percent from the 
same quarter last year. The figures confirm a trend that began last 
year. In 1992 Canadians made a record 25 million visits to 
Florida and spent the equivalent of almost $2 billion. 

Greece ordered that private cars be kept out of central Athens 
for a day Thursday to fight smog blanketing the city. The 
Environment Ministry issued the order afta pollution reached 
high levels, choking the city with a thick smog. (Reuters) 

Hungary on Wednesday harmed the sale of powdered paprika at 
markets and outdoor fairs after powder contaminated with lead 
made dozens of people ilL A government official said criminal 
gangs had “enriched" the paprika, a staple of Hungarian cooking, 
with a red anti-corrosive paint called minium, which contains 
massive amounts of lead. (Reuters) 

A strike by about 1,600 Oslo airport personnel grounded most 
domestic and international flights in Norway on Wednesday, 
affecting 30,000 passengers, airline officials said. (Reuters) 


M. ■ 


- J • V I 




• T. 1 

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Wednesday 


STAGE/ENTERTAINMENT 


Reviews from the world's most famous stages appear in the 
Stage/Entertainment pages - from London and New York theater 
to opera to symphony concerts conducted by renowned artists. 
Along with book and movie reviews, this section provides infor- 
mation on current entertainment options all over the world. 

Every Wednesday in the International Herald Tribune. 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



{tribune 


PUSHED WITH THE MW YORK TIMES A NO THE WASHINGTON POST 


Pilots Were Drinking , 
Crash Survivor Says 


The Associated Press 

TOKYO — The pilots of 
a Taiwanese airliner that 
crashed last spring in Japan 
were drinking in ihe passen- 
ger cabin shortly before the 
accident, a survivor said 
Wednesday. 

The survivor, Noriyasu 
Shirai, said he saw the pilots 
joking and drinking behind 
a curtain in a galley' toward 
the front of the China Air- 
lines plane. 

Mr. Shirai was one of sev- 
en people who survived the 
April 26 crash, which killed 
264 people in Japan’s sec- 
ond-worst aviation accident. 


“They were crouched 
down, talking; and laughing 
and hying tohide their faces 
while they were drinking, so 
everyone thought it was 
strange," Mr. Shirai said. 

“When I asked if it was ail 
right for them to be drink- 
ing, the two people I be- 
lieved were pilots hurried to- 


ward the front of the plane," 
he said 

Police investigating the 
accident have said they 
found alcohol in the blood 
of both the pilot and co- 
pilot. 

The pilot had 0.13 milli- 
grams pa milliliter of blood 
while the co-pilot had 0.55 
milligrams, the Aichi Prefect 
police spokesman, Masami 
Hioki, said Wednesday. The 
co-pilot's level exceeded Ja- 
pan's definition of driving 
while drunk — 0.5 milli- 
grams per milliliter. 

The Airbus jet burst into 
flames shortly afta crashing 
in a failed landing attempt at 
Nagoya airport. 

In a preliminary report, 
investigators said the inex- 
perienced co-pilot was flying 
the plane at the time, and 
was struggling to land in the 
wrong mode while the jet's 
computerized controls were 
trying to abandon the land- 
ing and increase altitude. 




2 Killed in Arson Attack in Germany 


Reuters 

BONN — A handicapped 
woman from the forma Yugo- 
slavia and her 11-year-old 
brother died Wednesday in an 
arson attack on a refugee camp 
in northwestern Germany, and 
the police began a search for the 
woman's forma lova. 


burg, 195 kilometers (120 miles) 
north of Herford. where the at- 
tack occurred, the police said 
Rolf H annis ch, spokesman 
for the fedoal prosecutor who 
has taken ova the case, ruled 
out a racist motive in the attack. 
“We have reasons to believe in 
other motives.” he said. 


Two suspects, reportedly 
Turks, woe arrested m Ham- 


The police chief of Bielefeld, 
□ear Herford, said the police 


had set up a dragnet to catch 
the dead woman’s forma lova, 
an ethnic Albanian from the 
Yugoslav province of Kosovo, 
who had threatened the 23- 
year-old woman in the past 
A Herford police spokesman 
said the arsonist apparently 
used fireworks to set off two 25- 
liter (6 J-gaBon) cans filled with 
gasoline in the entrance to one 
of 40 makeshift homes. 


•• ... .. 

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. ; •' , 
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China’s Leader Elevates Allies to Key Posts 


Reuters 


BEUING — The Communist 
Party chief, Jiang Zemin, 
strengthened his position at a 
party conclave that closed 
Wednesday, placing supporters 
in key posts. 

Mr. Jiang's moves were made 
at a secret four-day plenary ses- 
sion oC the Communist Party’s 
Central Committee. 


voted to full membership in the 
21 -member Politburo, the elite 
organ of party power. 

Two Politburo members, Wu 
Bangguo, who is another of Mr. 
Jiang’s prot&g&s, and Jiang 
Chunyun, were given new pow- 
ers as members of the party’s 
Central Committee secretariat, 
Xinhua said 


The official Xinhua press 
■agency said that Huang Ju, a 
prot&gg of Mr. Jiang's and may- 
or of the party chiefs power 
base of Shanghai, had been ele- 


Jiang Zemin, who last year 
assumed the national presiden- 


cy, became party general secre- 
the army crush the 


tary afta _ 

June 1989 Tiananmen student 
protests. 


Jiang Zemin was seem at the 
time as the hand-picked succes- 
sor to Deng Xiaoping, who has 
retired from all his posts but 
remains China’s supreme leader 
despite his advanced age, 90, 
and reported declining health. 

The party reshuffle was ap- 
proved by the ruling Commu- 
nist leadership at the secret con- 
clave in Beijing. - - 

In a shift from theplenums of 
recent years, the fourth plenum 
made politics and party-build- 
ing — rather than economics — 
its focus. 


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A New Momentum 
For Health Reform 

Soaring Costs of Medicaid 
Spur Innovation by States 


> 


By Dan Morgan 

Wtahuigion Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — While 
health reform is dead in Wash- 
ington, it is gaining momen tum 
in many states, signaling that 
fundamental change is under 
way in the nation's health care 
‘system ; 


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President Bill Clinton 
ised this week that the fight for 
a comprehensive federal health 

■ bill was “far, far from over." 
But the president’s ability to 
follow through is uncertain gjv- 

■ en the possibility that Novem- 
_ bcr's midterm elections may 
" produce a more Republican 

Congress. 

Therefore, many observers 
say, change is likely to be driven 
less by what Washington does 
than by the skyrocketing costs 
of caring for the poor under the 
Medicaid program and the tac- 
tics used by health maintenance 
organizations and insurance 
companies to cut medical 


Together, the pressures on 
state budgets and business 
profits are changing medical 
care on a level hardly envi- 
sioned when Mr. Clinton un- 
veiled his proposals last year. 

“States are much closer to the 
needs of the constituents, and 
states see the growth of Medic- 
aid as being [in conflict with] 
other budgetary priorities, such 
as education, roads and wel- 
fare,” said Carl Volpe, a health 
care associate at the National 
Governors Association. 

For state governments, the 
collapse of the effort to pass a 
for < ini.L national health bill this vear is 
1 - IIiaa © certain to add impetus 'to re- 
form efforts, experts said. 

Within hours of the an- 
nouncement Monday that con- 
gressional Democrats were 
abandoning health legislation 
for this year. Governor Mario 
M. Cuomo of New York an- 
nounced plans to expand cover- 
. .. . age to tens of thousands of un- 
insured people in his state, 
using savings obtained by cuts 
in Medicaid. 

On Sept. 15, the Clinton ad- 
ministration authorized a state- 
wide “demonstration” in Flori- 
■ * da dial, if approved by the 
legislature, could extend health 
care coverage to 1.1 million un- 
insured people with incomes 
well above the poverty line. 

Oregon, Tennessee, Hawaii, 
Kentucky and Rhode Island are 
already canying out or will 
soon introduce programs that 
expand health coverage to hun- 
dreds' of thousands of people 
not reached by Medicaid, the 
federal-state health program for 
certain categories of the poor. 

A dozen other states either 
have applied for federal waivers 
of Medicaid law to allow such 
trials or are expected to ask for 
them soon. AD told, millions of 


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Away From 
Politics 

• John Wayne Bobbitt, 
who gained notoriety last 
year when his wife severed 
Ins penis, was sentenced to 
30 days in jail in Las Vegas 
in his second domestic bat- 
tery conviction this month. 
“One thing is apparent," 
the judge said, “and that is 
that you are a bully.” Mr. 
Bobbitt, 27, served 12 days 
earlier this month for a sep- 
arate assault that also in- 
volved his former fiancte, 
Kristina Elliott 

• Californians will be able 
to track the movements of 
the stale's estimated 41,000 
felony child molesters 
through dialing a “900” 
telephone number under 
legislation signed by Gov- 
ernor Pete Wilson. The law 
is the first of its kind in the 
nation to allow public ac- 
cess to information on sex 
offenders by way of the 
telephone system, the Re- 
publican governor said. 

• NASA’s second count- 
down for an environmental 
research flight by the shut- 
tle Endeavour proceeded 
free of problems toward a 
Friday morning launch. 

• Fifteen people who sued 
the tobacco industry may 
not recover damages for the 
costs of treating theirdga- 
retie habits, a federal judge 
ruled. 

• A teenager is suing Mi- 
chael Jackson for $20 mil- 
lion, alleging he was struck 
by the pop star’s van as Mr. 
Jackson fled a crowd of 
children outside a toy fac- 
tory in Brazil. The federal 
lawsuit riled on behalf of 
Alberto de Paolo, 16, says 
Mr. Jackson promised fi- 
nancial help after the Octo- 
ber 1993 crash, but only 
gave him a toy car. 

AP. AFP. Reuters 


uninsured could be given subsi- 
dized health policies through a 
state-based reform movement. 

While a desire to ease the 
problem of the uninsured partly 
explains the multitude of state 
initiatives, the major reason ap- 
pears to be fiscaL Faced with 
limits on borrowing and strong 
opposition to higher taxes, 
many governors are turning to 
“managed care" to stem the 
growth of their health budgets. 

Most state Medicaid pro- 
grams are run with question- 
able efficiency. By enrolling 
Medicaid recipients in commer- 
cial health plans that extract 
iscounts from hospitals 
doctors, state officials hope 
to save enough money to cover 
thousands more of the poor or 
near poor with the same 
amount of money. 

As businesses enroll more of 
their employees in health main , 
tenance organizations and oth- 
er managed care arrangements, 
hospitals and physicians' 
groups have been banding to- 
gether to gain leverage in nego- 
tiations with insurers over fees. 

A wave of mergers is sweep- 
ing through the hospital indus- 
try. Some high-priced physi- 
cians find themselves excluded 
from the networks of powerful 
health maintenance organiza- 
tions and insurance companies, 
and they have lost patients and 
earnings as a result 

This “managed care" revolu- 
tion is not acclaimed by all, 
however. With the collapse of 
federal health reform, some 
doctors, leaching hospitals, ru- 
ral health clinics and certain 
groups of patients have been 
left with little federal protection 

that'coiS^adversdy^ affect 
them. 





Vince Bikxv'A gmee Fnnc»-PrDJc 

CELEBRITY IN HER OWN RIGHT — Jo-Eflan Dimitrius, a jury consultant who has 


worked on several notorious cases, passing reporters at the Los Angeles courthouse 
where she is helping the defense in OJL Simpson's murder triaL The judge tided on 
Wednesday that he would not delay jury selection for a bearing on DNA evidence. 


Congress Unlikely to Set Haiti Deadline 


By Thomas W. Lippman 
and Helen Dewar 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — The Clinton ad- 
ministration has urged Congress not to set 
a specific date for ending the U. S. military 
operation in Haiti, and despite a chilly 
reception appears to have enough support 
to fend off a mandatory withdrawal dead- 
line. 

Members of both parties have signaled 
that the initial success of the mission is not 
enough to overcome their anger at having 
been bypassed in the decision to send the 
expedition. 

They said that they were seeking a For- 
mula that would reassert congressional au- 
thority over sending U.S. troops abroad 
without undermining the current mission 
in Haiti. 

But senior members of both houses and 
in both parties indicated that they would 
not insist on a mandatory pullout date for 
U.S. armed forces. 

Senator Christopher J. Dodd, Democrat 
of Connecticut, chairman of the foreign 
relations subcommittee on Western Hemi- 
sphere and Peace Corps affairs, said he 
believed there was “growing sentiment" 
against a withdrawal deadline, or at least 


against one to remove the troops before 
March. . 

Senator Dodd said he believed second 
thoughts about setting a withdrawal date 
were growing, especially among Republi- 
cans, who he said were reluctant to ignore 
military advice against a deadline. 

He said there was also a growing feeling 
that U.S. troops should be assured of 
having enough tune so international forces 
could take over peacekeeping duties as 
smoothly as possible. 

But he acknowledged that many sena- 
tors were reluctant to face voters without 
having set a deadline. 

House members also said they wanted to 
vote on Haiti in some way before adjourn- 
ment next month. 

The House Foreign Affairs Committee 
voted Wednesday to set a March I dead- 
line, after which the administration would 
need congressional approval to continue. 
The measure was approved, 27 to 19, in a 
party-line vote. 

All Republicans voted against it, saying 
it gave retroactive endorsement to Presi- 
dent Bfll Clinton’s commitment of troops 
and permitted their presence there for too 
long a period. 

The chairman, Lee H. H amil ton, Demo- 


crat of Indiana, said earlier that setting a 
review date would not necessarily mean 
the troops would have to leave Haiti then. 
The administration would have an oppor- 
tunity to persuade Congress to authorize a 
continuation. 

Such a resolution, even if mandatory, 
would have little practical impact if the 
U.S. operation unfolds according to the 
schedule that is proposed by the adminis- 
tration. 

At a Foreign Affairs Committee hear- 
ing the first congressional hearing since 
the American troops landed in Haiti 10 
days ago. Deputy Defense Secretary John 
M. Deuich and Deputy Secretary of Slate 
Strobe Talbott ran into a barrage of com- 
plaints from members of both parties. 

The lawmakers objected to the derision 
to send the troops without a congressional 
vote of approval, to the cost of the opera- 
tion, and to what several members said was 
the dubious commitment to democracy of 
ousted Haitian president, Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide. 

Several said they were uncomfortable at 
what they described as an "emerging doc- 
trine" of U. S. intervention on behalf of 
any elected leader in the Western Hemi- 
sphere who is overthrown. 


Haiti Moves 
To Open 
Debate on 
Amnesty 

Compiled hy Oar Staff From Oispaiftas 

PORT-AU-PRINCE. Haiti 
— Under the protection of 
American soldiers, the Haitian 
Parliament was reopening 
Wednesday to debate an am- 
nesty for the army officers who 
overthrew President Jean-Ber- 
trand Aristide. 

Eleven exiled Haitian law- 
makers arrived in Port-au- 
Prince from Miami to attend 
the session. Before they left. 
several said that while they op- 
posed an amnesty for the mili- 
tary rulers, they would go along 
with the move to ensure that the 
elected government to Haiti 
was restored. 

13.S. officials who are here as 
part of the Operation Uphold 
Democracy insisted that they 
had no intention of intervening 
in the proceedings in Parlia- 
ment. 

“It is a Haitian institution 
and a Haitian convocation of 
Parliament,” said the U.S. Em- 
bassy spokesman, Stanley 
Schrager. No U.S. soldiers 
would be allowed inside the 
building he confirmed. 

A declaration of amnesty for 
the bloody 1991 coup and the 
brutal human rights abuses that 
followed was pan of the Sept. 

1 8 agreement between the junta 
and an American delegation led 
by former President Jimmy 
Outer. The deal forestalled a 
U.S. invasion. 

“Personally, 1 think amnesty 
is an immoral act.” said Fritz 
Robert SL Paul, an exiled depu- 
ty. “But one of the conditions of 
the return of President Aristide 
is the amnesty. So we're going 
to do the sacrifice." 

Mr. St. Paul and the 10 other 
returning legislators who fled 
Haiti after the coup have been 
living in self-imposed exile in 
the United States and Canada- 

Some lawmakers threatened 
to resign or not to show up if 
U.S. troops are posted inside 
the legislature. The dominating 
foreign military presence is a 
sensitive issue in Haiti, a nation 
proud of being the first black 
republic. 

“There will be no foreign sol- 
diers within the Parliament 
building" said Frantz-Robert 
Monde, president of the 82- 
member Chamber of Deputies. 

Senator Thomas Eddy Dupi- 
ton, who did not plan to attend 
parliamentary session, called 
the U.S. occupation of Haiti's 
political institutions a “provo- 
cation." 

“I once admired the bald ea- 
gle for its grace.” he said. “Now 
I am struck by its rapacity. 
They came to reinforce our in- 
stitutions. Now they are tolling 
their death." 

Eleven other senators who 
were elected during military 
rule will be barred from the 
session. 

Other legislation on the agen- 
da includes the separation of 
the police from the armed 
forces, its reorganization and 
retraining and putting the po- 
lice under civilian command. 

(AP. AFP) 


yp POLITICAL NOTES * 


Rep u blicans Repl ay Rea gans P romises 

WASHINGTON — With flags waving, a bund playing 
and a bank of television cameras' rolling. Republican candi- 
dates for the House of Representatives mustered on the steps 
of the Capitol to sign a list of lux cuts and other measures that 
they promised to press in their first 100 days if they won 
control of the House in November. They called ij their 
“contract with America." 

In a way. it was a throwback to the Reagan era, with 
pledges of deep reductions in taxes for individuals and 
companies, a stronger military and a constitutional amend- 
ment requiring a balanced federal budget. In Reagan fashion, 
there was little mention of exactly where government spend- 
ing would be cut so that the lower taxes would not worsen the 
budget deficit. 

But the 10-poim list of promises differed with the Reagan 
policies in one important respect: The social issues like 
abortion, gun control, school prayer and flag-burning that 
dominated Republican dogma in the !9S0s were ignored. 

Democrats derided the Republicans as fiscallv irresponsi- 
ble. 

“All told." said Representative Richard A. Gephardt. 
Democrat of Missouri and the House majority leader, “their 
contract would blow u hole in the fcder.il budget of roughly 
SI trillion.'' 

But Representative Newt Gingrich of Georgia, who is in 
line to be Republican leader in the next Congress and speaker 
of the House iTRepublicuns are in the majority, was not fazed 
by Democratic accusations that Republicans sought a free 
lunch — lower taxes with no way to pay for them. 

He quoted Franklin D. Roosevelt: “We have nothing to 
fear but fear itself.” He quoted Ronald Reagan: “We have 
every right to dream heroic dreams: after all. we arc Ameri- 
cans." And he said that while it might be a heroic dream to 
think the budget could be balanccd. it could be accomplished 
through "tremendous creativity and new effort.” 

The contract resembled a party platform: a constitutional 
amendment requiring a balanced budget in five years and a 
three-fifths vote of both houses of Congress to raise taxes; a 
tax credit of $500 per child, regardless of the parents' income; 
a tax reduction for married couples; tax-free savings ac- 
counts; lower taxes for middle- and upper-income Social 
Security beneficiaries; tax breaks to help Americans buy 
insurance to cover long-term medical cure; lower capital 
gains tax rates: more favorable depreciation rules for busi- 
nesses; term limits for members of Congress; more applica- 
tions of the death penalty: cuts in spending on welfare; tax 
incentives for adoption: a stronger military, and much, much 
more. ~ { <V YT) 

Byrd Tak es High Road Away from Uproar 

WASHINGTON — The Senate Appropriations Commit- 
tee chairman, Robert C. Byrd. Democrat of West Virginia, 
has backed away from a potentially messy squabble with 
House Republicans by agreeing to relinquish most of the 
highway demonstration funds that had been earmarked for 
his home state. 

Stung by House Republicans' criticism that he had greedily 
hoarded more than a quarter of all available 1995 demonstra- 
tion monies for two West Virginia highway projects. Mr. 
Byrd returned $55 million of thcS95 million that had been set 
aside for his stale. Of the $352 million of special highway 
funds. S95 million had been allotted to West Virginia. 

In response. Representative Frank R. Wolf. Republican of 
Virginia, said he would drop plans to seek a vote on the 
House floor this week to return the fiscal 1995 transportation 
spending bill to conference with instructions to strip out 
much of the funding for the West Virginia projects. 

Most of those funds Were to be used for construction of 
Corridor H. an cast-west highway running across the state to- 
Mr. Wolfs Northern Virginia district. Mr. Wolf tried to slash 
the $95 million in conference, arguing that West Virginia was 
not capable of spending most of those funds in the coming 
years, but he was rebuffed by Senate leaders. 

The Northern Virginia Republican fought back with an 
intense media attack on Mr. Byrd, charging that he was guilty 
of “greed,” "highway robbery” and “abuse of power.” Mr. 
Byrd blamed Mr. Wolf for “manipulating the facts.” But 
fearing that Mr. Wolfs challenge could derail the transporta- 
tion spending bill before the start of the new fiscal year, Mr. 
Byrd and the House Appropriations Committee chairman, 
David R. Obey. Democrat of Wisconsin, reached agreement 
Tuesday to slash West Virginia's allotment of demonstration 
funds. 

As a compromise, the conferees pledged to “make every 
effort” to provide additional funds for Mr. Byrd’s project in 
the future. ( WP) 

Quole/llnquote 

President Bill Clinton on his relationship with President 
Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia: “I've spent more time with him 
than any other besides Kohl. He is always scrupulous about 
keeping his word to me, and I just like him. He's always 
trying to do the right thing. If you think someone is being 
honest, then it's a lot easier to work out your differences. Wc 
just get along.” 


Prospect of Korea Nuclear Pact Soon Fades 


Compiled hy Ovr Staff From Dispatches 

GENEVA — U.S. and North 
Korean negotiators held more 
than three hours of talks on 
Wednesday on restructuring 
Pyongyang’s suspect nuclear 
program, with hopes declining 
that a deal could be struck this 
week. 

Officials said the U.S. negoti- 
ator, Robert L. Gaflucd, and 
the North Korean delegate, 
Kang Sok Ju, agreed to meet 
again Thursday. 

A North Korean spokesman 
said the two sides had held “se- 
rious and businesslike discus- 
sions.” The U.S. statement said 
there had been “an extensive 
exchange of views.” 

Mr. Gallucd made no addi- 
tional comment when he left 
Pyongyang’s mission in Gene- 
va, where the negotiations had 
gone into its sixth day. 

After talks on Tuesday, the 
U.S. delegation said there had 
been “no progress.” Diplomats 
said there were increasing signs 
that it would prove impossible 
to achieve a formal agreement 
this week, as had been hoped. 

The United States wants 
North Korea to replace the 


graphite-moderated nuclear re- 
actors it is developing with 
light-water versions. Graphite- 
moderated reactors generate 
plutonium that can be used for 
nuclear arms, while light-water 
reactors produce little plutoni- 
um. 

Differences at this stage of 
the talks are believed to center 
on a North Korean demand for 
a $2 billion payment as addi- 
tional compensation for dis- 
mantling its nuclear program. 

Another issue, but one the 
United States had signaled it 
was ready to put put off for 
now, is a demand that Pyong- 
yang allow the inspection of 

two sites that could show 
whether it already has made nu- 
clear devices. 

Even if no detailed pact was 
reached now, diplomats said, a 
further round of talks is almost 
certain. 


Percy in Madrid for Talks 

Reuters 

MADRID — The U.S. de- 
fense secretary, William J. Per- 
ry, arrived Wednesday for talks 
with Spanish officials. 


“No one is interested in see- 
ing this effort collapse." said an 
official close to the negotia- 
tions. “They are bound to want 
to keep talking.” 

The two countries, adversar- 
ies in the 1950-53 Korean War 
and bitter enemies for the ensu- 
ing four decades, have already 
reached outline agreement on a 
first step toward diplomatic re- 
lations. 

Washington has made clear, 
however, that any further step 
in this direction depends on a 
solution to the nuclear issue, 
which would ensure that North 


Korea could not produce nucle- 
ar arms in the future and would 
resolve doubts on whether it 
had done so already. 

Separately, the North Kore- 
an government renewed its pro- 
test against the deployment of a 
U.S. naval battle group off Ko- 
rea because of the tensions over 
the nuclear program. 

The official Rodong Sinmun 
newspaper in Pyongyang called 
the deployment "gunboat di- 
plomacy” devised by “hard-line 
conservative forces” to try to 
force concessions in Geneva. 

(Reuters, AP) 


U.S. May Allow Russian Handguns 


Las Angela Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Bowing to Russia’s 
desperate need for export earnings, the Clin- 
ton administration is moving toward a deci- 
sion to let Moscow sell a famous Russian 
product in the United States: handguns. 

As a result, the Makarov 9mm semiauto- 
matic pistol the favorite side arm of KGB 
spies and Cold War bad guys, may soon be 
available in gun stores. 

An American gun importer has filed an 
application to sell as many as 7 million Rus- 
sian firearms in the United States, and the 
administration is leaning toward approving at 
least part of the deal, officials said. 


The decision is still being debated between 
the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Alco- 
hol, Tobacco and Firearms, which is hesitant 
to open U.S. gates to more inexpensive gun 
imports, and the State Department, which 
wants to give a break to President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, who is visiting Washington. 

The administration has been putting pres- 
sure on Mr. Yeltsin to stop selling high-tech 
weapons to Iran and some U.S. officials see 
the handgun deal as a reasonable substitute. 

“If we want them to listen to us on issues 
like Iran, we have to let them compete on the. 
world market with products they can sell,” a 
State Department official said. 


Republicans Take 
Control of CI-S. Senate 


\ 


What would you give to see this headline on 
November 9. 1994? Five minutes of your time and 
your absentee vote could make it happen! 

Far absentee voting information call your U.S. Consulate or 
Fax Republicans Abroad in the U.S. at (2021 737-2687 
Paid for by Republicans Abroad 


LEGAL NOTICE 


In the matter of Confederation Treasury Services (U.K-) pic. 
and 

in the matter of the Insolvency Act 1986 

Notice Is hereby given Lhal Anthony James McMahon 
and Peter Joseph Belme of KPMG were appointed Joint 
liquidators of the company wtth effect from 2 September 
1994 following meetings of the cumparry and creditors held 
on 23 August 1994 and 2 September 1994. 

The creditors of the above-named company are required, 
on or before 30 October 1994. to send In their full forenames 
and surnames, their addresses and descriptions, full 
particulars of their debts or claims, and the names and 
addresses of their solicitors (If any), to the undersigned 
Anthony James McMahon of KPMG Peal Marwick. FO Box 
730. 20 Farringdon Street. London. EC4A 4PP. Joint 
liquidator of the said company, and. If so required by notice 
in writing from the said Joint liquidators, are. personally or 
by their solicitors, to come in and prove their debts or claims 
at such time and place as shall be specified In such notice, 
or In default thereof they will be excluded from Ihe benefiL of 
any dlstrlbuUon made before such debts are proved. 

Date 21 September 1994 

A-J. McMahon 
Joint liquidator 



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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sttbime T When China’s Scarcities Become the World’s Probterri 


Pubfohrd Widi Thp Nrw Turk Tlun Mitt Tk Vnhiajtai] (Vti 


Slippery Objectives in Haiti 


One Clinton, goal in Haiti is to provide 
enough stability for the Haitians to launch 
democracy. A second goal is to get out by 
prompt stages — scaling back from 15,000 
to 2*000 soldiers and from U.S. to UN 
control after parliamentary elections in 
December, followed by full American 
withdrawal and a return to complete Hai- 
tian control after presidential elections a 
year hence. Stability and withdrawal — 
the early going undeijlines the potentially 
frazzling inconsistency of these goals. 

At first U.S. soldiers stood by uncer- 
tainly as Haitian police, ostensibly Amer- 
ica’s new partners, beat up demonstra- 
tors. That embarrassment was curtailed 
by giving American troops more assertive 
orders to protect Haitians as well as 
themselves. Many ordinary Haitians 
seem delighted finally to be shielded from 
their longtime tormentors. But while 
some have responded by handing over 
weapons, others respond by looting and 
threatening vengeance. 

Eager for a low profile, the United 
States is being drawn toward a high one 
in defense of both sides. Even more will 
this be so when the dictator Raoul Cedras 
steps down and President Jean-Bertrand 
Aristide returns in mid-October. A quick 
start on weeding out and trying to train 
the security elements and subordinating 
them to political authority is the key. 

A further requirement, daunting but 
unavoidable now that troops are there, is 
to crank up a Haitian political process. 
Washington is now reassembling and 
protecting the authentically elected Par- 
liament. This will test whether Mr. Aris- 


Arms: Yeltsin Has It Right 


While the Pentagon seems to be de- 
flecting President Bill Clinton from nego- 
tiating deeper cuts in U.S. and Russian 
nuclear arms. Russia's president. Boris 
Yeltsin, remains firmly on course. In a 
speech to the United Nations General 
Assembly, he urged further arms reduc- 
tions — and more. 

Mr. Yeltsin wants to speed up the 
talks to prohibit nuclear tests by having 
a global ban ready for signing by Octo- 
ber 1995, the 50th anniversary of the 
United Nations. Mr. Clinton would be 
wise to join him in setting that target 
date and pressing to meet lL If the two 
leaders do not hit the accelerator, the 
talks are likely to stall. 

Mr. Yeltsin also urged Britain. France 
and China to join the United States and 
Russia in nuclear reductions. They could 
start with a treaty to halt production of 
plutonium and weapons-grade ur anium 


and to bar production of warheads with 
nuclear material extracted from disman- 
tled warheads. 

Finally. Mr. Yeltsin favors more pre- 
cise security guarantees as an induce- 
ment for states to remain nuclear-free. 
What would be useful is an agreement 
bv the United States. Russia, Britain, 
France and China never to use or threat- 
en to use nuclear arms against states 
that are observing treaties barring weap- 
ons of mass destruction. 

Further arms cuts would alleviate con- 
cern about the theft or misuse of Russia's 
remaining nuclear weapons. They would 
also have a salutary effect on next year’s 
conference to review the Nuclear Non- 


proliferation Treaty. They would enable 
Boris Yeltsin and Bill Clinton to secure 
what they rightly want — unlimited ex- 
tension of that treaty'. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Vision in a Rear-View Mirror 


More than 300 Republican candi- 
dates for the House of Representatives 
promised this week that, if elected, they 
will provide a positive new vision for 
their party and for America. The body 
and soul of this vision is to be found in 
10 bills they plan to offer in the next 
session of Congress. 

It Is a vision that looks backward. Rea- 
ganism in a rear-view mirror. What this 
self-styled “Contract With America' 1 
says to voters is that these Republicans 
do not speak candidly. 

Tote up the promises. Led by the mi- 
nority whip. Newt Gingrich, this group of 
Republicans would balance the budget 
while adding to defense spending and 
cutting taxes on capital gains and Social 
Security benefits for wealthier recipients. 
. They would also ease the tax burden on 
• nonpoor families with children, corpo- 
rate investment, retirement savings and 
the estates of wealthy families. 

The Republicans, a deficit-conscious 
bunch until Ronald Reagan came along, 
estimate that their largesse would cost the 
Treasury about SI 50 billion over five 
years, "the While House puts the cost at 
$800 billion. Even the White House esti- 
mate may be low. The Congressional 
Budget Office says it would take more 
than $700 billion in budget cuts over five 
wars to balance the existing budget — 
before the Republicans start hiking 
defense spending and cutting taxes. 

The Republicans would keep costs in 


line by finding fat in federal programs, 
though the contract does not say where: 
Even if Congress adopted every one of 
these proposals — a politically preposter- 
ous prospect — the Republicans would be 
hundreds of billions shy of their promises. 

Nor does the contract reflect a sense of 


fair play. The cut in the capital gains tax 
would largely benefit high-income fam- 


would largely benefit high-income fam- 
ilies and, because it would also apply to 
profits on old investments, is not targeted 
to stimulate new investment. 

The tax credit for children would yield 
nothing to families too poor to owe taxes. 
The Social Security tax cuts apply only to 
high-income families. Tax breaks for in- 
vestment and savings, even if they favor 
the rich, can be defended. But they would 
have to be designed to boost productivity 
and be part of an overall package that 
spreads tax burdens fairly. By this stan- 
dard, the Gingrich compact flunks. 

The other bills making up vision deal 
with issues from welfare to crime to long- 
term health care. Some are good, some bad. 
but most are presented honestly. This is not 
true of the economic nostrums. 

The Republicans ought to admit that 
their programs would require cutting hun- 
dreds of billions out of about $1 J trillion 
in federal spending — thus slicing 20 per- 
cent or more out of every program from 
Social Security to the FBI. Mr. Gingrich 
promised a positive vision. What voters 
got was duplicitous propaganda. 

— THE j SEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Comment 


'What Role for Japan in the UN? 


Why is the Foreign Ministry so enthu- 
siastic [about Japan's plea for a seat on 
the United Nations Security Council}? 

For us. the question of what wc can do 
is more important than just the act of 
getting a seat. 

What kind of a role has Japan played 
in the United Nations in the past? 
Hasn’t it often turned its back to the 
nuclear ban movement? Hasn’t it only 


been following the United States? 
Whether we tike it or not. the Security 
Council determines the military action 
of the United Nations. Can Japan really 
refuse to take military action, while ask- 
ing other countries to contribute? 

“Yes,” says the Japanese government. 
But, in die past, it has always modified 
the constitution to suit the reality instead 
of defending it. We are afraid it will 
happen again. 

— Mainichi Shimbun (Tokyo). 



International Herald Tribune 

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W ASHINGTON — Will 
China have enough foreign 


tide can. as he must, show much more 
readiness to work with other political 
interests than be did before his exile. A 
litmus issue looms: whether to offer the 
military regime a narrow amnesty for its 
coup or a broad amnesty for its subse- 


VV China have enough foreign 
exchange to import the grain it 
needs in coming years? Will the 
grain even be available? 

If the premise underlying the 
growing demand for grain is a 
continuation of China's eco- 
nomic boom, there would likely 
be ample income from industrial 
exports to pay for needed im- 


By Lester R. Brown 

This is the second of two articles. 


quent appalling human rights violations. 
The Cedras gang might earn gentler treat- 


The Cedras gang might earn gentler treat- 
ment if it cooperated in disarming all its 
thugs, in uniform and out. 

Then, Haiti must be rebuilt, or at least 
assisted. Already American forces are de- 
livering extra emergency supplies. The 
weapons buy-back, program has an eco- 
nomic aspect. Bill Clinton has lifted the 
American sanctions pressing on the peo- 
ple, leaving in place those pressing on the 
elite. Every effort should be made to 
make Father Aristide the political benefi- 
ciary of the lifting of the remaining inter- 
national sanctions. Economic coopera- 
tion with the elite, which admittedly is in 
a good position to provide logistical sup- 
port for the occupation, should be held to 
a minimum a broad range of Haitians 
must be drawn into the international 
planning for economic revival 

The American challenge is to monitor 
these functions and nudge them ahead, 
but not to take them over. Some in the 
U.S. Congress would enforce this formi- 
dable task by setting a date to terminate 
the occupation. In fact, public opinion 
and the administration's own anxieties 
already have it on a short tether. It would 
not help to deny it tactical flexibility to 
deal with the inevitable frustrations and 
surprises of a demanding mission. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


ports. Buying wheat or com at 
1994 prices averaging $150 a ion 
would require $15 billion to 
meet an import need of 100 mil- 
lion tons. 

Given the likely continuing 
growth in China’s □ onagri cul- 
tural exports, importing 200 mil- 
lion tons of gram, or even 300 
million tons, at current prices 
would be within economic range 
if the country’s leaders were will- 
ing to use a modest share of their 
export earnings for this purpose. 
Of course, it would mean cutting 


back on imports of capital 
goods, which would diminish the 


goods, which would diminish the 
inflow of technology needed to 
sustain the economic expansion. 

The more diffi cult question is 
who could supply China with 


grain on such a scale. The an- 
swer; no one. Since 1980, ann u a l 
world grain exports have aver- 
aged about 200 million tons, of 
which dose to half comes from 
the United States. But like China, 
the United States is suffering 
losses of cropland and irrigation 
water to nonfarm uses. Given the 
projected addition of 95 million 
to America’s population over the 
next four decades, including both, 
natural increase and immigra- 
tion, America's exportable sur- 
plus may not increase at alL 

With more than 100 countries 
already importing American 
grain, and with their import 
needs projected to climb, any 
exportable surplus is largely spo- 
ken for. For example, over the 
next 40 years Egypt's grain im- 
ports are projected to rise to 21 

milli on tons, from 8 milli on in 
1990. and Mexico’s to 19 million 
tons from 6 million tons. 

So no country or group of 
countries has the potential to fill 
more than a small fraction of 


China’s future food deficit. 

At the same time, huge defi- 
cits loom elsewhere in the world. 
Africa is expected to need 250 
million tons of grain by 2030, 10 
times current imports. The Indi- 
an subcontinent is expected to 
have a deficit several tunes larg- 
er than at present- Scores of 
countries with rapid population 


growth — among them Iran, 
Ethiopia and Nigeria — will face 
huge food deficits in the next 
few decades. 

In such circumstances, China's 
requirements will cause fierce 
competition for limited export- 


able supplies, driving world grain 
prices far above familiar levels. 


prices far above familiar levels. 
The Chinese government might 
not be able to withstand the 
spreading public protests if food 
prices run out of centred as they 
did early this year. 

China may succeed in import- 
ing much more grain than it now 
does, but that success would have 
to come partly at the expense of 
less affluent societies. And, as 


U.S. consumers find _ themselves 
competing with their Chinese 
counterparts for U5.-produced 
grain, the political fallout could 
lead to pressure far export restrict 
tions or even embargoes. 

If a chasm develops between 
world supply and demand for 
g rain, rising prices will damp de- 
mand for food worldwide, reduc- 
ing consumption among rich and 
pom. For the former, it win mean 
less fat-rich livestock products 
(and less cardiovascular disease), 
much as happened in the eady 
1940s in Britain when German 
submarines cut off grain ship- 
ments. But for the hundreds of 
millions of landless rural workers - 
and urban poor who remain on 
the lower rungs of the global eco- 
nomic ladder, food consumption 
could well drop bdow the surviv- 
al level 

The bottom fine is that when 
China turns to world markets on 
an ongoing basis, its food scarcity 
wifi become tire world’s scarcity. 
Its shortages of cropland and wa- 
ter will become the world’s short- 
ages. Its failure to check popula- 
tion growth much more aggres- 


mems, however reluctantly, tore- 
assess their population and edit- 
sumption pdBcusS. / ' 

It will probably not be inlhe ■ 
devastation of Somalia, Hait|ttr 
Rwanda, but in the bootmng ~ 
economy of China that we M wifi 
see the inevitable collision be- 


tween expanding human ; de- 
mand for food and the limits of 
some of Earth’s basic systems. 
They include the capacity of - 
ocean fisheries to prc&ucesea- 
food, of the hydrological cycle to 

supply fresh water, and of crops 

to use more fertilizer effectively. . 

The shock waves from ‘tins 
collision will reverberate - 
throughout the world economy, 
with consequences that we ean - 
now only begin to foresee. ‘‘ 


The writer is president of the 
Worldwatch Institute, an environ- 
mental research group l He ' con- 
tributed this comment to the In- 
ternational Herald Tribune. ■ 


An Unpleasant Turn to Milosevic 
May Be the Only Way in Bosnia 


By James G. Lowen stein 


W ASHINGTON — Bosnia is again at 
the precipice, and so are those coun- 


W the precipice, and so are those coun- 
tries whose interests have become engaged 
in this particular Balkan crisis. 

There seems little question that with their 
continued refusal to accept the proposed 
49-51 percent division of Bosnia, the Bosni- 
an Serbs will renew the fighting. That may, 
in turn, increase pressure to lift the arms 
embargo on Bosnia unilaterally after the 
six-month delay requested by the Bosnian 
Muslims. The United Nations certainly wifi 
continue to refuse to do so. The French, 
British and Russians would then pull out 
their peacekeeping forces. Other contribut- 
ing nations would have to follow suit 

In these circumstances, the war would 
become even more ferocious, Muslim 
countries might come to the aid of their 
Muslim brothers in Bosnia, and the con- 
flict could spread. 

It seems idle to believe that a Yugoslav 
Serbian quarantine of the Bosnian Serbs, 
no matter how well policed, will persuade 
them to accept the present proposal As 
has been true in this war, the only effective 
pressure is military, and that only if force 
is applied. There is obviously no chance 
that military force will be employed 


Yugoslav National Army, into Serbian 
Bosnia and incorporate it into the greater 
Serbia that has always been his objective? 
What if he committed hims elf at the same 
time to respect the 49-51 percent partition 
of Bosnia, enforcing that commitment 
with his army, and to agree to the interna- 
tionalization of Sarajevo under the protec- 
tion of United Nations forces? 

The war would then be brought to an end. 
Admittedly, it would not be a just end. The 
dream of preserving a multiethnic Bosnian 
state would be shattered. Aggression and 






“e thni c cleansing” would remain unpun- 
ished. But the lolling would finally end 


against the Bosnian Serbs by the United 
States, the Europeans, NATO or the Unit- 
ed Nations. Indeed, there is only one po- ‘ 
tential source, and that is Slobodan Milo- 
sevic’s Serbia. 

What if Mr. Milosevic were to send his 
army, the bulk of what used to be the 


isfaed But the kOfing would finally end. 

The Bosnian M uslims would have their 
own state, with boundaries to which they 
had agreed, if reluctantly. They would be 
spared the horrors of the renewal of a sav- 
age war in which they would be at a grievous 
military disadvantage, even if the embargo 
were eventually to be lifted America’s rela- 
tions with its NATO allies, surely a major 
VS. interest, would no longer be threatened 
by increasingly divergent policies. 

Would Mr. Milosevic be willing to take 
an action opposed by his fellow Serbs in 
Bosnia who want more territory? And 
would be abide by the commitment to go no 
further and to p er mi t Sarajevo to be inte^p 
nationalized? Surely, there are enough in- - 
ducements available of both a positive and" 
negative character. Mr. Milosevic wants 
economic sanctions lifted He Has a ruined 
economy to repair. He leads a state that still 
is regarded as an international pariah. These 


ByFKNCBO.C*v 


circumstances are not conducive to retain- 


ingpower over the long run. 
The United States, the Eu 


The United States, the European mem- 
bers of NATO, and the UN have never been 
willing to impose a settlement by force. If 
the war resumes, it is difficult to see bow the . > 
situation on the ground would evolve to the 
point that the Bosnian Muslims would be 
able to achieve a more favorable agreement 
than the 51 to 49 percent division agreed to 
by all parties except the Bosnian Serbs. 


On the Gulf War, Carter’s Citizen Diplomacy Was Way OutofLine 


W ashington — T he most 

startling fact to come out of 
Jimmy Carter’s Haitian Interrup- 
tus had nothing to do with Haiti. 
It had to do with Mr. Carter’s 
lobbying of foreign governments 
to stop a sitting president from 
waging a war he believed to be in 
America's vital interest. 

little — too little — has been 
made of this disclosure from Mr. 
Carter in an interview with The 
New York Tunes (IHT, Sept 22). 
The Times relayed this historical- 
ly unprecedented information to 
its readers on SepL 21 in para- 
graph 34 of a 45-paragraph story. 

Other newspapers and the' 
broadcast media briefly men- 
tioned Mr. Carter's account to 
The Times of his secret appeal to 
members of the United Nations 
Security Council in 1990 to deny 
President George Bush their sup- 
port for Operation Desert Storm. 
But it then swiftly disappeared in 
follow-up coverage. 


By Jim Hoagiand 


It should not disappear. What- 
ever you think of the results of his 
recent interventions on Haiti and 
North Korea — on balance I find 
them positive — what Mr. Carter 
did to undermine the legitimacy of 
an American-led attack on Iraqi 
forces occupying Kuwait was 
wrong. There Mr. Carter crossed a 
line that even the dimwiited For- 
rest Gump might have seen. 

In Haiti a desperate President 
Bill Clinton authorized Mr. Car- 
ter to negotiate on his behalf. If 
Mr. Carter gave away too much, 
Mr. Clinton let him do jl The 
Georgian’s asinine admission to 
Raoul Cedras that he was 
ashamed of Clinton policies to- 
ward Haiti ultimately harmed 
only Mr. Carter. If that bit of 
sharing by Mr. Carter helped 
avoid a perilous and misguided 
invasion, so be il 

Mr. Carter’s citizen diplomacy 


in North Korea was less felicitous. 
Invited to Pyongyang by Kim H 
Sung, Mr. Carter made it dear to 
the State Department that be 
would go whether Mr. Clinton 
blessed his effort or noL With a 
political gun to his head, Mr. Clin- 
ton lukewarmly embraced Mr. 
Carter’s mission to Pyongyang, 
where the ex-president misstated 
the terms of the deal the adminis- 
tration could tolerate. 

But Mr. Carter helped push 
Washington and Pyongyang into 
a more productive dialogue. The 
administration now has an op- 
portunity to discover if Mr. Kim’s 
successors are interested in 
emerging from the paranoia and 
economic disaster of a half-centu- 


ry. That opportunity exists 
thanks to the persistence (South- 


thanks to the persistence (South- 
ern-speak for chutzpah) of the 
man from Plains, Georgia. 

All of this is to say that I cut 


Mr. Carter more slack as presi- 
dent and as ex-president than 
many do. His intelligence and de- 
cency made him an honorable 
misfit in Washington politics. His 
moralizing and stuffiness made 
him an easy target for Republi- 
cans. neoconservative Democrats 
and the media. One of the best 
thongs that can be said of Mr. 
Carter as president was that be 
made impressive enemies. 

In the retirement America’s vot- 
ers awarded him, Mr. Carter seems 
to have become overly impressed 
with his own intelligence and de- 
cency. His self-esteem leads him 
into amazing demonstrations of 
confidence in his own judgment 
(Southern-speak for arrogance). It 
leads him into pubKdy criticizing 
the policies and judgment not only 
of his Republican successors but 
even the current Democratic for- 
eign policy team drawn in large 
part from bis own presidency. 

Criticism is fine. But in the case 


You Really Have to Strain to Hear That ‘Sucking Sound 9 


tive through diplomatic channels, 
not from Mr. Carter. 


S TANFORD, California — 
Reports by international or- 


ganizations are usually greeted 
with well deserved yawns. Occa- 
sionally, however, such a report is 
a leading, indicator of a sea 
change in opinion. 

Not long ago, the World Eco- 
nomic Forum — which every year 
draws the world’s political and 
business elite to its conference in 
Davos, Switzerland — released its 
annual report on international 
competitiveness. The report made 
headlines because it demoted Ja- 
pan and declared America the 
world's most competitive economy. 

But the revealing part of the 


report lies in its introduction, 
which offers a seemingly dear vi- 
sion of the global economic fu- 
ture. That vision, shared by many 
powerful people, is compelling 
and alarming. It is also nonsense. 

The report finds that the 
spread of modern technology to 
newly industrializing nations is 
deindustrializing high-wage na- 
tions. Capital is Dewing to Third 
World regions, and low-cost pro- 
ducers in these countries are 
flooding world markets with 
cheap manufactured goods. 

The report predicts that these 
trends will accelerate, service 
jobs will soon begin to follow 
the lost jobs in manufacturing 
and that the future of the high- 
wage nations offers a bleak choice 
between de clining wages and ris- 
ingiraemploymenL 

This virion resonates with many 


By Paul Krugman 

people. Yet as a description of North will 
what has happened in recent years, northern ii 
it is almost completely untrue. they are nc 
Rapidly growing Third World in exports f 
economies have indeed increased The auth 
their exports of manufactured dently envl 
goods. But today these exports scale Third 
absorb only about 1 percent of es. But it is ; 
First World income. Moreover, accounting 
Third World nations have also runs a trade 
increased their imports. a net invest 

Overall, the effect of Third So large- 
World growth on the number of don can ta 
industrial jobs in Western nations wage natiot 
has been minimal. Growing ex- of capital 1 
ports to the newly industrializing This seems 
countries have created about as itcontradic 
many jobs as growing imports which predi 
have displaced. into low-wa 

What about capital flows? The Thus, the 
numbers sound impressive. Last competitive 
year, $24 billion flowed to Mexi- not only wi 
co and $11 billion to China. itself. Yet 
The total movement of capital growing ns 
from advanced to developing na- men and w 
tions was about 560 billion. But That is a dc 
though this sounds like a lot, it Not eve 
is pocket change in a world econ- about low-\ 
omy that invests more than $4 protection^ 
trillion a year. of the worl 

In other words, if the vision of port surely 
a Western economy bartered by champions ■ 
low-wage competition is meant to Nonethci 

describe today** world, it is a fan- ideas have t 
tasy with hardly any basis. that much 1 

Even if the vision does not de- ed opinion t 
scribe the present, might it de- with Ross I 
scribe the future? sucking sou 

WeU. growing exports of man- suggests tiu 
ufac aired goods from South to sensus that 


relatively free and that has al- 
lowed hundreds of millions of 


North will lead to a net loss of 
northern industrial jobs only if 


they are not matched by growth 
in exports from North to South. 

Hie authors of the report evi- 
dently envision a future of large- 
scale Third World trade surplus- 
es. But it is an unavoidable fact of 
accounting that a country that 
runs a trade surplus must also be 
a net investor in other countries. 

So large-scale deindustrializa- 
tion can take place only if low- 
wage nations are major exporters 
of capital to high-wage nations. 
This seems unlikely. In any case, 
it contradicts the rest of the story, 
which predicts huge capital Dows 
into low-wage nations. 


lowed hundreds of millions of 
people in the Third World to get 

their first taste of prosperity, may 
be unraveling. 


The writer, a professor of eco- 
nomics at Stanford University, is 
author of “ Peddling Prosperity.’* 
He contributed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


not from Mr. Garter. 

But that is not the point. The 
point is that ex-presidents of the 
united States are not private citi- 
zens. Congress has recognized 
this by appropriating taxpayers’ 
money to provide for their pro- 
tection, comfort and staff. 

Discretion and common sense 
— in the form of recognizing that 
the United States has only one 
president at a time — would seem 
to be a minimal payback. 

The Washington Post 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


ofl^^to^^SiS 1894fl A Chinese Collapse -tberaTheGennanis adopting this 

This seems unlikely. In any case, sham/IWat r- w attitiMe in order to regain trade 

it contradicts the rest of thestoty, ^ during the war and to tra to 

which predicts huge capital flows river, which is roposh^the^- Iec0nqucr losl COmmeraai £ ^ ds * 

^^Speab 

carding ihar aims because of want SUPREME HEAD QUA R- 
l v^ U lh^ of ammunition. Being cut off from JERS, Allied Expeditionary 

Sin! LiLJtr ? ippUcs ’ Chinese defences — [From our New York 

growing number of influential have completely collapsed and are edition:] ^Ve shall obliterate Na- 

- Pdan ’ w «y name of theJapa- General Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Not everyone who worries nese inspiring terror everywhere promised the German people to- 


reconquer lost commercial 


► try to 

fields. 


not only with the facts but with 
itsdf. Yet it is a vision that a 


growing number of influential 
men and women seem to share. 
That is a dangerous trend. 

Not everyone who worries 
about low-wage competition is a 
protectionist. Indeed, the authors 
of the world competitiveness re- 
port surely would claim to be 
champions of free trade: 

Nonetheless, the fact that such 
ideas have become respectable — 
that much would-be sophisticat- 
ed opinion apparently now agrees 
with Ross Perot about the “great 
sucking sound” from the South — 
suggests that the intellectual con- 
sensus that has kept world trade 


1919: The 'New 5 Germans 


BRUSSELS — In connection 
with the peaceful American busi- 
ness invasion of Belgium, man y 
salesmen from the United States 
are going on from here to Germa- 
ny. Those travellers who have had 
dealings with the Germans report 
that they are doing everything to 
counteract sentiment against 


edition:] “We shall obliterate Na- 
zism and German militarism,” 
General Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Promised the Ger man people to- 
day [Sept 28] in his “Proclama- 
tion No. 1.” “We shall overthrow 
the Nazi rule, dissolve the Nazi 
party and abolish the exuri, op- 
pressive and discriminatory laws 
and institutions which the party 
has created," he declared. He fur- 
ther said he would punish both 
mffitary and party leadexs. the Ge- 
stapo and others proved guilty of 
crimes and atrocities. We come as 

conquerors, but not as oppres* 
Sots,” General Eisaihowcr 


■ . ,N 

si" ! .-w ■ ’ 

A ;* ‘ • ..-ii 


sively will, affect everyone. 

The economic future of Coni ' r 
and tire world outside are meXtri- . ; 
cably finked- A huge grain deficit 
in China wifi force other ^jvem- 


it. , . 


v..i" - , - 


...t M 
’...,.1,11 


. 4;- ..■..i*:" ‘* J 

•" ‘ii 

• . «■* ... -Vi*« • ( 

V 1 .. V • ' “V- A 1 ** 

'■ ■ Vi 


It may not be the most palatable choice to 
have to turn to Slobodan Milosevic to 
solve a problem that he was most responsi- 
ble for creating, but it may be the only way 
out for the Bosnian Muslims — and -for 
everyone else as WdL • 


The writer, a retired U.S. diptomat who 
served in Yugoslavia twice . is with AP.CO 
Associa te s, a Washington consulting firm. He 
contributed this view to The Washington Post 


of Desert Storm, Mr. Carter did 
not simply write op-ed page 
pieces or give speeches to sway 
public opinion and get the Ameri- 
can electorate to demand changes 
in policy. He actively promoted 
an alternative policy. 

“I decided when President 
Bush went for the UN resolution 
to permit aimed action, to try to 
block it, which was not appropri- 
ate perhaps. But I wrote every 
member of the UN Security 
Council except Mrs. Thatcher — 
I thought it was a waste of a 
stamp — and asked them not to 
vote for the resolution and I sent 
President Bush a copy,- so I 
wouldn't go behind the presi- 
dent’s back,” Mr. Carter said. - 

Brent Scowcroft, Mr. Bush’s 
national security adviser and a 
man with a good memory, tells me 
he has no recollection of Mr. Car- 
ter haring communicated with the 
White House. Other ex-officials 
say that Mr. Bush and Mr. Scow- 
croft learned of the Carter uritia- 


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Page 5 



EVrERNATlOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


OPINION 




A Melody to Doctor Gramm’s Prescriptions 


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Out of Ik 


W ASHINGTON - Senator Phil 
Gr amm , the Texas Republican, is 
agreeably free of defying coyness: “I 
made up my mind a long time ago to run 
for president” 

His wife Wendy, an Asian-Amezican 
who served in the Reagan and Bush ad- 
ministrations, is on the board of visitors of 
the University of Iowa college of business 
administration and the board of directors 
of Iowa Beef Products, the largest employ- 
er in the state that begins the delegate 
selection process. ‘'This,” says Mr. Gr amm 
of the coming campaign, “is something we 
have been working at a long time.” 

From 1992 through this fall's elections 
he will have spent 286 days cm the road 
away from Washington and Texas. In the 
last 100 days of tins autumn's campaign he 
will attend events in 34 states. His comput- 
erized data base on people he has met since 
1991 is at 164,454 names and expan ding 
Everyone on the list gets correspondence 
from him. This list includes the na mes 
of 62,000 Iowaos. 

In 1988, 108,000 lowans attended the 
Republican caucuses, which Bob Dole 
won with 34,000 votes. The CD-ROM data 
displaying the Gramm campaign's pro- 
gress, needs and timetable fins the screen 
II times just listing the sites in Iowa and 
New Hampshire he has visited since 1991. 

Mr. Gramm says that he failed third, 
seventh and ninth grades because of prob- 
lems with reading and arithmetic. Today 
he is one of three senators with PhJ)i 
(Daniel Patrick Moynihan and Paul Well- 
stone are the others). 

He came to politics From the economics 


By George F. Will 

department at Texas A&M, where he met 
Wendy, another PhD., who also was 
teaching economics there. He has meticu- 
lously studied the ari thme tics of presiden- 
tial campaigning and brings astonishing 
zest to the economics of presidential 
campaigning. T love raising money. I be- 
lieve in what I'm doing and don't mmri 
asking for help." 

He has a donors list of 88,000 names. 
Two million other people have contributed 
$109 million to the Republican Party in 
response to letters he has signed as chair- 
man of the Republican Senate Campaign 
Committee. His presidential campaign wiH 
absorb some of that committee’s staff, who 
w£Q be sent to states where they worked 

on Senate campaigns. 

He believes the “money filter” in 1995 
will winnow the field of serious candidates. 
To be serious, he says, a candidate will need 
to have upward of 525 milli on before Iowa. 
Given the compression of the 1996 nomi- 
nating season, delegate selection will hap- 
pen too fast to allow anyone to raise large 
sums on the basis of early victories. Mr. 
Dole can raise the early money. Many pro- 
fessionals doubt that' Lamar Alexander, 
Dick Cheney or Dan Quayle can, or that 
Jack Kemp will want to. 

After Iowa (Feb. 12) and New Hamp- 
shire (Feb. 20) come South Dakota (Feb- 
27), then the Colorado, Georgia and Mary- 
land primaries on March 5. Mr. Gr amm 
says, “If I get there as a viable candidate, 

[ win the nomination.” Next comes New 


York (March 7), South Carolina (March 9) 
and then Super Tuesday (March ] 2), most- 
ly in the South (Florida, Louisiana, Massa- 
chusetts, Oklahoma, Mississippi, Rhode 
Island, Tennessee and Texas). 

“There is no way,” Mr. Gramm says, 
“there will be more than two people stand- 
ing after Super Tuesday — in all probabili- 
ty there will be one." 

Washington wisdom holds that Mr. 
Gr amm 's slightly pc-adamic and grumpy de- 
meanor and Southwestern twang are nearly 
insuperable obstacles to a successful candi- 
dacy. But to a growing number of conserva- 
tives, who choose Republican nominees, he 
sounds melodious because of what he says. 

Congress's latc-scssion legislative calen- 
dar imparted momentum to Mr. Gramm’s 
courtship of the Republican nominating 
electorate. He was prominent in the light 
over the crime bill and was an important 
it to Clintonism in health care. 
6 rival for the n omina tion is apt to 
match Mr. Gramm's rhetorical gift for 
assuring Republicans that they need not 
fear from him another ni ghtmar e like the 
Bush administration. For example, “The 
Founding Fathers would be stunned that 
in 1994 two consenting adults can engage 
in any voluntary behavior, with constitu- 
tional protection, other than industry and 
commerce, or owning private property." 

A successful candidacy requires mon- 
ey, ideas and luck. Mr. Gramm probably 
will be the best financed and most conser- 
vative candidate in the Republican race. 
If luck is the residue of design, Mr. 
Gr amm is poised for a run of luck. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


History’s Balm for a Wounded First Lady 


B OSTON — What a heady 1 
time that was. Exactly a 
year ago, the headlines de- 
clared that Hillary had taken 
the Hill as if Congress were 
San Juan or Iwo Jima. 

She came, saw and wowed 
the place, answering every 
ition about the health care 
i she had shepherded to the 
>ilol door. The members 

MEANWHILE 

were in various stages of awe. 
The media was in full gush. 
Under the spotlight, under 
pressure, she was a pro. 

But lately Hillary Clinton's 
schedule is a list of photo op- 
portunities — a day care cen- 
ter, a children’s hospital 
On Monday, when health 
care reform was officially de- 
clared dead, she wasn’t even 
asked for a eulogy. On Tues- 
day, she was busy escorting 
Mrs. Yeltsin. 

These have to be hard times 
for the president's wife, the 
woman-in-ber-own-right, the 
confident lawyer. Through the 
campaign and the early days of 
the administration when Hilla- 
ry Rodham Clinton was the 
target of as much vitriol as I 
have ever seen, she took com- 


By Ellen Goo dman 


fort in thinking about Eleanor 
Roosevelt's strength under fire. 
Moments before she went into 
the congressional hearing 
room last year, an aide whis- 
pered to Hfllaiy, “This is Elea- 
nor Roosevelt time.” 

Hillary chose Eleanor as 
her role model while she was 
clearing a new path for wom- 
en in the White House. But 
who will she look to now, at a 
moment of defeat, a time 
when the most secure of us 
would feel shaken and un- 
sure? Well how about Elea- 
nor Roosevelt? 

I am told that the Clintons 
have a copy of Doris Kearns 
Goodwin’s new book, “No 
Ordinary Time,” on their 
night table. I hope so. It chal- 
lenges the view that most of us 
have of Eleanor the Icon who 
moved from the ugly duckling 
of her childhood to the strong 
woman in the White House. 
In real life, Eleanor Roosevelt 
faced continual crises and had 
to reinvent her role no less 
than three times as first lady. 

When Franklin Roosevelt 
was elected in 1932, his wife 
was terrified that she would be 
locked into a ceremonial role. 


condemned to the one thing 
she couldn't bear, feeling use- 
less. Again in 1940, when the 
prospects of war drew Frank- 
lin to foreign policy, Eleanor's 
working partnership in the 
New Deal was threatened. Fi- 
nally, when the war broke out, 
Eleanor took the first govern- 
ment job ever held by a first 
lady, at the Office of Civil De- 
fense. When it blew up in her 
face, she had to reinvent her 
role again. 

The times are different, of 
course. So are their psyches 
and their marriages. But Hi- 
lary shares with her predeces- 
sor the need for a sense of 
purpose in life. 

The Clintons came into of- 
fice with experience ns working 
partners. They bdieved that 
they had the people behind 
health care reform and all they 
needed was the policy. In the 
too-secret, loo-expert, too- 
Beltway process of creating the 
policy, they lost the people. 

They can blame it on grid- 
lock, on Republicans, on the 
media. Fair enough. But it was 
also bungled. I would be sur- 
prised if Hillary didn't share 
a sense of failure. Where do 


you go after you've walked 
mto a propeller? 

When a wounded Eleanor 
resigned from the Office of 
GvD Defense, she was at her 
lowest moment Gradually, she 
found her work again, and 
went from being an inside 
player to an outside agitator. 
As Mr.Goodwin puts it “She 
became a voice for people who 
didn’t have access to the sys- 
tem.” She brought that voice to 
FDR when it was welcome and 
when it wasn’t She helped tbc 
country change. 

Today, more Americans 
feel voiceless, angry, alienat- 
ed. If there's a role to be filled, 
it is hearing and raising that 
outside voice. 

If Hillary Clinton chooses, 
as hinted, to focus on children, 
it won’t be pboto ops for long. 
The well-being of American 
children is at the matrix of pri- 
vate anxieties and public poli- 
cies. She has the power and the 
voice to make that case. 

In this era, women are rou- 
tinely called upon to rewrite 
the script of their lives. Hillaiy 
Rodham Clinton has done it 
before. She’ll do it again. 

It's still Eleanor Roosevelt 
time. 

C 1 Boston Globe Newspaper Ox 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Kashmir's Long Crisis 

The New York Times editori- 
al “India's Dirty Little War” 
(Sept. 7) shows a lade of per- 
spective regarding Sooth Aria. 
It refers to a UN resolution 


for holding a plebiscite in ' 
mir. The resolution had three 
parts: enforcement of a cease- 
fire in Jamm u and Kashmir: 
withdrawal of Pakistani forces 
and reestablishment of admin- 
istrative control by the govern- 
ment of Jammu Kashmir 
over areas vacated by the de- 
parting troops, and initiation of 
a process for holding a plebi- 
scite with UN observers. 

Instead of pulling out its 
forces, however, Pakistan inte- 
grated about 3,300 square miles 
(8,500 square kilometers) of 
Kashmir territory into Pakistan 
and even traded about 12,000 
square miles of Kashmir land 
with the Chinese in return for 
arms. Under the circumstances, 
the Jammu and Kashmir gov- 
ernment could do only one 
thing: ascertain the will of the 
people. Tins was done by call- 
ing a. sovereign constituent as- 
sembly elected on the basis of 
universal franchise. That as- 
sembly decided to make the 
state of Jammu and Kashmir an 
integral part of India. It also 
made tbc accession clause irrev- 
ocable. 

Pakistan never implemented 
the UN resolution for with- 
drawing its troops from the ar- 
eas of Jammu and Kashmir it 
occupied forcibly. Instead, it in- 
vaded India twice, in 1965 and 
1971. After the 1965 war, an 
agreement was signed by the 
two countries, and after 1971 an 
agreement was signed as wdl. 
Under the latter, India returned 
to Pakistan 5,000 square miles 
of territory under its occupa- 
tion and Pakistan accepted the 
line of actual control in Jammu 
and Kashmir and promised to 
solve all the issues between the 
two countries “bilaterally.” 

Once again, however, Paki- 
stan did not honor its interna- 
tional commitments. It began a 
low-profile proxy war by send- 
ing in infiltrators trained by Pa- 
los rani Army instructor and 
armed with sophisticated 
American weapons given to Pa r 
kistan for use in Afghanistan. 
The infil trators killed a large 
number of innocent people and 
burned a lot of property, 
schools and colleges. More than 
300,000 Hindus were driven out 
of their native land. 

The editorial calls on the 
Clinton administration to be 
more evenhanded in de al i n g 
with the nations of South Asia, 
a welcome piece of advice. 
What about Pakistan, after its 
brazen confession of stockpil- 
ing nuclear weapons? Why not 
advise the Clinton administra- 


tion to ask Islamabad to accept 
inspection by the International 
Atomic Energy Agency? What 
about America’s well-known 
tilt in favor of Pakistan? 

S.N.DHAR. 

New Delhi. 

Sunanda K_ Datta-Ray de- 
scribes the problems of the Indi- 
an economy with great perspicu- 
ity in “Can India Rise to Meet 
East Asia’s Challenge?" (Opin- 
ion, Sept. 9). But the writer fails 
to mention the mlossfll drain on 
India's economy that is being 
caused by the continuing Indian 
occupation of Jammu and Kash- 
mir. Moreover, the brutalities 
bring perpetrated by Indian se- 
curity forces in Kashmir do not 
speak wdl for India, The sooner 
India allows sdf-detennination 
for the Kashmiri people, the bet- 
ter it will be for India. What the 
Indian government is doing in 
Kashmir is indeed 
a “march of faHy." 

JAMIL D.DADABHOY. 

Karachi, Pakistan. 

Advice far America 

The recent population con- 
ference in Cairo seems to have 
come up with useful guidelines 
for family planning policies, 
namely that women should be 
involved in the derision-mak- 
ing process at all levels, that 
there must be broad dissemi- 
nation of information and 
wide, accessible choice of 
methods of family planning. 

These discoveries, however, 
should be applied not only in so- 
called Hard World countries 
where population pressures and 
economic development are on a 
collision course. They are equal- 
ly important in the United 
States, which in some respects, 
including family planning, is 
also a Third World country. The 
lack of sex education, the high 
rate of teenage pregnancy and 
the high incidence of abortion 
testily to the failure of family 
planning. America must im- 
prove its record and follow 
through on the population con- 
ference’s recommendations. 

LAETTOA de KAJJTER. 

Gryon, Switzerland. 

It’s Not Bad Staff 

Regarding “ Cm des Ptoli- 
m&es Has an Image Problem : All 
Its Years Are Lousy ” (Sept. 26): 

Having happily guzzled my 
way through at least half a bottle 
a day of the white and ros6 ver- 
sion of Cru des Ptolfemtes during 
several recent holidays in Egypt, 
I can only conclude that your 
correspondent and his various 
witnesses are vinicultural wimps. 
It’s good stuff. Fve had far worse 
in Italy, Spain and, yes. even 
France — and neither my head 
nor my stomach complained. 

DAVID WOODS. 

Geneva. 


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I 

l 


Page 6 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


BALTIC SEA TRAGEDY / 


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Auto Femes Are Vulnerable 
Because of Open-Deck Design 


By Barry James 

International Herald Tribune 

Roll-on, roll-off ships like the 
Baltic ferry Estonia have an in- 
herently unstable design, ac- 
cording to maritime experts. 

They have hup doors front 
and rear to allow cars and 
trucks to drive on and off. The 
decks are large open hangars 
and they lack the internal bulk- 
heads of conventional freight- 
ers. 

One result is that a relatively 
small amount of water on the 
car deck can rapidly destabilize 
the ships. 

The British-owned Herald of 
Free Enterprise flipped onto its 
side and 188 people died ofT 
Zeebrugge in March 1987 after 
it left harbor with the bow 
doors open. Water came in as 
the ship was turning, and it 
sank within seconds. 


Did the same thing happen to 
the Estonia in the storm-driven 
waters of the Baltic Sea? The 
only evidence to this effect 
came from a crew member who 
said he saw on a TV monitor 
water coming through the door 
onto the car deck. 

International safety stan- 
dards introduced since the sink- 
ing of the Herald of Free Enter- 
prise have set progressively 
stricter safety standards. 

There are two separate sets of 
standards — one for Northwest 
Europe and a less stringent one 
for the rest of the world. This 
means that a ferry considered 
unfit for the English Channel 
could continue to operate in 
some other countries. 

The safety standards are ex- 
pressed as coefficients. 

Although it was built before 
the standards were adopted, die 
Estonia had a high coefficient 


Cheap Estonia Goods 
Lure Swedish Visitors 


Agenee France- Prone 

STOCKHOLM — Swedish tourists, who made up about 
half of the passengers on board the Estonian car ferry that 
sank off Finland on Wednesday, have been attracted to 
Estonia for inexpensive shopping trips since the collapse or 
the Soviet Union. 

Estonia has become a tourist destination since regaining 
independence from Moscow in 1991 by offering cheap goods 
such as vodka to travelers from neighboring countries. Prosti- 
tution has also been burgeoning. 

The Swedes, taking advantage of a favorable exchange rate 
against the currency of Estonia, where living standards are 
markedly lower, regularly take day cruises to Tallinn, the 
capital, where they also buy food, cigarettes, clothes and 
leather goods at competitive prices. 

Tallinn is the closest foreign capital to Stockholm, located 
320 kilometers (200 miles) across the Baltic Sea. Swedish 
newspapers are full of advertisements from tour operators 
offering cut-price trips to the Baltic republic. 


of 95 percent, according to Bu- 
reau Veritas, the Pans-based 
classification society responsi- 
ble for monitoring ships safety. 

This meant that it was autho- 
rized to continue passenger op- 
erations in the Baltic without 
major modifications until 3999. 

Veritas last inspected the Es- 
tonia in January 1994, pro- 
nouncing it fit to receive an In- 
ternational Passenger Safety 
Certificate: The company regu- 
larly surveyed the snip during 
its constiuction in West Germa- 
ny, and since its launching in 
1980. 

Although the ship sank in a 
storm, experts said such rough 
weather should not have been a 
problem for a vessel of the Esto- 
nia's size and power. 

Under previous owners, it 
had served on the rough English 
Channel crossing before mov- 
ing to the Baltic as the Silja Star 
and then the Wasa King. The 
ship was renamed again after ■ 
the Estonian state bought a half 
share in 1991. 

A board of inquiry into the 
Herald of Free Enterprise trag- 


edy found that it was caused by 
“the - --- 


disease of sloppiness” in- 


fecting the operating company 
to bottom.** As a re- 


SOS! Survivors Tell of Fleeing Vessel 


^ Continued from Page 1 
pushing rafts into the water.** 


when the ship heeled over. “1 
got Out of bed and shouted to 


“There were lots of rafts in 
the water. One had turned over, 
and there were three of us lying 
on top. One was a completely 
naked man in his 50s. We spent 
six hours on there.** 

He said his sea training had 
probably saved his life. “I 
didn't panic,** he said. “I re- 
membered to pul on a life vest, f 
jumped at the right moment." 

“Many people didn’t wake 
up in time. Some were drinking 
and partying and were not in 
the best condition to cope.** 
Vijjho Itarama, a passenger 
in his 50s from Borlangem, 
Sweden, had just gone to bed 


my friend that we had to get 
upwards. 


out. I made my way 
with difficulty and jumped 
from the stern. 


“The first wave smashed me 
against the ship and I hit my 
head, but I managed to get hold 
of a rubber raft while two peo- 
ple were holding onto me and 
someone helped me onto the 
raft.” 


Mr. Kaik, the Estonian pas- 


senger, managed to cope. “The 


last we saw of the Estonia,” he 
said, “was the bottom of her 
hull sliding swiftly beneath the 

(AP. Reuters) 


waves. 


“from top 
suit, ferry companies in Britain 
and elsewhere were ordered to 
review their operating proce- 
dures. 

Roger Kohn, spokesman for 
the International Maritime Or- 
ganization in London, said that 
operators “don't mess around" 
with the roll-on, roll-off ferries, 
because they are aware of the 
danger posed by “a huge open 
car deck with doors at each 
end.” 

“There have not been too 
many accidents because they 
are operated with such care," 
Mr. Kohn said. 

As a result of the Herald of 
Free Enterprise disaster, the 
maritime agency adopted a se- 
ries of safety amendments in 
1988 relating to passenger fer- 
ries. 

The closure of cargo doors 
must now be noted in the ship's 
log. Ships must be surveyed ev- 
ery five years to ensure that 
their weight distribution has 
not been altered. And they must 
be equipped with electronic 
measuring instruments to check 
ship stability before departure. 
Most ships also have television 
monitors on the doors and bilge 
alarms. 

To make them more stable, 
the latest roll-on, roll-off ferries 
are equipped with a flotation 
ring, known as a sponson, 
around the hull. 

Governments and shipping 
companies have resisted refit- 
ting the ferry boats as exten- 
tivdy as many maritime offi- 
cials would like. 



Placid Sweden Reels 
From Worst Shock 
Since Palme’s Death 


Sri,*;. . «• ■ 

Rcuwi> 

Ferry survivors being helped by rescue workers Wednesday as they arrived in F inlan d. 


Ream 

STOCKHOLM — Swedes 
were stunned Wednesday by 
news that hundreds of their 
compatriots had died when the 
car ferry Estonia capsized and 
sank in the Baltic Sea. 

Not since Swedes heard on 
early-morning radio broadcasts 
eight years ago that their prime 
minister, Otof Palme, had been 
assassinated the night before 
has the country beat plunged 
into such deep shock. 

The death of about 500 citi- 
zens — the exact number is not 
yet known — is the worst single 
event to affeett Sweden in this 
century, according to histori- 
ans. ■ 

Sweden did not fight in either 
World War. 

Swedes from around the 
country were killed on a ferry 
known for its light-hearted at- 
mosphere. 

Trips on ferries like the Esto- 
nia, Where duty-free alcohol can 
be bought, have become known 
affectionately as “booze 
enuses." 

Many Swedes are familiar 


FERRY: Over 800 Die in Europe’s Worst Maritime Tragedy Since War 


Costumed from P*ge Z 
and then the storm could do 
anything it wants with the 
ship.” 

But Andres Berg, deputy 
chairman of the Swedish com- 
pany Nordstrom Jk Thulin, 
half-owner of the 15,600-ton 
ferry along with the Estonian 
state, said the ferry should have 
been able to drift without en- 
gines, even in very rough sea. 

As Estonia. Sweden and Fin- 
land ordered a full investigation 
into the disaster, Swedish mari- 
time safety officials said a seal 
that made the loading ramp wa- 
tertight was found to be “unsat- 
isfactory** during an inspection 
a day before the disaster. 

Two Swedish inspectors, in 
Estonia to teach ferry safety 
techniques, had visited the ship 
before it left Tallinn as part of a 
(raining exercise. Johan Fran- 
son,. deputy director of the 
Swedish Maritime Authority, 
said. 

“They had opinions on the 
ramp, namely that the seal was 
not in satisfactory condition," a 
seamen's union leader, Anders 
Lindstrom, told the Swedish 
news agency Tidningamas Te- 

legrambyra. 

But Mr. Franson said: “They 
formed the opinion that the Es- 
tonia was, on the whole, a well- 
kept ship." 


“Some of the deficiencies 
were noted. One of the deficien- 
cies was a deficiency to the seal 
of the bow door. But our judg- 
ment is that the deficiency in 
the seal could not cause the ship 
to capsize and sink. Something 
else should have happened" 
The seals, located along the 
edges of the cargo doors, are 
designed to keep water out dur- 
ing rough seas. But Mr. Fran- 


son said that even if there had 
been a leak, there were drams 
on the deck to allow water to 
run off. 

The ship, which could bold 
up to 2,000 people and 460 cars, 
had four or five bars, shops, 
three restaurants, gambling ma- 
chines, a sauna and a swimming 
pool. 

Many of the missing were 
feared to have gone down with 


the ship after bring caught in 
their bunks when the ferry sank 
within 15 minutes. 

Experts said the swiftness of 
the eapshring meant that few 

did wouldltave perished^from 
the cold. 

“Many of the passengers - 
were certainly in their cabins 
asleep, and as the boat [would 


asleep, and as tbe boat [would 
have] stink very quickly, i t must 
have been very difficult for 


Recent Shipping Disasters 


The Axsrtiiutrd Press 

There have been a number of marine disasters in recent 
years: 

• March 28. 1993 — 175 die when a ferry capsizes in the 
Telulia River in Bangladesh. 

• Dec. 21, 1992 — About 380 Haitians drown as a refugee 
boat sinks off Great fnagua Island in the Bahamas. 

• Dec. 14, 1991 — More than 460-passengers and crew 
members die after, a coral reef tears a hole in a ferry’s side near 
the port of Bur Safaga, Egypt. 

• Aug. 8, 1988 — As many aS 400 drown in India when a 
ferry capsizes in the Ganges River. 

• Dec. 20, 1987 — 1,749 drown when the ferry Doha Paz 
collides with the tanker MT Victor in the Philippines. 

• March 6, 1987 — 189 die when water rushes through the 
open bow doors of the Herald of Free Enterprise, causing the 
British ferry to capsize off the Belgian port of Zeebrugge: 

• May, 1986 — 262 are killed as overcrowded ferry sinks in 
the Sandhya River near Brisat, Bangladesh. 

• Jan. 27. 198 1 — 580 are killed when the Indonesian ship 
Tampon as II catches fire and sinks in the Java Sea. 


very 

many to get out," a Finnish 
-navy commander, Raimo Ttili- 
kainen, said. 

Those thrown into the sea 
would not have lasted more 
than a few hours in the frigid 
waters, experts said. 

Many lifeboats overturned in 
the rough sea after the ferry, on 
a regular trip from Tallinn to 
Stockholm, sank before rescue 
vessels could reach it. • 

The car and passenger ferry 
sen t a, brief Mayday durtresssig- 
nal at 2324 GMT, saying ft had 
developed a severe list in waves 
from 7 to 10 meters (20 to 30 
feet) high. 

: Prime Minister Carl Bildt of 
Sweden said at a joint news 
conference with his Estonian 
and Finnish counterparts in 
Turku, the center of rescue op- 
erations, that ihe Estonia had 
been inspected regularly with 
no complaints. 


with the dancing, shows and 
late-night drinking on board 
ferries that cross from Sweden 
to Finland dr the Baltic states 
and back again. 

In a country of only 8.5 mil- 
lion people, a large chunk of the 
population will know, or know 
of, one of the victims. 

Prime Minister Cad Bildt 
said at a press conference 
Wednesday that he knew sever- 
al people who were aboard the 
sbip- 

Sweden’s king, Carl XVJ 
Gustaf, made a rare television 
appearance to read a brief state- 
ment expressing his sorrow. 

Just a few of a group of 19 
young evangelists returning 
from a Bible study tour of Esto- 
nia survived, and just three out 
of a group of 70 Stockholm po- 
licemen attending a conference 
will return home. 

“It’s almost too hard to take 
in. Five hundred people," said 
Annike, a 17-year-old student, 
as she strolled with friends in 
central Stockholm. 

Swedes, self-confessed intro- 
verts not known for baring their 
souls, appeared grim through- 
out the day, and the country’s 
extensive social-support system 
swung into action. 

On breakfast television, 
where many Swedes caught 
thrir first news of the tragedy; a 
minister sat beside' the regular 
host. - - 

Ministers, relatively absent in 
secular Sweden, were seen all 
day oh television screens: .. 

The ferry terminal of ~Fri— 
hamn, where the Estoniashould 
have landed, was devoid of 
ships but packed with several 
hundred people anxious --for. 
news of relatives who had .been 
bn the ferry. ' : 

Dozens of ministers and psy- 
chologists counseled the tearful 
relatives as : they waited to find ' 
out if thrir loved ones were, 
among the survivors. 7 

Asked about the relevance of . 
counseling, a psychologist- re- : 
‘ “You .have- to reahzeiwe' 


small-children drawingpic- 
lures of Otof Palme's Tt&SwFjr- 


long -time' after tbe event.”.. ./ 
Telephone, lines werebpened 
for Swedes to phone ur and 
“talk out” thrir anxieti estover 
the ferry sinking. .. . i 

Sociologists said that Mr. 
Palme’s assassination- at ; the : 
hands of an unknown killer had 
been a crushing blow for. a rela- 
tively naive society where vio- 
lence rarely occurs. 


dA : After the Ames Case, Congress Rethinks the cia MEXICO: Plague Cases Spread as Far as Calcutta 


Continued hum Page 1 
inside the agency, in February, 
the end of the Cold War raised 

tore mission. Some CLAofficers 
say they never have seen the 
agency more demoralized, or 
with so many good people look- 
ing to leave. 

Now, the agency's woes are 
reaching a potential critical 
mass. 

In dosed sessions of tbe Sen- 
ate and House intelligence com- 
mittees this week, R. James 
Woolsey Jr„ the director of cen- 
tral intelligence, will try to ex- 
plain the seemingly inexplica- 
ble: how Mr. Amis, a hard- 
drinking and self-destruct) vely 
sloppy spy. betrayed his coun- 
try undetected for right years 
after the CIA realized it had a 
traitor in its ranks. 

Many of Mr. Woolsey’s top 
aides — his director of covert 
operations, his deputy inspec- 
tor general, his London station 
-hief — and several recently re- 
tired barons of the CIA may 
have to be held publicly ac- 
countable for their failure to 
jay attention to the worst secu- 


rity breach in the agency’s his- 
tory. 

[Mr. Woolsey said Wednes- 
day that he was reprimanding 
11 former and current senior 
officials, including the agency's 
third-ranking officer, for bun- 
gling the Ames case, Reuters 
reported. Mr. Woolsey said the 


agency’s inspector general has 
ided that than was no 


concluded 
gross negligence or willful mis- 
conduct that could lead to crim- 
inal charges. 

[But he said thrir “lack of 
attention" to the search for a 
possible turncoat within the 
agency had “caused a disaster " 
He named only one of the offi- 
cials reprimanded. Hugh Price, 
the deputy director for opera- 
tions and the CIA's third-rank- 
ing official But he said Mr. 
Pnce was bring kept on.) 

“People have concluded that 
(he Ames story is representative 
of the agency," said a senior 
administration official. In other 
words, he said, the Ames case is 
not an aberration. It is a core 
sample of the CIA and it has 
exposed a structural dry rot 

within tbe agency. 


Tt’s worse than the Bay of 
Pigs," said Allen Goodman, a 
former CIA official. “The 
whole operation is threatened. 
both by a traitor and by its own 
bureaucratic culture. No inter- 
nal investigation within the 
agency is going to be seen as 
credible. The American way is 
to bring in an independent team 
and say: ‘What went on hereT " 

Just as the bungled 1961 in- 
vasion of Cuba stands as an 
emblem of failure, the Ames 
case has come to symbolize 
much that the CIA’s critics re- 
gard as wrong with the agency: 
its insularity, its questionable 
ability to police itself, its weari- 
ness at the end of the Cold War. 


“Throughout the Cold War, 
the nation needed a great intel- 
ligence service, and by and large 
it got one," said Mr. Goodman, 
academic dean of the School of 
Foreign Service at Georgetown 
University. “But from about 
1985 onward nobody’s been 
able to say if they are good or 
bad and from 1990 onward no- 
body’s been able to say exactly 
why we need them.” 


Party Aide Slain 

Contimed from Page 1 
with a semiautomatic weapon. 

Mexico's stock market, 
which had been rising, fell more 
than 3 percent after tbe shoot- 
ing; the value of the Mexican 
peso dropped slightly as well. 

Mr. Ruiz Massieu was elect- 
ed to Congress in August and 
had been chosen to head the 
party delegation that would 
dominate the newly elected 
lower house. 

He was governor of the state 
of Guerrero from 1987 until 
1993 and earlier held a variety 
Of posts within the party and 
state and federal governments. 

The party has governed Mex- 
ico since 1929. The post of sec- 


Reuten 

NEW DELHI — Plague cases multi- 
plied across India on Wednesday. 

In the western state of Maharashtra, 333 
new cases were reported. Maharashtra is 
south of the city of Surat, where the out- 
break erupted last week, and surrounds 
Bombay, with its population of about 13 
million. 

In a development that officials said was 
especially worrisome, seven confirmed 
plague victims surfaced in Calcutta and 
the surrounding region, 1,600 kilometers 


(1,000 miles) east of Surat An additional 
13 people there had plague symptoms. 

Calc u tta, with a population of 10.8 mil- 
lion, is considered one of India’s dirtiest 
cities, and authorities w ere concerned that 
the disease could spread quickly within its 
sprawling slums if urgent measures were 
not taken. 

More than 300,000 people left the city of 
Surat in panic after the first major out- 
break of plague in India since 1966 was 
declared last week, fleeing in all directions. 

Hundreds of people who took flight 


have since come down with high fever, 
cough and chest pains — symptoms of 
plague — and been isolated in hospitals m 
far-flung regions. 


Sixteen new cases of plague were regis- 
tered in New Delhi, bringing the total 
number of confirmed victims in the Indian 
capital to 18. 

Tim Delhi state health minister. Harsh 
Vardhan, said all of (he victims had recent- 
ly been to Surat and were responding fa- 
vorably to antibiotic treatment 


PLAGUE J Travelers May Be Held 


retaiy-generai is second only to 
f pa 


that of party president within 
the party. (AP. Reuters) 


Cuban Dancer Seeks Asylum 

Reuters 

MADRID — One of Cuba's 
best known dancers, Rosario 
Su&rez, has sought political asy- 
lum in Spain. 


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Continued from Page 1 
dans in close contact with the 
disease. 

The plague vaccine requires 
frequent booster shots and pro- 
duces unpleasant side effects, 
including some symptoms of 
the disease itself, the spokes- 
man said. He added that people 
going to an epidemic area, or 
likely to be in contact with 
plague victims, can take antibi- 
otics as a preventive measure. 
Antibiotics also are effective in 
curing the disease. 

Lacking hygiene, medical 
care and medicines, people in 
Sum, the western Indian city 
most severely stricken by 
plague, have been fleeing — jus’t 
as people did in medieval Eu- 
rope in the face of epidemics 


Abdoulaye Named in Niger 

Agence France- Prase 

NIAMEY, Niger — Presi- 
dent Mahamane 0 us mane ap- 
pointed Souley Abdoulaye as 
Niger's new prime minister 
Wednesday, after Mahamadou 
Issoufou resigned, national ra- 
dio said. Mr. Abdoulaye. 38. 
was the president's campaign 
manager in last year's election 
and has been trade, transport 
and tourism minister through- 
out the coalition government's 
18 months in power. 


tnti 


Seo Our 

motional fcocruifmonT 


evety Thursday 


that left the living outnumbered 
by the dead. 

Doctors said this flight had 
helped spread the plague to oth- 
er areas, particularly to the port 
city of Bombay. Authorities re- 
ported plague cases multiplying 
across India on Wednesday, 
both in the region surrounding 
Bombay in the west and as far 
away as Calcutta in the east 

In all, nearly 1,000 Indians 
have been stricken by plague in 
its bubonic or pneumonic form. 
Bubonic plague causes internal 
bleeding and swellings in the 
armpit and groin known as bu- 
boes. It is carried by rats and 
transmitted to humans by fleas. 
The more virulent pneumonic 
plague attacks the lungs and 
spreads through respiratory in- 
fection rather than flea bites. 

Even before the Black Death 
swept through Europe in the 
14th century, rumors “told of a 
death toll so devastating that all 
India was said to be depopulat- 
ed, whole territories covered by 
dead bodies,” according to the 
historian Barbara Tuchman. 
Plague outbreaks have repeat- 
edly devastated the subconti- 
nent, most recently in 1966. 

Tbe WHO spokesman said 
that with improvements in hy- 
giene and medical care, plague 
has become relatively rare, with 
about 1,500 cases reported 
around the world each year. Of 
reported cases, about 10 per- 
cent are fatal, he said. 

Epidemiologists say the cur- 
rent outbreak in India may have 
been transmitted from rats that 
were driven from their usual 
habitats by a major earthquake 
east of Bombay last year. 



IH 


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4 


hotter* 


Mother Teresa arriving Wednesday in Rome from infia. 
Hie airport employee who poshed the mxssonaiy’s wheel- 




7 


. — - — — f.- - — 






I 


M U‘«** 

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The Stage is Set for 


The Greatest Cast of 


World Players Ever 


Assembled 


in China 



The International Herald Tribune and The State Commission for Restructuring The Economic Systems Present 

The 1995 China Summit 

APRIL 10 - 12 1995 - BEIJING 

Once again, the International Herald Tribune and the State Commission for the people who are driving China's economic direction into the next millnni,.- 
Restructuring the Economic Systems of the PRC are inviting the world's business * If your corporation has a stake in the future of the Chinese economy, 
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can work together in order to promote better understanding between China and 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


HEALTH /SCIENCE 


! In Insects, Extremes of Specialization 


By Carol Kaesuk Yoon 

.Yen' York Times Service 

EW YORK — Scientists have 
long known that insect species 
can hone their skills over evo- 
lutionary time to become ex- 
pert at attacking a single species of 
plants. 

Now, in a series or studies, researchers 
are finding that insects take their spe- 
cializations to surprising extremes, be- 
coming highly adapted to eating not just 
plants of a particular species but specific 
plants. 

So fine-tuned are these pests that they 
can fail to thrive even on plants of the 
same species growing as little as a few 
feel away from the one they are adapted 
to. 

The discovery of this evolution of eat- 
ing preferences has helped explain the 
long-puzzling observation that some 
plants can be devastated by voracious 
insect pests while others of the same 
species, some dose enough to have their 
branches entwined in their beleaguered 
neighbors', remain virtually untouched. 

Researchers say the studies also pro- 
vide new insights into the evolutionary 
race between insect pests and the plants 
they attack, revealing both how quickly 
insects adapt to their hosts and how 


variable plants' defenses can be. At the 
same time, the work has signaled the 
importance of maintaining heterogene- 
ity in crops as a means of preventing 
pest outbreaks. 

'This is about as fine-scale as you can 
get in natural systems,” said Dr. Susan 
Mopper, an insect ecologist at the Uni- 
versity of Southwestern Louisiana in La- 
fayette. “These are examples of very rap- 
id evolution and genetic differentiation. 
It is something that occurs within the life 
of the host plant, so it's an example of 
evolution almost right before our eyes." 

Dr. Sharon Y. Strauss, an ecologist at 
the University of California at Davis, 
said, “To think if you lake a large step 
you might be looking at two entirely 
differentiated insect populations — 1 
think that was a pretty big surprise, that 
adaptation could result in differentiation 
even at these very small distances.” 

So far, researchers have found moths, 
flies, scale insects and thrips that are 
adapted to eating particular plants, and 
some scientists think the phenomenon 
may turn out to be widespread. 

The suggestion that insects could adapt 
to feast on individual host plants was first 
put forth almost 20 years ago in a paper 
by Dr. George F. Edmunds Jr., a retired 
biologist who was then a professor at the 
University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and 


Dr. Donald Alstad, an ecologist at the 
University of Minnesota. The researchers 
found that tiny insea pests of ponderosa 
pine, known a$ black pineleaf scales, 
seemed to thrive only on the tree from 
which they originated. 

The suggestion that these needle-suck- 
ing bugs could have adapted so quickly as 
to home in on an individual tree intrigued 
ecologists, who then went in search of 
more examples. But when early attempts 
to find similar specialization in other in- 
sects failed, the hypothesis of so-called 
“local adaptation” to individual host 
plants began to fall from favor. 

Most of the researchers involved in the 
new' studies said they began thdr work 
expecting not to find support for the 
hypothesis. T thought it would be the 
final nail in the coffin for the idea," said 
Dr. Larry Hanks, an insea ecologist at 
the University of California at Riverside 
who, with Dr. Robert Denno, an ecolo- 
gist at the University of Maryland in 
College Park, found evidence For local 
adaptation in insects known as white 
peach scale on mulberry trees. 

The new studies are also helping to 
identify the rules that govern which in- 
sects can and cannot adapt and are giving 
clues to why the phenomenon may have 
eluded researchers in the past. 

Dr. Richard Karban, an ecologist at 


the University of California at Davis, is 
credited with providing one of the best 
demonstrations of insect adaptation to an 
individual plant, in this case tiny bugs 
called thrips and a shrub known as the 
seaside daisy. The thrips, which are about 
the size of the commas in this sentence, 
feed by rasping the plants' leaves and 
flowers. 

By brin ging denes of the daisy into the 
laboratory and growing thrips on both 
their original plant and on others of the 
species, Dr. Karban was able to show that 
these insects thrived on the original plant 
and did poorly on the other ones. 

Dr. Karban said the thrips, like other 
insec ts thnr have evolved to feed on indi- 
vidual plants, appear able to achieve such 
specialization at least in part because of 
thdr rapid rate of reproduction as com- 
pared with the plants'. 

The same seaside daisy sits for tens or 
hundreds of years on the same spot 
Meanwhile, the parthenogenetic thrips 
on the plant are doing evolutionary cart- 
wheels, with as many as eight generations 
produced in a single year, and with natu- 
ral sdection working its magic on every 
new round of offspring. “So each individ- 
ual plant is going to be sitting prey for 
many, many generations of these very, 
very short-lived insects,” said Dr. Kar- 
ban. 



fHfei 

A * ! -y 








Di Mopper. u--v* Onmld N Akin! 


Leaf larvae chomp on oak leaf: inset, black pineleaf scale at work. 


Mysteries of Aging: Do Some Biological Clocks Tick Faster? 


By Sandra Blakeslee 

New York Tunes Service 

EW YORK — Among the many 
surprises at school reunions is 
that people seem to age at differ- 
ent rates. 

Researchers say these varied appear- 
ances, while partly due to diet and living 
habits, may also have a deeper biological 
explanation than previously thought: 
some men and women may actually age 
faster than others. Their external features 
and internal organs may be biologically 
older than their chronological age. 

Support for this hypothesis comes from 
a study of women under Lhe age of 35 who 
have given birth to babies with Down's 


syndrome, a form of meatal retardation 
usually associated with older mothers. 
Younger women who have babies with the 
syndrome are five times as likely to devel- 
op Alzheimer's disease later in life as are 
women in the same age group who give 
birth to babies with other developmental 
disorders, the study found. 

One explanation is that these young 
women may be experiencing “accelerated 
aging,” said Dr. Nicole Schupf. an epidemi- 
ologist at the New York State Institute for 
Basic Research in Developmental Disabil- 
ities and lead author of the study, which 
appeared in The Lancet, a British medical 
journal. While the mother of a baby bom 
with Down's syndrome may be only 25. Dr. 
Schupf said, her eggs may be equivalent to 
those of a 40-vear-old woman. 


“This study is enormously important 
and fascinating,'' said Dr. James Morti- 
mer, an Alzheimer’s disease expert, neu- 
rologist and epidemiologist at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota. 

Dr. Schupf said that she and other re- 
searchers had long been intrigued by the 
association between Down's syndrome 
and Alzheimer's disease. Babies who have 
Down’s syndrome are bom with three 
copies of chromosome 21. which contains 
the gene for amyloid protein. 

In Alzheimer's disease, amyloid protein 
breaks down in the brain to form dense 
plaques that interfere with thinking and 
memory processes. Nearly all Down's syn- 
drome patients who live into their 40s 
develop Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Schupf 


said. The reason may be “dose related,” 
she said, in that those with the syndrome, 
all of whom have three amyloid genes, 
produce more of the proton than other 
people and hence are prone to developing 
Alzheimer’s disease. 

Similarly, a dozen studies have suggest- 
ed that families with a high incidence of 
Alzheimer's disease also have an increased 
tendency to produce children with Down’s 
syndrome. Dr. Schupf said. 

“This, too, could be a form of acceler- 
ated aging.” Dr. Schupf said, lhe forma-' 
tion of amyloid plaques may be a normal 
process of aging, she said, and if people 
lived to be 100, they might all develop 
Alzheimer’s disease. But most people die 
of other diseases long before such plaques 
interfere with mental processes. In this 


view, she said, Alzheimer’s disease that 
strikes people in their 60s, 70s or 80s would 
be a sign of accelerated aging. 

These observations formed the basis of 
* Dr. Schupf s research, which was carried 
out with Dr. Richard Mayeux. director of 
the Gertrude Sergievsky Center for the 
Study of Nervous System Disorders at 
Columbia University’s College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons in New York. 

If there is a genetic basis for accelerated 
aging, the researchers wondered, would it 
show up as an increased risk of having a 
baby with Down’s syndrome before age 35 
and an increased risk of developing Alz- 
heimer’s disease later in life? 

To explore the question, the researchers 
recruited 96 adults with Down’s syndrome 
and their families, plus another 80 adults 


with other developmental disabilities and 
their families. More than half the mothers 
were under 35 when they gave birth. By 
looking at retarded adults and their moth- 
ers and fathers, the researchers hoped to be 
able to explore health problems among the 
older generation, including the incidence 
of Alzheimer's disease. 

The results were statistically powerful. 
Dr. Schupf said. Mothers under 35 who 
gave birth to babies with Down's syn- 
drome five times the risk of developing 
Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young 
age as younger mothers who gave birth to 
children with other forms of meatal retar- 
dation. Mothers 35 and older who had 
babies with Down's syndrome did not run 
an increased risk of developing early Alz- 
heimer’s disease. 


IN BRIEF 

Yet Another Study Backs 
Virtue of Moderate Drinking 

NEW YORK (NYT) — A study pub- 
lished Wednesday suggests that a moder- 
ate consumption of alcohol might protea 
against the formation of dangerous blood 
.clots.that lead to heart attacks. 

The finding appears to explain in part 
the observations in many previous studies 
that moderate drinking, defined as one or 
two drinks a day, was associated with a 
reduced risk of heart attacks. 

The study, which appears in The Jour- 
nal of the American Medical Association, 
was based on blood tests of 631 healthy 
doctors. 

The researchers measured levels of an 
naturally occurring enzyme that helps 
play a role in the body's system of break- 
ing down blood clots. 

It found that the highest levels of the 
enzyme, endogenous tissue-type plasmin- 
ogen activator or TPA, were found 
among those who drank alcohol daily, 
with the lowest levels found among non- 
drinkers. 


Gene Tests: Should Children Be Told They Risk Disease? 


By Gina Kolata 

JVw York Times Sen-ice 

EW YORK — In their fevered 
race to isolate the breast cancer 
gene, researchers often discov- 
— — ered. through indirect tests, 
which relatives of affected women also had 
the gene — and an 85 percent chance of 
developing the disease. Many of those rela- 
tives were children. 

The question of what to do with the 
information when children were involved 
was vexing, and some investigators refused 
to tell the families what they knew. 

The refusal angered many parents, who 
argued, to no avail, that it was their right to 
have medical information about thdr chil- 
dren. But many of the geneticists felt that 
the children should not be told because 
nothing could be done to prevent the dis- 
ease. Increasingly, the geneticists are asking, 
whose right it is to make that decision? 

That question is becoming more press- 


ing as researchers find more ways to identi- 
fy who is at risk of developing painful 
deadly diseases. The problem, scientists 
and ethidsts say, is that far more is known 
about predicting these ailments than pre- 
venting or treating them. And they worry 
that the knowledge of future illness could 
be too great a burden for some children 
and parents to bear. 

“There are many more children that are 
going to face this issue, and many more 
conditions,” said Dr. Arthur Coplan, di- 
rector of the Center for Bioethics at the 
University of Pennsylvania. “I think there 
will be tremendous pressure” on parents to 
have their children tested, he added. 

So far. about 900 genes have been found 
that can cause genetic diseases, and the 
heated race to identify even more contin- 
ues as part of the Human Genome Project 
to map genes. 

A few of the genes, including the breast 
cancer gene whose discovery was an- 
nounced this month, have beat found so 
recently that no tests are available. But it is 


generally no more than a year or two 
between the discovery of a gene and the 
development of a test that can foretell 
whether someone is likely to develop a 
serious disease. 

. Dr. Barbara Weber of the University of 
Pennsylvania School of Medicine; who was 
one of those involved in the search for the 
breast cancer gene, said she and her col- 
leagues decided that they would tell only 
those 18 or older who had asked whether the 
gene was present. Dr. Weber said she was 
afraid to give children and teenagers infor- 
mation that might lead them to believe that 
“they were side, that their breasts were 
somehow or other going to kill them.” 

But Dr. Mary Z. Petias, a professor of 
genetics and a lawyer at Louisiana State 
University, said it should not be for ethidsts 
and geneticists to decide what information 
will b6 available. “The final decisions 
should rest with the parents,” she said. 

The Human Genome Project, sponsored 
by the U.S. government, is surveying 
adults in families where at least one person 


has an inherited genetic disease, and advo- 
cacy groups for people with genetic disor- 
ders are staking out positions. “This is 
what I call the ragged edge of the genetics 
and moral community,” said Dr. Charles 
R. Scriver, a geneticist at Montreal Chil- 
dren’s HospitaL “There are no clear guide- 
lines” 

Dr. Dorothy C. Wertz, a senior scientist 
at the Shriver Center for Mental Retarda- 
tion in Waltham. Massachusetts, and a 
member of the genetics society committee 
that is trying to come up with a statement, 
argues that children must be protected 
from the information. 

In a paper that appears in the the Jour- 
nal of the American Medical Association, 
she proposed that testing be readily avail- 
able only when a direct medical benefit to 
the child could result 

Conditions that could be prevented or 
treated if deteaed in childhood include 
familial hypercholesterolemia, which 
causes extraordinarily high cholesterol lev- 


els. Diet and drugs can help counter the 
disease. 

Dr. Wertz said in an interview that she is 
distressed by the cavalier attitude of many 
doctors and families toward the notion of 
testing children and adolescents. 

“A lot of people think that knowledge is 
good in itself, and they also think that 
medicine is benign,” Wertz said. “They arc 
not aware of the dangers to a child's self- 
esteem. and dangers that they may view 
the child differently." 

And, in fact there are many instances 
where children have been psychologically 
harmed by testing. Mary Ann Wilson, the 
administrative director of a support group 
in I-anham, Maryland, for sufferers of a 
disfiguring disease, neurofibromatosis, 
told of a 9-year-old boy in Baltimore who 
tested positive for the gene for the disease. 

That meant that he would develop tu- 
mors along his nerves, some of which could 
be malignant- His family. Ms. Wilson said, 
“ostracized” the boy to such an extent that 
he was put in a foster home. 



By Alan Truscott 

O NE of the most experi- 
enced players in the Euro- 
pean Junior Team Champion- 
ship in Arnhem, the 
Netherlands, was Alfredo Ver- 
sace of Italy, who was a mem- 
ber of the European team that 
played in the Generali match 
against the United States. In 
Arnhem, he held the South 
cards on the diagramed deal 
and reached a shaky game. His 
aggresive rebid of two spades 
was artificial and the two no- 
trump response showed a mini- 
mum. 

West led the spade seven, 
since that suit bad not really 
been bid. South tried the nine 
from dummy, losing to the king, 
and East shifted to the diamond 
king. When that held, he tried a 
club, and South finessed. West 
won and tried to cash the dia- 
mond ace. Versace ruffed and 
thought his task was easy. He 
planned to cash two rounds of 
trumps ending in dummy, niff 
the last diamond, cross to the 
spade ace and draw the missing 
trump. He would then have 
four trump tricks, two niffs, 
three club tricks and a spade. 


But when he cashed the heart 
queen and led to the ace. he had 
to think again. There was a so- 
lution. ana he found it by ruff- 
ing the last diamond and finess- 
ing the spade jack. Then he 
cashed the spade ace and 
played clubs. West's 10-8 of 
trumps were trapped in a coup 
position under dummy’s K.-9. 
Whether he ruffed the third 
round or not, Versace’s game 
was safe. 


NORTH fD) 

* A J 9 j 

7 A K !l i< 

O J 62 
*J9 

EAST 
OKA 
7 J 

C K Q 9 8 
+86432 
SOUTH 

* 86 3 2 
T Q 6 4 2 

3 

* A Q 10 7 


WEST 
+ Q tO 7 
7 10 8 7 S 
v A 10 5 4 
* KS 


Neither sMp wjs vulnerable. The 
bidding: 


Nonh 

EaM 

South 

West 

1 * 

Pass 

i •: 

Pass 

7V 

Pass 

2 + 

Pass 

2 N.T. 

Pass. 

3 •? 

Pa«« 

4C 

Pass 

Pa** 

Pass 


West led the .spade seven 


MOSAIC: Memoirs 

By Lincoln Kirstein Illustrated. 
270 pages. S25. Farrar. Straus & 
Giroux. 

Reviewed by 
Anna KisseJgoff 

I N 1948, Lincoln Kirstein 
and George Balanchine 
founded the New York City 
Ballet, an outgrowth of earlier 
companies that were among 
their joint ventures since 1933. 

“Mosaic," however, is not 
about Balanchine but about 
how Kirstein, now 87, sees him- 
self. Written in an ornate, self- 
aware style that rewards those 
willing to plow through it. this 
collection of seemingly inde- 
pendent essays focuses on the 
first 26 years of Kirstein's life. 
The ostensible subject is the au- 
thor's quest for sen-realization, 
but a larger theme is the emer- 
gence of American culture from 
a provincialism ended only by 
World War II. 

One of Kirstein's major 
achievements in this regard was 
to found, in 1928. the Harvard 
Society for Contemporary Art 


WHAT THEY RE READING 


• Christina Orchid, chef- 
owner of Christina’s restaurant, 
on Orcas island, north of Seat- 
tle, is reading “ Last Go Round , " 
by Ken Kesey with Ken Babbs. 

“It’s wonderful It's a true 
story about an early Pendleton 
roundup. My grandfather used 
to go and compete there when 
the competitors were real cow- 
boys. And women used to com- 
pete with lhe men. It's a heart- 
warming story.” (IHT) 



with two fellow students, Ed- 
ward M. M. Warburg and John 
Walker 3d. It might seem laugh- 
able today that three college 
boys had to familiarize Boston 
with the names of modern art- 
ists known to virtually every 
Paris concierge. 

But America was a different 
place in the years when Kir- 
stein, who was bom in 1907, 
was growing up in New Eng- 
land During his one year at 
Exeter, he and three other Jew- 
ish boys were obliged to live off 
campus. In 1926, when he en- 


tered Harvard he writes, the 
college’s president still “begged 
his board to deal with ‘a danger- 
ous increase in the proportion 
of Jews.’ ” 

Kirstein's eventual calling' 
was to further an appreciation 
of artistic enterprise. Ballet, 
photography, painting, sculp- 
ture, Japanese court music and 
Japanese prints, early music, 
lyric theater and Shakespeare 
festivals were championed 
through his polemical writings, 
scholarship, patronage, initia- 
tive and, above all vision. 


Like some artists. Kirstein. 
an aspiring painter and illustra- 
tor, apprenticed himself to a 
craftsman, by working in a 
stained-glass factory. “Mosaic” 
acknowledges his limitations as 
an artist without regret, but ap- 
prenticeship — in life — re- 
mains its leitmotif. 

It is no accident that the 
longest chapter is devoted to 
Kirstein’s meeting in 1927 with 
G. I. Gurdjieff. Kirstein is not 
the only intellectual attracted to 
the founder of the celebrated 
human-potential movement 
and author of “Meetings With 
Remarkable Men.” 

He reiterates here his out- 
wardly puzzling debt to Gurd- 
jieff: “He exerted more influ- 
ence on my behavior than 
anyone, including my parents.” 

That is saying a great deal. 
Rose and Louis Kirstein (the 
chief executive of Filene’s and 
president of the Boston Public 
Library) are eloquently depict- 
ed as wise and loving parents. 
Their son never broke with 
them, unlik e the En glish dandy- 
aesthetes of the 1930s. 

What saved Kirstein from 
their tinge of dilettantism was 


perhaps, indeed, his apprentice- 
ship to an eclectic body of be- 
liefs that could be assimilated 
into a whole. “Mosaic,” with its 
wildly ranging episodes, comes 
together in this sense. 

A more literal example is 
Kirstein's revelation that he 
sometimes recites a Muslim 
prayer during .Mass. This 
oblique reference to his recent 
conversion to Catholicism is a 
typical throwaway line. 

His impression of Balanchine 
in London in 1 933 hints in this 
way at their future relationship. 
They would be collaborators, 
not friends. Balanchine, he 
says, was always “absent as a 
tangible personality when not 
in actual labor onstage or in 
rehearsal." 

Kirstein candidly explodes 
the myth that he was the first to 
invite the choreographer to 
America. “Balanchine showed 
me a telegram offering him a 


job teaching in New York, with 
a further year’s option." 

“Mosaic” stops short of the 
fact that Kirstein won Balan- 
chine over with the offer of a 
grander future. He was sup- 
ported in this by other men who 
would play a role in America's 
cultural development. 

Some, like himself, would 
many and, as this book makes 
dear, love men as well as wom- 
en. In earlier years, Kirstein felt 
obliged to suppress a novel he 
wrote on related themes. But 
here he recalls easily a London 
dinner with E.M. Forster “and 
his Bob Buckingham a consta- 
ble” and others of “my true, not 
my accidental preference, my 
real blood-tribe.” 

“Mosaic,” above all, is an act 
of self-liberation. 

Anna KLssefgoff is on the staff 
of The New York Times. 


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Maeooa 
Mateycla-e 
Mnlca + 

Monaco + 

Nash. Anita 

{Curacao 5 Santera} + 

Natheriand( + 

Me* Z e a la n d A 
pn c o u ntr y caih) 

Net. Zealand 

Nicaragua Wenepue EmSte) a 
Nicaragua iHiimriw SfonhJi) O 
Nicara g u a I ri mM i W a ttpin i 

Norway + 

Panama 
Paraguay A 


ACCESS NUMBBtS 

0066-55-877 
0039-131 
0066 -554 B6 
0800-12 
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155-9777 
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08004115 
0600-121 
8004016 
95-800-B77-8000 
19+0087 

00 1 -800-745- 1 1 1 1 
06+032-9119 
DH-O-eU B d. [*H K nc. 

000 999 

171 

161 

aZ + EagUiarSpanidina. 

800-19877 

115 

008-12-800 


ACCESS NUMBERS COUNTPIK 


Peru / 

Philippine* (£171 stations ortiyj 
Philippines (PfallCom) A 
Philippine! (PUTT) 

Poland + 

Portage! +• 

Puerto Rico — 

Romania +■ 

RiKtla (Mouow) ♦ 

Route (ell a Aar] -■ 

Saipan 

liman and Rate +■ 

5an Marino + 

Saudi Austria 
jingopara + 

Sooth Africa + 

Sputa 
St LueJeO 

SL Lucia 3 

Sweden + 

Swrftonrfand + 

Syria + 

Taiwan • 

Ihriaid/ 

Trinidad & Tobago 
(ports of army only] 


196 

v 1 05-01 
103+11 
105-16 

00104-800-115 

05017-1-877 

1-800-877-0000 

01-800-0*77 

135-6133 

8095-1 SS-61 33 

inwn 

1-2354333 

172-1877 

1800-IS 

8000- 177-1*7 

0- 800494001 
900494013 

I '800-277-7448 
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Tar key 6 

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0800494877 

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173.1877 

SCO- 1 111-0 

8C0-M1I-V 



Sprint. 


"V* a r ^ Hi*"* & rlrourc. ,,, 


















International Herald Tribune , Thursday, September 29, 1994 


Page 9 



THE TRIB INDEX. 115.49S§ 

Intemabonal Herald Tribune World Stock Index ©, composed of 
Z80 IntematonaHy inveslable slocks from 25 countries, compiled 

by Bloomberg Business News. Jan. 1, 1092 b 100 . 

120 — - 

... 



Jar dine Croup Finds Itself Outside a Chinese Wall 


By Kevin Murphy 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — As Chinese-style guanxi, or 
personal connections, rapidly replaces British 
old-boy networks in Hong Kong business circles, 
most local and foreign companies are successful- 
ly adjusting to the changing political climate. 

But for Jar dine Matheson Holdings Ltd-, the 
oldest and most British of Hong Kong's trading 
houses, the transition is proving exceptionally 
difficult 

Beijing, which takes control of Hong Kong in 
1997, has balked at two Jar dine units’ involve- 
ment in a SI. 6 billion Hong Kong port develop- 
ment bec a use of their parent company’s per- 
ceived support for Hong Kong democratic 
reforms, which China bitterly opposes. 

_ The situation has readied the point where for- 
eign ministers Douglas Hurd of Britain and Qian 


Qichen of China must discuss it in a planned 
meeting at the United Nations on Thursday. 

In the past, China has objected to the financ- 
ing plans for Hong Kong’s $20 billion airport 
now being built and has hinted strongly that it 
suspected British companies would get most of 
the contracts, but the container-handling port, 
known as CT-9, is its highest profile instance of 
direct interference. 

“Most informed investors overseas have come 
to accept the nature of Jardines' relationship 
wiLh China, " Tim Storey, an analyst with H.G. 
Asia Securities, said. He was referring to nearly 
three years of Beijing’s specific attacks on the 
diversified group for its opium-trading past and 
decision to delist its companies from the Hong 
Kong Stock Exchange. 

“But at the end of the day. this situation has a 
significant impact. It must be slightly off-putting 


that companies are being treated openly on the 
basis of who they are, rather than what they can 
offer.” Mr. Storey said. 

Bob Broadfoot of the Political & Economic 
Risk Consultancy said, “The impasse over CT-9 
is a twofold problem. The political problems will 
be resolved and the project will go ahead, but we 
have to get used to the fact that major contracts 
involving China will get bogged down in nit- 
picking on financial details.” 

“There is a fundamental Chinese distrust that 
foreigners are trying to rip them off — and some 
do — so negotiations in Hong Kong are headed 
the way they are in China — lengthy and pains- 
taking.” Mr. Broadfoot said. 

Butin general, most businessmen appear little 
concerned by the possibility of Chinese political 
interference in major contract and franchise 
decisions. 


For companies that have courted Hong 
Kong’s new landlord, it is business as usual in a 
town where politics and cronyism once worked 
to British firms’ advantage. 

“When you're trying to work for both sides, it 
can be difficult, but I think most people have 
made adjustments,” the head of one foreign 
construction company's Asian operations. 

Hong Kong port officials project that any 
further delays to CT-9 will result in the satura- 
tion of the colony’s eight container facility, but 
the Hong Kong government says it will not push 
Jardine Matheson or its 32 percent controlled 
Hongkong Land Co. out of the deal 
“We’re still trying to get CT-9 off the ground,” 
said a Hong Kong government spokesman, de- 
nying reports the load government would shelve 

See PORT, Page 13 


m 

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ikbtf. u 

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♦ • 


Di 




ftsla/Pacific 


Approx, weighting; 32% 
04P.NL 12124 Piw: 12022 


A M J J A S 
1994 


North America 


Approx, weighting: 26% 
04P.M.: 96J0 Piw.: 95J55 


Apprat wafgffling: 37% 
04P.M.: 115.49 Piot^ 11522 


A M J J A S 
1994 


t-arin America 


Approx, weighing: 5% 
©4PJfL 149.89 Prac 14933 


Senator Vows to Block GATT 



yn 


The index Hacks U.S. dollar values of stocks kv Tokyo, Now York, London, and 
Argentina. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chita, Denmark, Finland, 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kona Italy, Mexico. Netherlands. New Zealand, Norway, 
Singapore, Spain. Sweden, Switzerland and Venezuela. For Tokyo, Naur York and 
London, the index to composed of me 30 lap issues m forms of market capitalization, I 
otherwise the tan top stocks era tracked. 1 


industrial Sectors 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The chairman of 
a key Senate committee vowed Wednes- 
day to block a vote on a world trade 
accord this year, saying it undermined 
U.S. sovereignty. 

“No chance at all.’’ Senator Ernest F. 
Hollings thundered when asked whether 
he would permit a vote on the pact,, 
negotiated under the General Agreement 
on Tariffs and Trade. 

The South Carolina Democrat said he 
wanted more protection for the textile 
industry, which is important in his state, 
but also that he had far wider objections 
to GATT, including the establishment of 
the World Trade Organization, which he 
said would infringe on U.S. sovereignty. 

“Yes, well lose a million textile jobs,” 
he said, but added, “I’m not shilling for a 


single industry. I’m shillin g for the Unit- 
ed Slates of America.” 

Mr. Hollings spoke less than an hour 
after two House of Representatives com- 
mittees cleared GATT legislation. 

Under the special fast-track rules for 
consideration of trade bills, Mr. Hollings, 


Hopes for a U.S. -Japan trade accord aided 
the doDar. Page 10. 

as chair man of the Commerce Commit- 
tee, has 45 days to consider the bill. 

Despite a meeting with President Bill 
Clinton on Tuesday, Mr. Hollings said 
he would use those 45 days to conduct a 
series of bearings on the pact, effectively 
preventing a decision before Congress 


adjourns for the year in the next few 
weeks. 

Max Baucus. the Montana Democrat 
who heads the Senate Finance subcom- 
mittee on Trade, said senators were dis- 
cussing a maneuver to force the bill from 
Mr. Hollings’s panel. 

But Mr. Hollings said the tactic Lhey are 
discussing would be illegal under the fast- 
track procedure in place for the legisla- 
tion. Asked if he was playing into the 
hands of Republicans, so soon after Con- 
gress failed to pass health care reform, Mr. 
Hollings said, T want to support Presi- 
dent CUn ton in every way I can, and in my 
way of thinking . I’m doing that.” 

GATT would cut worldwide tariffs by 
about $740 billion, reduce other barriers 
to trade and extend world trade rules to 
services and intellectual property' like 
computer programs and drug patents. 


Central Banks Ask 
Public Companies 
To Disclose Risk 


U.S. at Risk of Overheating, IMF Says 


Prrr. % 
dm Change 


WM. Pre*. % 

don don change 


Spri 


Energy 112.42 112.17 +022 CapBal Goods 116.73 117.03 -026 | 

USBfea 129,19 128.68 -fQ.40 Raw Materials 134.71 134.30 +031 

Rnmca 115,16 1I4.B1 ->020 Consuiaer Goods 1Q3.76 103.78 -032 

Services 12124 120.99 +021 Hiscriteiieous 13527 135.03 4025 

For more information abort the Index, a booklet Is available free rt charge. 

Write to Trib Index. 181 Avenue Charles de Gaia Ip, 92521 Neuffly Cedex, France. 

O Intwnallanal Herald Tribune 

TIONAL MANAGER 


By Alan Friedman 

Iniemwonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Increases in U.S. 
interest rates are needed and are 
“expected by financial markets” 
in order to avoid a possible over- 
heating of the economy and a 
resurgence of inflationary pres- 
sures. the International Mone- 
tary Fund said Wednesday. 


In its semiannual world eco- 
nomic outlook, the IMF fore- 
cast U.S. economic growth of 
3.7 percent this year, but it not- 
ed that rising interest rates 
should dampen investment and 
consumption, resulting in a 2J 
percent growth rate in 1995. 

“Inflation is no longer declin- 
ing, and price performance may 
begin to deteriorate if output 
growth continues to exceed po- 
tential growth,” the IMF said. 

• At the international level, by 
contrast, the IMF said there 
seemed to be “little immediate 


When Will You Get a Raise? Poor Results 

By Steven Pearlstein “I was expecting they would finally break ~r 

Washington Post Service outof the 4 percent rut this year. But the reality III f 

W ASHINGTON — If American is that employers are looking around and see- J 

workers were hoping that rising ing that their competitors aren’t raising wages, ■*-*■ a - a -a 

corporate profits and an improv- and they’re not going to raise them either.” tlUTT A-fjCOtSl 


By Steven Pearlstein 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — If American 
workers were hoping that rising 
corporate profits and an improv- 
ing labor market would lead to 
long overdue pay raises next year — well, 
there is always 1996. 

Raises in base pay will average just over 4 
percent next year, according to annual sur- 
veys by the U.S. compensation consultants. If 
consumer prices begin to move up slightly 
next year, as most economists predict, most of 
that raise will be gobbled up by inflation. 

“As far as companies can see, it’s still a 
buyer’s market for labor,” said Joseph Kil- 
martm, who heads the compensation practice 
of Wyatt Group, a Washington-based con- 
sulting firm. “What employers are saying, in 
effect, is that their people should be happy to 
have their jobs.” 

According to surveys of top executives 
around the country by Wyatt and other con- 
sultants, next year’s raises will be roughly 
what they were this year, despite continued 
improvement in the economy. 

Corporate profits were up 20 percent Last 
year, according to the Commerce Depart- 
ment’s latest calculation, and are expected to 
climb at least another 10 percent this year. 

At the same time, the U.S. unemployment 
rate has dropped from 6.S percent 10 6.1 
percent over the past 12 months. This is 
usually a sign that labor markets are tighten- 
ing and that employers need to increase pay 
in order to attract and retain employees. 

“Frankly. I was a little surprised by these 
numbers,” Darrell Cira of William M. Mercer 
Inc., another consulting firm, said of the sur- 
veys’ findings about next year’s raises. 


T was expecting they would finally break 
out of the 4 percent rut this year. But the reality 
is that employers are looking around and see- 
ing that their competitors aren't raising wages, 
arid they’re not going to raise them either.” 

Observers say several factors are holding 
down employees' base pay: 

• Pay is no longer linked to inflation. 

Ever since the double-digit inflation of the 

early 1980s, companies have moved gradually 
to break employees of the expectation that 
their paychecks will increase each year at least 
enough to cover the general inflation rate. 

“The feeling among many of the customers 
we deal with is that they’ve got to eliminate 
the entitlement mentality," said Donald Low- 
man of Towers Perrin Co„ a compensation 
firm. “For competitive reasons, companies 
are simply very reluctant to raise their fixed 
costs unless they absolutely have to.” 

Union wage contracts used to guarantee 
employees protection from inflation. But the 
share of workers in private companies covered 
by union contracts has fallen below 12 percent. 
Even for unionized employees, cost-of-living 
provisions have been so weakened that, in 
many cases, they never come into play. 

• Employees have become a more docile 
lot, as least as far as pay is concerned. 

“People are shell-shocked,” said Abe 
Zwany, vice president of Hay Group in Ar- 
lington, Virginia. “For years now they’ve 
watched as peers and colleagues and neigh- 
bors were let go by what -were perceived to be 
large, stable companies. And it’s changed 
their expectations.” 

• Bonuses are replacing permanent raises. 

Companies are eschewing permanent raises 

See RAISE, Page 13 


Compiled fy Our Staff From Dispatcher 

PARIS — Alcatel Alsthom 
said Wednesday that first-half 
net profit fell a steeper-than- 
expected 33 percent because of 
weak orders and eroding prices 
in the German market. 

The world's largest telecom- 
m uni cations -equipment com- 
pany said net profit for the half 
slipped to 2.02 billion French 
francs ($381 million) from 3.01 
billion francs in the year-earlier 
period. But revenue rose to 78.1 
billion francs from 73.6 billion. 

In addition to falling orders, 
Alcatel Alsthom attributed its 
woes to eroding prices in the 
German market, one-time losses 
in its Turkish and Brazilian tele- 
communications units and rising 
interest charges. 

Alcatel predicted its results 
for the second half would be at 
the same level as in the first half. 

Alcatel said it bad taken mea- 
sures to turn around the profit- 
ability of its German subsidiary. 

The outlook for 1995 is better 
because of optimism about the 
European economy and the 
company will be dose to bring- 
ing to the market products based 
on technologies under develop- 
ment (Bloomberg, Reuters) 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


Cross Rates 

8 I DM. 
Amsterdam i« U* LW 
Brussels JIB 5M7S SMS 
Frankfurt VS« “ 

uifaR ( 0 ) liss - 1442 

iMrfd ram msu tun 

kU las U5U0 M5U0 1JB535 






Sept. 20 

EuroiMirrency Deposits 




Sept. 28 

FJ». 

Lira OlFI 

BJ. 

Sf. 

Y«a a 

Peseta 




Swiss 


French 



ua 

aim* — 

S447- 

1J51S 

ITSto* UR 

un- 


Dollar 

D- Marti 

Franc 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

ECU 

use 

US* HUS7I 


JUCS 

03Z1B 2171 

to!** 







S'd-SNs 


am?* uni 

UM]' 

L2H 

1J*41* L1S23 

1.2834* 

1 month 

4 SArS Hi 

4 »^4 

3® MW 

S >.p s 



■UK 

ZtiMS 172*1 

SLIM 

uztf 

WiB Z11B 

2B242 

3 months 

5W-SVM 

4 , V5‘. 

3 -*r3 ^ 

5%i-S*a 


2 »v2 -« 

5 

309 

un* TUB 

lam 

raw 

12MW« KM 

— 

6 months 

5 V5 tn 

5Vh-5iA 

4^-4'A 

6 vrO % 

S«*S 

2 i^.2 'I, 


2U£ 

MM 

48 SB 

M1SJ5 

11714 1,15065 


1 War 

*wtw 

SVS'v. 

4 % 

7%-7Va 

MAP* 

ZVs-2% 


UM \sttm U37? 

3U0 

120 

7M8 U421 

12053 







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aw 

4.131 

13482* 19B3 

4.1155- 

bounces; /ta/tax Uovds ftmfc 







(U UTfaa USB tOti UIMB 1 JOT 3150 128? WS 13C1 1205! 

wewToraiw — u»* sww audi tun inn *n» 

Hit IMS Oil U4I U3 Stn 1H Titt nil IMM 

TaniM jjci 2JUl UH9 I1SSJ MM 1 U7] LOB* UM UW» I* 1 

ub jm tm va uo- um — raw ww uw 

lieu Ira ojw um *ss was vm sob ism am 1 uu uro 

US KS OWN ism T.WI uttii isa 4ksm inn huh U7. ram 

aetows fa Amsterdam, London. Now York and Zurich. f*"V* In ether centers: Toronto 

"Srroburwto pound: »: To Our one dollar: Units of ICO : NA: not auMed: NJL; not 
available. 

Other Dollar Valuss 

_ Currency Per* Cwranev Per* Currency Per* 

omkdnm. 2M40 m olpmo UB6 S-Mr.im* lS6a 

UMW Hans Komi 7J3S5 iLZealanas 1MB3 S.Kpr.w«m 7IM 

•2EK** H««Ltorin» tomb Naraucrw* urns swrf.™ ijm 

SSSf U4 mam mom 31J3 pmLkh 2i» toil 

SL"!, aiS fafaww Pomatum mn. mm * «« 

^ ttmt OMi* Porteoudo 1SM8 TVfcfaliHra 3<Wi 

Cttcn . , torOTQ KiwflitMk. 10B RuanHiu 2CUB UAE dirtora lent 

a ?2£ KuwaMBtaw 0J m Saudi rival 3JS Voter. uoHv. 19Z00 

SESS* *atav.r ta* «« 

forward Bates 

Wsfcn BMev Curtwey ***v 4Mw TKMT 

TsS 'S’** CrawfioaMttar U4W 1JO0 U42I 

152 iSS MSI *73 ** «u« 

SjtafcSwE** l M3 UW7 law 

o/ Tokvn tTokni: Royal Bank of Canada 
(Toronto); IMF tSDfU. Other data horn Hoofers and AP- 


Curmcv 
Met pew 

N. Zealand s 

HoTw. krone 
Phil, peso 
PMMztatv 
PorLeccwfo 
Rim. ntOM : 
Saudi rival 
5HK.S 


Currency Par* 
Sb Mr. rand 1SSC 
S, Kor. won 7W.ro 
SweUkrana 7 A 5 DS 
Taiwan * to2l 

ThoIboM 2*93 

TurkfatiHra 34074. 

UAE dlrtnra 2*72? 
Vend, bollv. 192.00 


S04tuv UHkn ffadav 
1J419 IJ430 U421 

W73 W4V W24 


Rotes atextcaote to Interbank astxrUts of St million minimum tor eautvatent). 


Key Money Rates 

United States Close 

ObKount rale 4.00 

Prime rate T 5 * 

Potferal fund* 4iA 

3*nMnlb CDs 4J4 

Comm, paper IS days 5 Vi 

Vroonlh Trcamry Mil 4J1 

J-year Treatary Mil SJ6 

S-venr Treasury note till 

5-year Treasary note 72T 

7-rear Treasury note 7>25 

10-year Traanrr Mle 7 S3 

30-ycarTrtattryMM 7J1 

Merrill Lvnfiti swav Ready auei C09 
JBWI 

DtMoant rale IV 

Call money 2.1* 

t-munflt folerfecmk 2 h 

3-montn tateroont 2 V. 

*-row» iraertaMf 2 v. 

W-yoor Goverament bond <40 

Qcrmraw 

LomDartfran AOO 

Cau money 4J0 

i-monte hueraank SJtt 

XnaathimertHuk 5.10 

Intertaofc US 

ift-yetr Rend 1A1 


too 

Bank base rata 

55i 

554 

754 

Call money 

5Vk 

5h 

4ft 

VroontS Interbank 

55s 

5ft 

4J5 

3-mootti Interbank 

5% 

5% 

540 

4-raofrfh Iflferiwnk 

6Vi 

ift 

448 

SJ4 

lOyear OIK 

Frantz 

9M 

8J9 

448 

722 

7J5 

740 

7JU 

llUrmtanryte 

SJ» 

5J»- 

Call money 

5ft 

5 ft' 

T-montti interbank 

5ft 

5‘. 

3^nontti Interbank 

5ft 

5Vi 

*HuoaWi latartumk 

Pk 

5ft 

40* 

IB-ymrOAT 

8JJ7 

8.15 


Sources: Reuters. Blcomberp. Mtrr.lt 
Lyneh. Bonk of Tokyo. Commorrhonk. 
GnmmntU Manfapu. Credit L vonnais. 



AM. 

PJA. 

Oi'ge 

Zarim 

397.40 

39425 

+ li» 

London 

397 JO 

39425 

+ 045 

Now York 

40050 

39750 

-ISO 


US. dollars par ounce. London official fix- 
ings: Zurich and New York opening and dos- 
ing prices: now York Comex (December.! 
Source,- Reuters. 


risk of a generalized pickup in 
inflation, notwithstanding a 
significant rise in. the prices of 
some primary commodities.” 

The report said that German 
interest rates were at “broadly 
appropriate levels” following the 
latest round of cuts by the 
Bundesbank The report con- 
tained a significant upward revi- 
sion of growth forecasts for Ger- 
many,- projecting a gross 
domestic product growth rate of 
2.3 percent for 1994, compared 
with the 0.9 percent it forecast in 
May. It forecast 2.8 percent 


growth in 1995, up from its last 
forecast of 7JS percent. 

The IMF also revised upward 
its forecast of overall growth in 
the European Union, predicting 
2.1 percent 1994 growth among 
the 12 member nations and a 
rate of 2.9 percent next year. 

But the report warned gov- 
ernments of industrialized na- 
tions must address a roster of 
structural issues. Chief among 
these are “the unacceptably 
high levels of unemployment,” 
particularly in Europe. 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Central bankers 
look the extraordinary step 
Wednesday of asking publicly 
traded companies to disclose 
their exposure to financial risks, 
including those associated with 
derivatives, the fast-growing 
and often volatile instruments 
that do not show up on corpo- 
rate balance sheets. 

The request is an unusual at- 
tempt by the central banks to 
overcome a deadlock among 
bank and securities regulators 
as well as the gridlock of incom- 
patible national accounting 
practices that have prevented 
collective action until now. 

Although the main target is 
financial intermediaries, the re- 
port says its recommendations, 
which cover derivative-related 
and other kinds of financial 
risks “could be of value for non- 
fin ancial firms as welL” 

At a time when a range of 
industrial companies — from 
Metallgesdlschaft AG in Ger- 
many to Procter & Gamble Co. 
in the United States — and sup- 
posedly staid money-market 
funds are reporting huge losses 
from exposures in the exotic 
market of financial derivatives, 
the central bankers warned that 


a potentially dangerous infor- 
mation gap between the finan- 
cial risk that public companies 
are willing to assume and public 
awareness of those risks urgent- 
ly needs to be closed. 

Bank and securities regulators 
are concerned about derivatives 
because of the $4 trillion size of 
the market, its phenomenal 
growth from nothing in less than 
a decade, the complexity of its 
instruments — based on com- 
mitments to buy, sell or swap 
financial assets and the in- 
ability to capture this activity on 
balance sheets or income state- 
ment statements of participants. 

With neither regulators nor 
accounting authorities able : *. 
agree on how to measure and 
report risk exposure, a panel of 
central bankers from 12 leading 
industrialized countries meeting 
under the aegis of the Bank for 
International Settlements issued 
a report Wednesday proposing 
(hat companies voluntarily up- 
grade their disclosure standards 
to increase information about 
what they are doing and how 
well they are doing it. 

The aim is to quickly create a 
voluntaiy code of conduct pro- 
viding information about risks 

See RISK, Page 13 


Trust, discretion, understanding, dialogue. 

In fact, what you need is a bank that isn't like yours. 






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■ 


Page IQ 

market diary 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


Wall Street Rises 
On Cyclical Issues 


Via AswoK^ Pmi 


Dow Jones Averages 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Daily dosings of the ' 

Dow Jones industrial average 


Open High Low Lost Cbfl. 


Metals 


Last Santa O fwt 


mdus 3847.75 389X94 38636* 3878.18 + 15.14 , 
T«« IW54 150365 14*061 150264 +4*0 
um 177 JO 179JB 177.56 17873 * 1X8 

Como 128777 1295.11 128852 1292.75 + SJJ5 | 


Close Preview 

Bid Aik M AA 

ALUMINUM (HmOimtt) 

Donors per metric ten _ 

Soot 140*00 140760 158300 158400 

Forward Is3f_xr TAXU» H07109 140860 

COPPER CATHODES (High Crude) 

Dalton per metric tan 
Soot 255BJD 255950 254400 25 «jOO 

Forward 256300 254940 29400 255760 

LEAD 

Dofkm per metric ton 
Spot 63240 43300 41300 61? JO 

Forward 64400 647-00 43250 43300 

NICKEL 

Dolton per metric ton 

Soot 6445JS 645400 6380 JW 6385 DO 

Forward 454300 455300 448300 6*5.00 

TIN 

Dollars per metric too 
Soot 534300 535300 S345JJ0 5355JJ0 

Forward 542300 543040 543300 543300 

ZINC (Special Htoh Grade) 

Deltari per metric ten 

Spot 101800 101300 1002-50 100150 

Forward 104200 104300 102450 103750 


G" 9 ikd by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 
NEW YORK — U.S. stocks 
rose on Wednesday, led by cv- 
fbral stocks, amid optimism the 
U -S- central bank’s decision not 
to rase interest rales meant the 
economy and corporate profits 
would keep growing. 

“Investors now seem to be 
dnvea more by the perception 
that earnings will increase dra- 
matically than interest rates will 


U.S. Stocks 


put a lid on stock price perfor- 
mance," an analyst said. 

Bonds also got a boost by the 

Fed’s inactivity on Tuesday. 
The benchmark 30-year Trea- 
sury bond rose 12/32 to yield 
7.81 percent, down from 7.84 
percent on Tuesday. 

The Dow Jones industrial av- 
erage rose 15.14 points, to 
3,878.18, according to an earlv 
tally. 

Advancing issues led de- 
diners by 2 to I on the New 
York Stock Exchange, where 
volume totaled 267.4 million 
shares. 

Economically sensitive is- 
sues, which tend to gain on sta- 
ble interest-rate scenarios, were 


higher as fears of a rale increase 
receded. 

Caterpillar rose, despite re- 
ports Tuesday that the National 
Labor Relations Board had is- 
sued new unfair labor practice 
repons against the farm-ma- 
chinery maker. 

International Paper, DuPont 
and AlliedSignal also climbed. 

Support also stemmed from 
stronger-th .in -expected durable 
goods orders. The Commerce 
Department said orders to U.S. 
factories for big-ticket durable 
goods soared 6 percent in Au- 
gust — the biggest rise in nearly 
two years. 

Shares of regional Bell tele- 
phone companies gained For a 
second day after Nynex submit- 
ted a plan to New York state 
regulators that would eliminate 
a limit of 12 percent return on 


I 3700 



Standard & Poor’s indexes 


Industrials 

Tronso. 

Utilities 

Finance 

SP 500 

SP10Q 


Htofr Law Close OTg* 
55057 54492 530.16 +324 
343M 34341 36324 +389 
15394 1 52-31 1S364 + 1J3 
4361 432B <351 +022 
4449 442-55 *454 +Z79 
43314 42952 43153 + 151 


NYSE Indexes 


Camomile 

Industrials 

Tronso. 

Utility 

Finance 


Man Law Last Che. 
25444 25457 25658 +151 


Mb 1SL2S 15750 
MOT 15325 15740 
Aar 15740 15475 
MOV 15550 15550 
June 154J5 15*75 
Jnfy , N.T. N.T. 
Est. volume; 11,284. 


15300 15300 —025 
15825 15395 Until. 
15475 15475 —325 
15550 15550 — 325 
15*75 15473 Until. 
N.T. 157JJ0 +350 
Open Int. 103774 


44400 44750 *3250 43300 


BRENT CRUDE OIL (IPB) 

1X5. denars per barm-lots of 168# barrels . 
NOV 1455 1420 1453 1453 +314 

DK 1445 14JB 1443 1443 +3U 

Jan 1472 1448 I47D 1471 + XM 

Feb 1472 1450 1472 1469 +002 

MOT 1464 1448 1444 14*8 +002 

Apr 1468 1451 1448 1468 Until. 

Mar NX N.T. N.T. 1448 —M2 

Jon 1447 1447 1447 1448 — 30} 

Jhf 1470 1467 lOtt 1470 — 004 

Aog 1472 1469 1669 1473 —DM 

S«p 1473 1440 1472 1474 -M2 

Oct 1473 1470 1472 1678 —M2 


uun lULis ******** — •• — 

GE Chief Says Turner Had No Deal 

..... t. n/.i»l< rJiAimunof G 


“Ted Turner S . dal to bny NBC, 

said on a business television show Tuesday night. I 
Ted Turner said that” Mr. Welch was responding to a speech Mr. 
Turner made in which he said he had conclud ed ^ ^ 

acquire NBC for $5 billion. He confirmed that GE had held 
discussions with Turner “but there was never, ««r* ■ 

In other comments, the Mr. Welsh said a sale of tocMtwottws 
only one among a number of options. A sale *° d *? ri y 5?*!? 
option," he noted- “Do I put it as a highly probable option? No. 

Trade Negotiations Deadline Looms 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The United States and Japan 
failed on Wednesday to strike an agreement on trade. Negotia- 
tions, which have stretched fruitlessly over the past 14 months, are 
set to resume on Friday. . . n 

“We have had thorough and substantive meetings in au arras, 
Midkey Kantor, the U.S. trade representative, said after three 
hours of talks with Trade Minister Ryu taro Hashimoto of Japan. 
“The Japanese understand that they have until midnight Friday, 
September 30th,” Mr. Kantor said, referring to a deadline after 
which the United States may choose to impose sanctions on 

treasury Secretary Lloyd Beatsen tried to reassure currency 
Timffrrts He said a strong dollar was important to the U.S. economy 
and that exchange rates would not be used as a trade weapon. 


32MB 31969 331 JO + 161 
23375 232.17 23331 +1.1* 


Esf. volume: 37608. Own bit 140529 


23375 232.17 23131 
20677 20434 20409 
207 JO 205.94 207313 


Financial 


A W J J A 


NASDAQ Indexes 


High Low Lost do. 


NYSE Most Actives 


Comnoslle 

industrials 

SanLi 

Insurance 

Finance 

Transp. 


74342 75773 7597* >187 
770.65 76495 769.52 +445 
773.32 770,57 77134 * 1.76 
94X22 93134 73731 +873 
93469 93420 93426 +242 
70497 698.12 70*80 — ljt5 


equity from the company's lo- 
cal phone operations. The pro- 
vision is seen boosting profits. 

Chemical stocks were led 
higher by Dow Chemical on 
news the company is learning 
up with the Russian gas giant 
RAO Gazprom to buy three 
chemical plants once run by the 
East German communist gov- 
ernment. 

(Bloomberg. AP . Reuters) 


SCECP 

TcIMei 

BiotfcE 

V*NC* 

Compaq i 

.VierTcs 

c-» 

Mcatol 

Frw.Vc 

FardMs 

Aftascjlch 

wm/.iort 

NMeOEnt 

PjUNaO 

PtiWlC 


B777D 13', 
54662 64“, 

54345 28'+ 

5C218 34ft 
4371 J 34 
41943 36 
38540 33'. 

32099 21 

31609 19 V. 

28*81 28*i 

27622 lift 
27375 24 
25852 17'. 
21971 6'* 
20271 33 ft 


I2’« 

15>e 

42 >L 

43 

2T«! 

J8 >m 

35', 

35Vk 

33 Y. 

32 V, 

33*+ 

34V. 

31 ’V 

XIV. 

10k. 

19Vi 

19*k 

(9H 

ZF a 

27ft 

11 

lift 

nn 

23ft 

i<*% 

16+1 

4V. 

4+j 

32’k 

33ft 

[Active 


AMEX Stock Index 


hm Law Last aw. 
456.24 48338 4SO.I9 +377 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
■ io utilities 
10 industrials 


Clearing Trade Clouds 
Shed Light on Dollar 



VoL 

Mali 

Low 

Loti 

ara. 

Intel 

4797* 

43’ 4 

41ft 

Slft 

—i 

■jIMtelT.'sn 

*7557 

I'-j 

ft 

’Vd 

—2ft, 

infamirx 

39*18 

24 ft 

25ft 

24 

+ ft 

Am« 

37741 

JO'Y 

25 

24'/- 

— Sft 

USHlIhs 

31134 

44 M 

43Vi 

*4 

*2ft 

Lotus 

29170 

34 

3*'-, 

34ft 

—ft 

PondSi, 

770 ST 

641- 

53ft 

Sfcft 

—FU 

OracVj s 

24338 

43 ft 

42ft 

43 



C*cos 

26000 

74ft 

73ft 

74 ft 

— ft 

Novell 

225*8 

15 

14ft 

15 

-'.4 

T«ICmA 

20973 

22ft 

22 

32ft 

+ ft 

Midi s 

70806 

571 j 

54'1 

57 

-ft 

.'.SCI 

70773 

2* ft 

23ft 

2*vu 

+ Vi, 

HlwdPl 

2033* 

If*! 

13ft 

14 

— 4ft 

ApIdMI s 

18733 

44W 

**<) 

AS 

— ft 


NYSE Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Hfahs 

New Laws 


■400 1010 

809 11*9 

699 716 

2S6B 2895 
52 34 

79 123 


AMEX Diary 


AMEX Most Actives 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanoed 
Total issues 
Newhfighs 
New Lows 


298 264 

252 298 

271 245 

821 BB7 

16 13 

18 30 


Htob Law Oat* Change 
3-MONTH STERLING tUFFE) 
SSMMH-PbeflWpti 

Dec 712* 93.19 93J7 -MUg 

Mar 923,5, 923B 9134 + 0117 

JOB 9168 9160 7167 + 0JB 

Sep 91.25 91.17 9IJS +007 

Dec 90.93 VMS 90.92 + 107 

S&ar ®J1 9065 9069 + MS 

Jua 90S7 9051 9055 +00* 

Saw 9047 9X43 ?SUS + *04 

DCC 90-38 98ti4 tO-36 +064 

AMR- 9034 90.2? 9053 +0.06 

•Jun 9030 9S5-25 9026 + 006 

S«P 9030 9022 902 +010 

Ext. volume: 64319. Open Int.: 487.415. 
3A1DNTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFE3 
tl rallUoa ■ utaof 10« pd 
Dec 94.13 94.12 94.13 +003 

MOT M.T. N.T. 9075 +001 

Jon N.T. N.T. 93J? +061 

SCP N.T. N.T. 9107 — CLQ1 

Est. volume: 340 Open InL: 3395. 
MAONTH EUROMARKS fLIFPE) 

DMl million- pti of IM Pti 
Dec 9*75 94.71 94J4 +004 

Mar 9*35 9*31 M3* +004 

Jen 9X96 9X91 9X9* +UM 

SOP 9361 9X55 9159 +MS 

Dec 9134 9125 9331 +066 

Mar 9X12 9103 9X10 + 0.07 

Jan 9X91 9X83 9X89 + IUM 

Sep 9X73 9269 92.77 +006 

Dec 9X57 9X53 9X56 +H06 

Mar N-T. N.T. 9X44 + 006 

Jaa 9X30 9X23 9230 + 007 

Sap 9X19 9X09 9X1* + 009 

Est. volume; 68696. Open Int.: 691.121. 
3-MONTH PI BOR (MAT IF} 
FFSmllBoa-ptsaf lOOpd 
Dee M.11 9*07 Mil +0 l06 

Mar 53*5 9X59 KLSS +008 

Jun 9X25 9X19 9X25 +009 

Sep 9X92 9X07 9X92 +008 

Dec 9X64 9260 9X63 +006 

MOT 9263 9X39 9262 + 0.03' 

JUfl 9X25 9X20 92X3 +007 

Sep 9X11 9X87 9X10 +007 

Est. volume; 41675. Open Int.: 167,371. 


PTSE 188 (L1FFE1 
(25 per fittttx point 

’■Dec 30650 3017J 3056 0 +380 

Mar 3080J 307BO 30800 +390 

EM. volume: 14668. Open hit: 5X161. 

CAC 40 (MATTF) 

&w°° ^ l raaa° il iW^ 190300 +700 

Oct 193X00 1898J0 1911J0 +700 

Nov 1939.00 192000 1920M +6* 

Dec 195100 W2SUB 193000 

Mar 195000 195000 195450 +700 

Jua 196500 194050 194700 +700 

Est. volume: 58090. Open int.: 6761 X 
Sources; Motif. Associates Press, 
London Inrt Financial Futures ExatatWb 
I inn PetnMvm Exchange. 


Stock Indexes 

High LOW cwu Change 


DhrUmds 


LONG GILT (LIFFE1 
KRUNO - pts A 32nd» Of lt» PCI 
Sep 100-16 99-24 100-14 +0-20 

Dec 9M1 98-25 99-25 + 0-24 

Mur N.T. N.T. 99-05 + 0-24 

Est. volume: 101044. Open Inf.: 109652. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE1 
DM 258000 - pts Of IH PCt 
DOC 8969 8808 8957 + 157 

Mar 8000 8800 8888 + 006 

Est. volume: 17X897. Op an Int l: 146388. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MATIF3 

FPWiOB-PtiOf lBOpti 

DOC 11130 11086 111X2 +006 

MOT 11062 110.14 11068 +006 

Jun H1964 1096* 109X6 + 004 

Sep N.T. N.T. N.T. UnetL 

Est. volume: 161879. open Int.: 13X309. 


Corrqnled by Our Staff From Dispcicha 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose Wednesday, driven by ex- 
pectations that some form of 
trade accord would be reached 
Friday between tbe United 
States' and Japan and by gains 
in U.S. Treasury securities. 

Amy Smith, an analyst for 
IDEA, said traders expected 
U.S. and Japanese trade negoli- 


broad trade sanctions against 
Japan. He also said the admin- 
istration would not use the dol- 
lar as a trade weapon. 

The dollar rose to 9S.*X)0 >en 
in late afternoon trading, from 
98.305 on Tuesday. 


I VkJCB 
Atari 
EtiwBav 
ViacwfC 
CIsFti 
Nr Tim 
Vi 0131117 
ViOCrtwi 
Para ic a 

AflvMeaT 


VOL 

Hfgfi 

LOW 

LOS* 

OKI. 

28066 

39*., 

37ft 

38ft 

Hft 

18399 

7ft 

6ft 

7ft 

+ Ift 

12155 

13Hi 

13ft 

13ft 

— ft 

«33 

27k 

f’Vu 

-H 

8379 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft 

_ 

7B05 

22V, 

21ft 

22 

—ft 

4*48 

4 

3ft 

m* 

—Vi 

5790 

l'Vi. 

l'A 

1ft 

—V. 

5*08 

4ft 

Jft 

4Vi, 

_ft 

SIV 

1 

ft 

1ft 

♦Vi, 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Untiwnaed 
Total issues 
Newhioris 
New Lows 


1746 1466 

14QI 1610 
1942 2009 

5009 5085 

83 75 

57 75 


Spot COffHVMHflftlaS 


Company Per Amt 

IRREGULAR 

AARP Bat Stk - .125 

AARP Grv* Income . 2S 

Banco de Galicia c JIM 

Minorca ADR e 

Scuddar Dev . 100 

Scudrter Global _ 65 

Scudder GoM Fd - 053 

Crapprax amount par ADR. 

STOCK 

United NH Bncn . 6 « 

INCREASED 

EaateBcitn Q J3 

Grave Bank . Q -IS 

Mormon Reals o J»re 

-Mutual Risk Q 08 

Parkwav Co Q -16 

United Ntf Bncn Q 2J 

REDUCED 

Moss HealHiLEduc M M3 

OMITTED 

Curtice Bums 

* INITIAL 

FstFMSvaBJc 


Foreign Exchange 


Gains in the U.S. stock and 

Market Sales 


Com mod tty 

m Alrnninunif lb 

Today 

*729 

Prey. 

0618 

bond markets aisu helped the 
dollar rise, traders and analysts 
said. U.S. bonds held early 
gains after shrugging off a 

NYSE 

Amen 

Nasdaq 
in militant. 

Today 

Close 

329.65 

22.13 

27065 

Prev. 

com 

351^2 

IU1 

27172 

Cooper electrolytic. It) 

iron fob. ton 

Lead, lb 

Silver, travaz 

Steel (scrap). Ian 

Tin. lb 

Zinc, lb 

162 

71100 

(M0 

S625 

11*17 

36478 

*5145 

162 

21X00 

040 

54*5 

11*17 

36449 

*5145 


Industrials 


Hlyti Low Lost Settle Dm 
GASOIL CIPE) 

UJ. doHors per metric too-Ms of 188 Ions 
Oti 15Q? 5 14X25 15X00 150X0 +A75 

Nov 15X75 151.00 15X50 15X50 +050 

DCC 15525 15X75 155X0 155X0 +12S 

JOB 157X0 15575 15675 15675 —0X5 


Amfod Find 
AquarlonCO 
Atlantic Commun 
Bay Area Bncahrs 
cmioi Chile 
Gtotfetler tPHl 
llllnots PwroflHlPfA 
Illinois PwradlotB 
'Montana Pavmr 
NawmanSvgsBk 
Oshkosh Truck B 
Roanoke Gas 
State Bncshn 
Stewart Enters 
Volmonf indust 
Vuteon Mota-lols 


_ X333 10-6 
REGULAR 

Q X6 10-10 
Q MS 10-11 
O X HO 
O M 10-7 
e .mm 1&4 
Q .175 10-14 
ifA 75 10-10 

itB _ 875 10-10 

Q 60 10-10 
. X5 9-30 
O .125 11-7 
Q 75 10-14 
Q .10 10-21 

a xi 10-7 

Q .035 938 
Q J3 11-23 


GM Plant’s Strike Idles Two Others 


c-approx amount per ADR. 
o-oonoal: (MXrynbie In Canadtaa famts; 
monthly; q-quorieriv; s^miIpmhI 


DETROIT (AP) — A shortage of parts from a General Motors 
Corp. complex that dosed when 11,500 workers went on strike has 
nanspd two GM assembly plants to stop production, the company 
said Wednesday. 

Tbe strike by United Auto Workers at the Buick City complex 
in Flint, Michigan, started Tuesday monrin^. By the evening, GM 
mtirf its two midsize car assembly plants m Lansing, 50 miles 


^southwest of Flint, were sending workers home early. The 6,550 
workers at Lansing were told not to come to work Wednesday, a 


ators to reach a partial pact on 
Friday, agreeing on insurance 
and government procurement 
but failing to seal an accord on 
the auto sector. 

“It’s not so much the details 
of the agreement that will help 
the dollar, but the mere fact 
that the cloud that has hung 
over the dollar will be lifted 
next .week," Ms. Smith said. 
Negotiators failed to make any 
breakthroughs Wednesday but 
said they would resume "their 
efforts on Friday. 

U.S. Treasury Secretary 
Lloyd Bentsen said he did not 
expect the United States to level 


that said orders for durable 
goods rose b percent in August. 

The dollar rase to 1.5520 
Deutsche marks from 1.5436. to 
5.2945 French francs from 
5.2675 and to 1 .21576 Swiss 
francs from I.27S0. The pound 
fell to S 1.5745 from S 1.5798. 


Morgan to Lift Bank Stake Profit Rising for Italy’s Stet 


Reports showing such robust 
economic growth have hurl the 
dollar in recent months by spur- 
ring concern about inflation 
and pushing the bond market 
lower. Currency traders watch 
bonds to gauge foreign inves- 
tors' appetite for U.S. assets. 

(Bloomberg. AFX) 


Agence France-Pmse 

BARCELONA — J. P. Mor- 
gan & Co. is to invest 5 billion 
pesetas ($39 million) in shares 
in Banco Espanol de Credito 
SA, the Spanish bank's presi- 
dent. Alfredo Saeoz, said. - 
Morgan would acquire the 
shares at the end of October, 
when Banesto is to make a pub- 
lic stock sale, Mr. Saenz said 
late Tuesday. 


The U.S. bank controls 2.16 
percent of Banesto. 


Mr. Saenz also told a meeting 
of Banesto executives that the 
bank would report a loss for the 
year 


“We will end the third quar- 
ter with a profit of 8 billion 
pesetas, and the accum u la t ed 
losses for 1994 are about 16 
billion pesetas," he said. 


Conyiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

ROME — The Italian state telecommunications holding 
company, Stet SpA, said f allin g debt and rising sales would 
boost its profits for 1994. 

The company said its first-half pretax profit rose 51 per- 
cent, to 2.7 trillion lire ($1.7 billion), from 1 .8 billion lire in the 
corresponding period last year. ■■-.■■■ 

Profit before financing charges and taxes rose 24 percent, 
to 3.6 trillion lire from 2.9 trillion Hie. 

The company said it expects sales To exceed 34 trillion for 
the year, leading to “decidedly superior" profits. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


workers at Lansing were told not to come to work Wednesday, a 
GM spokesman said. 

The striking workers at Buick City build Buicks and Oldsmo- 
bfles, engines and a variety of parts used on many GM cars. As 
other GM assembly plants run out of those parts, they will close, 
and their suppliers will feel the effects. Industry experts say most 
of GWs North American operations will be shut down if the 
strike lasts more than a few days. 


For the Record 


Groq> Axa said it proposed measures to raise its stake in the 
Tbe Equitable Cos. Inc. to around 60 percent from its current 49 
percent. . . I AFX) 

. Wal-Mart Stores Inc^ expects slower profit growth this year as 
it overhauls money-losing acquisitions such as more than 200 
Woolco stores and Sam’s Clubs warehouse stores, a company 
executive said. (Bloomberg) 

Marriott International fine, said its net profit rose 28 percent in 
the third quarter to $37 million dollars. 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 
«0ti Law 


J Season Season 

□pen Won Um Oose Olo OWW ( HWi Low 


Open Hah Law Oust Oh ObJW 


Agonca Fiance Freue Supi- 28 


Via Assooatod Plan 


CtOSp Prev. 


Amsterdam 


ABN AmruHM 
ACF Holding 
Aegon 
AtioW 
Aksa NatM 
AMEV 

Bob-Wessunen 

C3M 

D5M , 

Elsevier 
Fokkar 
Gin -Brocades 
KBG 

Ualiialinn 

HWnCwBTl 

Haeoavm 
Hunter Douglas 
IHC Caimw 
Infer Mueller 
inn Nederland 
KLM _ 

KNP BT 

KPN 

Netwova 

OceGrtoien 

PoUned 

Ptllllpi 

PotYorwn 

Raoeco 


Rhelnmeiall 
Sc iw ring 
Siemens 
Thvsswi 
Varta 


VEW 

Vlao 

Volkswagen 

WeUa 


396 398 

064*0 947 

6545065150 
395294.10 
520 310 

52950520.20 
337 337 
494 4 09 
452X0454X0 
1031 1035 


GEC 
Mill Acr 

OklXGl 

, Grjinl M Cl 


ISnneK 

GUS 


DAX Index : Mil 


maaw. 

Pravtous : 77988 


Hlllsddwn 
HSBC HICSr. 
ICt 

Ificficape 

Klngfltiicr 

LOdtrnjkc 

Land Slid 

Laganc 

Losnrc 


Rolinco 

Roranta 

Royal Dutch 

Stork 

Unilever 

vanOmmervn 

VNU 

WatierVKlvwer 


EOE Index : 405.11 
Praviws : 48066 


Brussels 


AG Fin 

Almanll 

ArOed 

Barca 

BBL _ 

Befcairl 

CBR 

CMB 

CNP 

CoCftMill 

Cobaoa 

Cainivr 

DeUtaln 

Ela tirBbtl 

Electro fl rta 

OIB 

GBL 

Gavoert 

GWverUel 


Peuxrflno 
Powerful 
Reef Kiel 
ROYOleEWM 

SacGen BeHrtaue 

Safina 

Sofvov 

THMdderlo 

Trocteoel 

UCB 

Union MMen 
Wagons Uh. 


Hong Kong ! Legal C"'!*’ Ort> 

Bk East Asia 3X50 3140 K'2S < ^^? nfc 
Camay Pacific IMX 12 65 
Cheung Kong JX'O 38.20 ME 
OHna Light Pwr 3050 JXJo hoi I Power 
Dolrv Farm Infl 10. ”0 icxo „ 

Nano Lung Dev 14.45 14 40 gJJ** 

Mono Sena Hank 55^5 S*il E l ?^ nn 

Henderson Land *7.50 4.60 E.hP 

HK Atr Ena. 35.70 ^5.40 g'/'hojon 

HK China Gas i4.9ti 1460 5 

HK Electric a 9u 26.05 

HK Land 19X5 19 J5 g-mJ' Orn 

HK Realty Trasl 1975 20 

H5BC HoWtnos 08 8750 gM“f«ld 

HK Shafts Hits 11.75 li.Ti* I 1 'l 11 

HK Telecomm 1X70 1550 

HK Fttrrv 1155 II 6C gWC Gnut 

Hutch Whampoa J7.43 J1J0 

Hvsan Dev 2X75 22 75 ! gjthmn iunlt> 

Jar am* Main. v, 6 b ; gjvo* ice I 

J twain* sir Hid 3i*o , 31 « ■ 

Ko*h»n Motor li.w txw 1 425%^; 

Mandarin Orlenr 10 u «.«5 1 

Miramar Hotel ib.to liW seal Fewer 

New World Dm 1 24 S5 XiM 

SHK Prootl 5X50 58 'rent 

Stekt* 125 3 22 WWM 

SwirePocA 61-50 tlid vtocs 

Tai Cheung Pros 10 “S 10.M Smi h Hcshcw 
TVE «M *01 vmllUKIIiW E 

Wharf Hold 3? 31 40 , 

Wheat ock Co 1 7.45 re** 5^ 

Wing on Co mil nije liej 1 -01* lL,-t. 

WJnsar Jnd. 10 « ip.-’ii ■ JgMo 

mss*®®™* iisES 


Pccrsnn 
P&Q 
Pllfclpgidfi 
PowerGcn 
Prudential 
Rank Ore 
Reenitl C:i 
Rcdland 
| Petd mil 
I Renters 
I RMC C-rcue 
I Foil* Pavie 
I PQlhinn (Unit 1 
: Rovol icci 
[RTZ 
I Salnsbun- 

I ' Sea? Ilmen 
Scat Pnvdr 
Leers 

Se-/em r rent 
I Shell 
SUMS 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhtymo 

Enw-Gurceli 

HuhtomaM 

K.O.P. 

Kvmniare 

Metro 

Nokia 

PD-Hota 

Reoota 

Stockmann 


1M 

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*5 10 

14* 

1*4 

1*10 

1C .10 

ITS 

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i*sa 

45 

ICO 

103 

I4J 

250 


T3B C.wj 

Unilever 

Uid Biscuit; 

’.'odotaou 

War Lean 3’ - 

Weilawise 

V.2illtiead 


Close Prev 

2.92 

"91 

X52 

S.*9 

* J1 

X73 

464 

*63 

135 

163 

*57 

*60 

5.56 

559 

265 

2J* 

165 

1.77 

?64 

7.1t 

*35 

865 

417 

*63 

*.+3 

*81 

155 

140 

4.2+ 

XT7 

76* 

763 

ISZ 

151 

tAt, 

*41 

5*5 

5*0 

4 17 

*0* 

*57 

4*4 

*55 

*45 

*51 

4.72 

:« 

565 

567 

564 

66;. 

4» 

IJ4 

164 

5.1* 

S.I0 


3.01 

*62 

4*5 

551 

5*3 

562 

xi: 

:sa 

7.43 

2.7S 

4 49 

9*0 

962 

1.3* 

u: 

4 

*05 

4. "» 

46C 

9.C4 

?.■* 

* 

1.9* 

4ft 

*«2 

xa: 


1 c~ 

1 lift 


5.29 

4.T* 

o63 

5*2 

iiO 

1^5 

1*5 

4J3 

*2 

451 

*65 

2.61 

360 

*60 

421 

23 j 

131 

ICO* 

4.95 

2.17 

110 

2 17 

2 to 

1155 

15 99 

2.10 

112 

194 

1.95 

*063 

3931 

Lol 

*64 

564 

X33 

3.45 

,1JJ 

1 *7 

M7 


Cdn Tire A 11** 11 Ja 

CdnUtllA 23JJ 23W 
Cascade* ,5S 

Crowns Inc 16^ 17 

CT Fln'l Svc J7+. 17% 

G« fArlrn UW 

Gl West Llfeco M 20 

Hees infiBo* 13J; 

Hudson's Bay Co Tp* 

imasca Lra 37SI» 3TA 

InvetiorsGrolnc 17 Ja UJ* 
Looart (John) 21 21 jj 
LOblaw Cos 22 21 W 

AtalSonA 20W 3F- 

Natl Bk Canada 9W 9 

Osttavro A 194J 19% 

Poncdn Petrelm 42'^ 4T* 

Power Can* 19Jv 194* 

Power Ptn'l 38K* 28W 

OuehecarB 17J 
Posers Comm H 20 Hi 2tP* 
Royal Bk Cda Zgs ffl 
Scars Canada me 7^ 7** 

Shen Cda A ** f3i* 
Soulhcm Inc 14'* 1W9 
Sielca A IP- 

Trilan Frn'l A 365 165 


Sing Bus SVC 
Stno Land 
Sing Petlm 
Sing Press tom 
Sing Shtobida 
Sins Telecomm 
Straits Steam 
,5fralls Trading 
Tat Lee Bank 
UM Industrial 163 1J9 
UtdO'sea Bk tom 1*78 UM 
UtdCseas Land 267 258 


Season Season 
high Low 


1188 1170J&696 

Est. sates 19803 ‘rue's, soles 25879 

rue’s ooen kit i*7XS0 off 5237 


Oaai High Low Oose Oto QpJrt 


9J9 960 
8.95 875 
261 266 
26 2tL?0- 
261 261 
134 334. 
470 472 
368 362. 
4J8 476 
163 179 


Stockholm 


indwtriato imtex: 19**77 
previous : 1930J8 


ACWT *10 61 2 ! 

Air Liaulae 732 737 

Alcatel AMJtofit 567 5tO 

Axa 230£D 227 JO 

Borcaire [Clel 499 .515 


AGA 
Asea A 
Astro A 
Arias Copco 

Electrolux B 

Ericsson 

Evs#llr-A 

Handelsbanken 

Investor B 

Norsk Hvdro 

Procardia AF 

SandvIkB 

5CA-A 

S-E Barken 

Skondla F 

Skanska 

5KF 

5tora 

Trolletwra BF 
Volvo BF 



Sony 

Sumitomo Bk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TaiselCorp 
Takeda Chem 
TDK 
TeHIn 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Toopan Prtnllng 
Toray lod. 
Toshiba 
Toyota . 

Yamal chi Sec 
o:x m. 

Previous : 15*3 


5790 5800 
1870 1830 
557 548- 
899 901 

3*3 338 

664 666 

TI70 1160 
4280 4290 
5SS 553 
11® 1160 
2920 2920 
1440 1410 
759 75* 

748 747 

2030 2010 
747 737 


Grains 


Toronto 


BIC 

BriP 

Bauvouer- 

Dorane 

Carttfour 

CJCF. 

Cores 

Ctwraeurs 


1313 1310 

230.70 236.90 

599 585 

728 728 

210* 2099 

210.70 217 
108 108 

1252 1254 




Sydney 


FT 30 imtJX : 735670 
Previous : 73K70 
FT-SE 103 inde* : 303870 
Previous : itKOJO 


HEX General Index : lBOSJ* 
Prev tool : 1B82J6 


Madrid 


Ciments Franc 298JQ 289 

Club Med 464 45470 

Elf-Aaultalnc 38160 38650 
Eire Disney 430 

Gen. Emr 478 4 79 JO 

HOVOS 41650 419J0 

Irrefdl 581 570 

Latorge Coaoee 41950 42370 
Legrond 7000 6790 

L*arv Eaux 47247850 

oreaiiL) 1W7 lies 

L.V7.1H. BS7 851 

■V/itra-HacncIte 106 10650 
7/iltitelin B S0 23S^fl 

Moullne. 120-80 120 

Paribas 325 327 J» 

Pechinev imi 145 145.10 
Pernod- Ricard 305 300 

Peugeot 783 772 

Picavlt Print 925 *18 

Pcdlaletimlque 519 525 

Ph- Poulenc A 122.40 ISAM 


Amcor 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora I 

Bougolnvlile 
Coles Myer 

Coma tea 

CRA 

CSR 

Fasten Biw 
Goodman Field 
ICt Australia 
Maoelton 
MlM 

Nat Aust Bank 

Haws Corp 

Nine Network 
N Broken Hill 
Pac Dunlap 
Pioneer Inn 
Nmndy Poseidon 
OCT Resources 
Santos 
TNT 

western Mini no 


Johannesburg 


I PBV 7231 7710 

I Bca Cvdlrnl H«P, •ytSL 2*71 
I B'3nci&:nicndcr S'45 £1*J3 


Paft. SI. Louis 138* 1388 1 westoac Balking +' 


874 878 
371 379 
1976 I960 
373 361 
1.02 1JJ2 

4.13 4-07 

371 570 
VU*2 78JK7 
4-50 471 

1.13 1.11 

179 177 

1090 1072 
175 175 
Z82 2.76 
1076 1026 
877 873 
4JB 4JM 
361 366 

4.10 4.15 

326 Z15 
262 263 
179 165 
ISO 373, 
273 273 
764 7.V8 


Abittbi Price 
Air Canada 
ATberto Energy 
Alcan Aluminum 
Amor Borrfck 
Avenor 

Bk NovaSoatto 
BCE 

BC Tetecomm 
Bombardier B 
Bramaiea 
Brascan A 
Corneca 
CIBC 

Ciki Natural Res 
Cdn Occld Pol 
Cdn Pacific 
Cascades Paper 
Gominco 
Consumers Gas 
Dofasca 
Daman Ind B 
Du Pont Cda A 
Echo Bov Mines 
Empire Co. A 
Fm conor idee 
Fletcher Chad A 
PneiCD Nevada 
Guardian Cop A 
Hemlo Gold 

Horsham 
Imperial Oil 
Inco 

ipl Energy 


WHEAT ICROT) LflOOuu minmun- Hahn Mr auMI 

199V. 37* Dec M IWVi 1W16 L45V, a48H-4UHKi gJB* 

476 V3 127 Marti 198 19815 193’* 197*4-0.01 'A 19704 

193 1I4HMOV95 183 285 180^ 28414—0774* ZiO 

36314 111 JUI95 134 155 15115 3-5491-002 4,939 

1*5 151 Vi Sep 95 156H 158 155V, IStW-OOlV, 104 

175 155 Dec 95 166 -0-01 Vi 8* 

15416 154 Jul96 3J2VV— OOlVy 4 

Est.M+M 1*600 Toe's. sate 11740 

Tim's ooemni 74.962 up 314 

WHEAT nQOT) MX bunw*nwn-do*oniw burnt 

4JT7V1 H2V60K 94 195 356*i 1*1*6 2.95^—0,02% 25781 

4JI7W 125 Mar 95 4.00 4-00 195 35854—063 11.984 

196 121V, May 95 1B8 188 183V, 38544-063’- »JB 

1671- 116ViJul95 3J9 1 156 IWi-ara 2.244 

177 12* Sep 95 161 —004 65 

365 360V, Dec «5 165 165 365 165 -063% 1 

Est sates NJL foe's. S«te 4.195 

Tur'i a xmlnr soaO ett M0 

CORN ICBOT) S-XOIXJ nMiun-Otoi aw um 

177 21 5Vi Dec 94 L15U 2.15W 2.14V2 2.1M-061 135703 

272V, 27SVkMar95 2J5V1 2759, 22* Vi 2J2«-ain 43626 

265 132l5Mav9S 17254 273 272 272%-OOOV, 17777 

165V, 27614 Jut 95 137V. 27714 23614 277 -06014 186*0 

170V. 279 Soots 241 V, 141V, ISOM. 2^R*-060V, 1J12 

263 275V4DeC95 2.45 245 264% 26**«-O60V, 7636 

273 271 16 Mor 96 151 to 271 to 2-509, 251 -060'-, 37 

26214 275V, Jul *6 277 257 256V, 276*6-06194 5 1 

St. sties 18600 TuCS. soles 25695 

Tub's Open Wit 2226*3 UP 2805 


COCOA 



1580 

10*1 Dec 9* 

1353 

1377 

13*0 

1341 

1605 

1077 Mar 95 

1407 

1425 

1392 

1393 

TflZ 

1078 MOV 95 

1450 

1452 

1*2/ 

1423 

1400 

1225 Jul 95 

1400 

ma 

1*57 

1451 

15*0 

1447 Sep « 




1478 

1433 

1290 Dee 95 

1519 

1523 

151? 

1505 

147ft 

1350 Mar 9fi 




153* 

1441 

1225 May 94 




1547 


17848 16580 Dec 94 17778 17790 17710 17730 -50 32,994 

17800 16640 Mir 95 17740 17770 17690 17702 —50 Z77 

17660 17348 Jim 95 17*46 —50 8 

BAetin HA. TUB'S. sties 12772 
Toe's open Sm 3327f up i**o 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (0401) SMrWr- 1 octet KWOK SOPOOI 
0700 0J038Dec96 (17*35 07463 07435 07*51 9-26 43762 


JUf« 

Est. sales 9.176 Tim's sates 5,253 
Tub's noen int 75771 up 6* 

ORANS6 JUICE tNCTN) uuDete-cavsv-n 


8560 Nw 94 9870 9960 9770 

8960 Jan 95 10175 10200 10040 
9360 Mar 95 10360 18100 10360 
9760 Mur 95 10770 10770 10760 
KKL50JUI95 __ 

11470 Sep 95 11370 11370 11370 
109.00 Nov 95 
10570 Jon 96 


Est. sales 3600 Tim's. itiM 24WB 
rue's ooen int 227ZI til 372 


+185 9.732 

+0.50 fc3i* 
+135 4698 
+0.15 1641 
♦aio 
+135 
+075 

+ 175 50 


Mefate 


W GRADE COPPER (NCM» * 

128.90 7460 Sep 94 12500 12*25 12100 

11970 7575 Dec 94 11870 11665 11*71 

11190 7690 Jan 95 11760 11815 117J5 

11770 7200 Feb 95 11770 I177Q 11760 

11770 7360 MW 95 11680 117JB 11530 

11560 7665MOV95 11LA5 111*5 11440 

11*70 7060 Jul 95 11*45 1U45 11330 

11330 79.10 SeP 95 11330 11330 11240 

122.10 7530 Oti 93 120.50 12140 11840 

11860 7775 Nov 95 11830 11830 11860 

11575 88.00 Dec 95 11170 11135 11160 

10860 8840 Jon 96 

11030 6270 MW 96 

11850 VI. 10 Apr V6 

109J0 1 0830 Mav 96 
11520 104.10 JW1« 

Jul 96 

11265 II14DAug«6 

Est. sate 10600 Tun's, sties 8400 

Tue'souenlnt 59619 off 735 

SILVER (NCMX) Maotrorat-Ctotspartrova 


SOYBEANS (CBOT) MUbuMnniwn-eaKnpvrBupirl 
757V, 5.49V, Nov 94 553 553 5*4 V, SJ8^_a 


549 V, Nov 94 553 
LB Jan 95 543 
549 Mar95 573 


7.05V, 5L75V,May 95 SJB 
7.06V, 578-5 Jul 95 565 


6.12 579 Aug 95 546 

6.15 577 Sop 95 

650 V, 578V, Nov 95 5.94 

631 4.12 Jul 96 6.11 


544V, S48to-0.05to 78694 
55**u 558V, -a Otto 21423 
U6>6 568V,— COR* 12.211 
573V, 575 -066 b.016 

5.79V5 56014-066 11678 
581 582to— 06SV. 266 

563-/5-005 79 

5.90 SJlto-0Tl*to 4378 

6.10 6.10 -002 6 


431 4.12 Jul 96 411 111 410 6.10 -002 6 

Est. Sties 28600 Tub's, sates 74934 
Tue’sopenint 134386 up 2346 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBOT) inm-Mnwm 
207-50 16*6000 W 14530 16530 16430 16*70 -070 113167 

20960 16*60 Dec 94 145JQ 1*540 16*Sj 14470 -090*4679 

207-50 146.70 Jon 95 167.10 14730 16460 146J0 -0*0 IUM2 

207 JO 17860 MW 95 178*0 170.90 14960 17010 -OK 10658 

20760 17260 Mav 95 17060 17X60 172*0 17270 —160 S.V3 

20460 17*30 Jul 95 176J0 174J0 17520 17570 — 89D 3654 

18260 17530 Aug 95 17730 I77J0 (/itffl 174.10 -d» 4lJ 

18270 17800 Scots 17860 17860 17660 177.10 —0.90 504 

18160 176700a 95 18030 1*030 100-50 18030 —030 7 

18260 17430 Dec 95 18138 18130 1*030 18830 -Q30 18* 


—080 U44 
—025 62493 
—0.15 


+065 5392 
+03S 1^80 
+035 1,161 

iS 

-065 731 

+070 992 

+070 

+a« jog 
+0.15 
+070 
+ 03B 
+ 070 
+ 040 


07605 07a20Mw95 87449 07*56 074*2 07468 +27 1.171 

87522 06990 Jun 95 07440 07*50 074X1 0707 +25 582 

4OTS 06965 Sep 95 07*22 +25 386 

070.sa Dec 95 07401 +23 27 

Est. sates NA. Toe's, sale* 1631 
TUe'JOpenW 41,915 up 861 

GERMAN MARK (CMEHj fpernae-1 octet ■wti.SOJIOOI 
06606 03590 Dec 9^ 06*71 06*98 06*35 064*6 -38 72372 

06595 0381 D Mar 95 06448 0605 0640 0645* -39 4397 

06WS -:3W)Jun9S 0£«rj -40 476 

06525 063*7 Sep 9j 06471 -40 11 

EsLlties NA. WLKdes 31651 
Tur'SaWiW 76656 Up 192 

JAFANCSa YPI (CMER) spcrwn-1 eeMmuokiiamaaei 
0inii49auK » 5 g pBc94 ojn<B55D.mo2»unoi5«jnin8fl -724430* 
gfll 8SM0JX»68OMw t5 OjntgTOIin 0790001 M4Q0.Q1 0260 -74 2,709 
Mia*7aUM977*Jwi95 0310357 -76 *52 

OJn07731-GW200SapH 0310*50 _JB AS 

OjnM6aun§S3OO0C«S 0610541 —69 5 

Est.stie* NA Tue'S. sates 18,9*9 
Tufsoume* *8.180 up « 

SWISS FRANC (CMRl f per treno-l point emc asail Pi 
ams 06885 Dec 9* 07844 07860 07774 07788 -58 31601 

07920 07*20 Mar 95 07852 0.7882 07805 07817 — 5B 65* 

07920 07*66 Jan 95 07902 07902 07850 078*7 —58 60 

Est.lties NA Wi sates 1539* 

Toe's ooen Int 36750 up 609 


Industrials 


18200 17630 Dec 95 181 JO 181 JO 

Est. sales 13600 Tue's. sales 13681 
Tub's open W 88.139 off 652 


tsenr 

Laid law B 

Laewen Group 
London Insur Gp 
flAacmiii Bloed+l 
Magna mtiA 
Monle Leaf Fds 
Moore 

MewWtdge Netw 
No ro w de inc 
Noranda Forest 
Narcen Energy 

Nttwm Telecom 

Nova 

Onex 

Fetro Canada 
Placer Dame 

Potash Gore Sask 

Proviso 

PWA 

Quebecar Print 
Renaissance Enr 
Rta Alaom 
Seagram Co 
Stone Coraotd 
TaUsman Env 
Teles loae 
Telus 
Thomson 
TarDom Bank 
Trarsalto 
TrtnsCda Ploe 
Utd Dominion 
UM westburne 
Westcoast Eny 
Weston 

Xerox Canada B 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBOT) ... - , 

293* zziaoaw 2573 2573 256S 2531 -Ut 157** 

2667 2260 Dec 9* 2463 2*63 2433 2*62 —031 3862* 

2835 2263 Jen 95 2430 2*30 2*25 2*31 —033 8600 

2830 22.93 Marts 3*18 2*22 2Z92 2*00 -030 8379 

2805 23,93 Ixavts 23.95 3335 MJO 2373 —028 5654 

27-EJ 230071*95 2375 2175 2330 2333 -027 3,985 

3770 22.45 Aug 95 2360 2360 236S 2X45 — 0J0 588 

2*75 22,95 Sep 95 2X50 2330 DM 7X3B —077 304 

2360 7X10 Oct 95 ZUS 2140 2370 2X35 -0.15 124 

22-85 2260 DOC 95 23. *5 2365 2X25 23J0 —020 613 

Est. sate 17600 Tub's, sties 1*192 
Tue's open in 81615 off am 


Frankfurt 

AE G 1 56.40 1500 

AttoM5EL » 

Bav. Hypgoan k ^ 

|wveretrabk 

23923760 


AECl SiJ 

Allech 1?1 12] 

Anglo Amor 235-'.' — 5 

Bartow? 2950 r:i7t 

Blyvoor 11^5 ii 

Butlfls « S7 

DeBOCrS 9975 t3 

Ortetonleln 66-SG U 

Gencer 1* '0 13 JJ 

CFSA 1=S 133 

Harmonv JO 50 42 

Mignwcio Steel 3* SXffl 

Ktool 72.75 22 

NodDank Grp 03 0050 

Rondtonteln 57 71 5L50 

RU50W> ’ ,7 

SA Brew? 

St Hehma N.A. J7..5 

50301 3*50 J1S0 

Western Deco 220 215 

RSSSEJSSfe**” 


. Oanir.i? 

I CEPSA 

Dra^oii£.5 

Erc-ci 

[turifrala 

£CT.'6l 

I ■abocaterc 
I Tolclanlca 


l&OC «3 

2222 3 1(25 
1970 1®25 
S5-J 5*70 
T70 leO 
S3? 2=1 
0J5O 32(5 
SOU 3'90 

i 7 « r ns 


Sonofl 

Saint Gotain 
S.E.8. 

Stc Generate 
Sue: 

TTMrmson-CSF 

Tclti 

U.A.P. 

VOIEO 


23960 23870 

439 639 

530 530 

540 534 

257.90 ?5*B0 
138 139 

318 320 

U1.IQ 13360 
28650 281 


ntnur mmt9 


Tokyo 


CACAO index : 1*9*73 
Pruvicui ; inion 


[ Stock EiC-tagaelaOeA: 3CC35 
| Prevwtn : 7/778 


i illeonso 1T?*0 1 

j AnsKBlIe 109M ! 

I Auicjircdc oriy IB3S 
au Asricoltura 25S0 
! Bca Cramer ifal 4C9S 
! Bca f*cs Laucro ’22CO 1 
I Bca P:c- riovara 2095 


Sao Paulo 

Banco do Brasil 1* 
Banesaa 

Broocscn B7I 


AkolEiecfr. 
Asahl Chemical 
AsohP Gloss 
Bank at Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Canon 
Casio 

Del Nippon Prtnl 


gjjBd-K- 

»!g S 


London 

Abbey Nofl 35* l?* 

Allied Lyons 5.75 5 o9 

Ado Wiggins its 2.65 

Argyll Group iro 265 

Ass Brit Facds 5.07 5P< 

BAA *85 4.7H 

BAe *51 * o7 

Bonk Scotland ZCC UH 

Barclays ssr sia 


j eanccai Petna >825 
! BcoAm0ro:tono -Uto 
Bco Napoli rep 1330 
Bens toil —450 I 

] Creddo Italiana 2250 
Enttitcm Aug 7355 
Fertin 

Fiat tin . ... 

Firscn: Agroind 'OTRO \ 
Finmeccanica 1575 
Fondtonosea lino 1 


i Brohme 
Cemto 
ElDlntorai 
Mcubonre 
Lion: 

Pcranopancma 
Peirobras 
. Scum Cru: 
Telttras 
TelKO 
Usi+.tnas 


1 « 1470 
9JS 971 ! 
870 7.40 
750 -m 
8V S3 
357.49 354 
275 775 

3186131X50 1 
13 1X79; 
157 15* 

7450 7SS0 
S1JC 50JD 
*55 *56 

161 160 


Dalwa sSSrtites 


DalwaSecu 
Fanuc , 
Full Bank 
Full Photo 


vale Rio Doce 167^0 W7 


Varlg 10 5 1S5 

mSss'rSm™™ 


Gcnsrnii A8IIC JLT50 ■ 


mSKi 

HQtifflti 33J331JB0 

fSSZE"" 214 215 

HOTw 11 34X50 336 

!WKA H*14SS5 

K0ll30tt 60,60 W4 

KOFOTdl 5?) SJ3 

131 JO 129^ 

tss- s a 

ess: - a 

44460 *43 


Blue Circle 
BOC Group 


*24 *!0 

1J15 IjQ 


BOC Group 
Boats 
Bowoter 
BP 

Bril Airwave 
Brit Gas 


"sa !65 
ABC 83* 


533 5.31 

*40 03 


393 1.99 

36C 


Brit Steel 
Brit Telecom 
BTH 

CoDte Wire 

CoaBurvScti 

Cannon 


ITT 17? 
115 HO 


AM * 
*JJ *55 


Coats Viyeifa l.« L« 
Comm Union 564 4.9B 


i IFiL 

I laicamentl H97D ' 

1 Ha itras 

j r.Vdighcnca U5io ' 

! Montedison 

| Olivetti 

. Pirelli sna 

PAS 25650 i 

, Plnosccnto 4C0 

j 5an Paolr Tcrino +3M 
51 P ti-K 

5V.E 5425 

I 2.io Jpd 2335 

: stnrrfi L c ;i» : 

I 5 .el *435 

[ Toro ASile 2S10J 

| MIBTetomatlw: 11899 
I Prev loos ; 10947 


Singapore 

Asia Pbc Brew 1*40 1*30, 
Ce rebel BSD LIS 

City Devsffoemnl 76S 750 
Ode * Carriage 1360 1X20 
DBS 1070 1060 

BBS Land 462 *50, 

fe Levinpdon *2S *js 
F raser SNeave 1760 1*70 
Gt EOtifl Life 28.10 2750 
Horn Leong Fin *62 *J0 
.’ntixope SJ? .550 

Jurono SWovanJ 1X90 1XJ0 
Kar Hum J Cowl 2.19 .2.13 
Keooel 11.40 1150 

325 3M 

223 22* 

. . 1*20 1140 


Hitachi 
Hliocni CoOle 
Honda 
ita Yakado 
Itochu 

japan A! if Inn 

Kallma 
Konvii Power 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 
Komatsu 
Kutate 
Kyocera 
Matou Elec Inds 
Matsu Elec Wks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi KasH 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 


ftUKuMsfticora 
Mlliufond Co 
Mitsui Maine 
Mltsukashi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nikko Searings 
Nippon Kagaku 
Nippon OH 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Ytfteo 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
NT7 

Olympus Optical 


Courtauias *55 *5* 

ECCGruup_„ 36* xu 

Enterprise CH XW 36. 

Eurotunnel 253 !5T 

FiMrts { ! U? 

Fone -1? -iv 


Montreal 

Atcotidi toss tr*i 

3snk Msaireal :* 22"; 

bue •. c.’ «■ •: ti— 


Neatune Orient 
OCBC foreign <«+> «*«} 
O'seos union Bk *69 *50 
O'reaa union Ent 1*0 *25 
Semoawcne 1150 it 
Sime ShtpOMra W 167 
siiw Aercucca 2J5 rJ3 
- r : l- -s tern 100 14 


*1*8 J9SJ15a,M 57X0 57QJ1 5616 

5*96 511500 94 

Now 94 

5976 3806 Pec 9* 57X5 5756 5636 

5745 4016 Jan 95 

40*0 *1 45 Mw 95 5810 5835 5716 

60*5 41 86 May 95 5906 5905 5806 

■sraa oaoJtiss swjj 5««jj shoo 

*0X5 5325 Sep 95 *035 «L5 W3J 

6206 5.19 6 Dec 95 6056 6076 60*0 

6126 5750 Jon 96 

*210 55*0 Mw 96 

5876 5876 Mav 96 

Jul 96 

Eti. sales 26600 Toe's, sties 1*000 

Toe's open int 119,912 up 1406 
PLATINUM INMHU Sneu-Mncr, 


—1X9 142 

—1X2 
—116 

-116 92695 
—116 4* 

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SHORT COVER 


Durable Goods Orders Bounce Back 

WASHINGTON (AP) - Ortas ■? U.S. taaong^J” 1 ^ 
goods soared 6 percent m August — **» ^^t nsemj negriy. 

after a fedrop in July, ttegovarc^nt^dW^la^ 

^ Xhe Commerce Department said the rebound, expeaedDy 

' aJty^was led bySwd<miandfora^ob^mjdp^ 
In July, durable goods orders plunged 4 percent 
. auto as^nbly plaSts shut down for two weeks toretoolfj the 
now moddyrar. Ordere for durable items are at a record level and 
now have risen in 11 of the last 13 months. 




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Argentina Announces Privatizations 

BUENOS AIRES (Bloomberg) — The Argemtme government 
will sefl its three nudear power stations to private invcstOTS by April 
1995, Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo said Wednesday. 

Mr. Cavallo gave no details of the planned sales. Press reports 
have estimated the plants’ value at $600 million. 

Mr. Cavallo said the state also planned to sell the Bahia Blanca 
petrochemical complex by year's end. Airports, the mail service, 
and the rational min t will be sold during the second half of 1995, 
he added. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


Page 11 


EUROPE 






Volkswagen Sales Risin g 
Outside German Market 


% 





Reacts 

BONN — Volkswagen AG, 
Europe’s biggest carmaker, said 
Wednesday that its car sales ac- 
celerated by 9 percent in the 
first right months of the year 
although its domestic market 
remained depressed. 

Industry analysts said the 
sales picture was encouraging. 

VW said that its worldwide 
sales — including those of its 
Audi, Skoda and SEAT opera- 
tions— surged by 9 percent, to 
121 million, in the eight months 
and were up II percent, to 
260,000, in August alone. 

“These figures reflect the good 
orders we received in the May 
and June period,” a spokesman 
said. However, domestic sales in 
the first eight months fell 1 per- 
cent, to 644,000. 

The spokesman said Audi 
sales worldwide were up 28 per- 
. cent in August, compared with 


a year earlier, but it gave no 
figures. He said sales of the new 
A -6 model and special versions 
of die Audi-80 were responsible 
for the strong rise. The Audi-80 
will be replaced by the new A-4 
in the autumn. 

VW car sales in Europe, in- 
cluding Germany, were up 4 
percent in the reporting period 
and totaled 1.43 million vehi- 
cles. North American sales dou- 
bled to 76,000, in Une with 
VYTs plans to double its sales in 
the region this year. 

“Sales are even better than in 
the first half and the group has 
several new models coming 
through,” said Karsten Rahlf. 
auto analyst at M.M. Warburg 
in Hamburg. 

Analysts said the sales trend 
pointed to an improved earn- 
ings picture for the company, 
hi cb many said would swing 


Wj 


bade to profit this year from a 


loss of 1.94 billion Deutsche 
marks ($1.25 billion) in 1993. 

Analysis said VW was well 
placed to take advantage of a 
recovering European car mar- 
ket Its Golf model is selling 
well and orders for its new Polo, 
which hits the market next 
month, axe strong. 

■ SEAT Sees Narrowed Loss 

Juan Uorens, chairman of 
Volkswagen’s Spanish unit 
SEAT, said he expected its 1994 
loss to narrow at least 50 per- 
cent from last year's 1.8 billion 
DM, Bloomberg Business News 
reported from Madrid. 

“Our biggest task is to break 
.even in the last months of next 
year,” he said. 

Separately. VW's share price 
slipped 1.7 DM, to 454.80 DM, 
on reports it has called an ex- 
traordinary supervisory board 
meeting to discuss last year’s 
near-collapse of SEAT. 


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Smurf it Sets Rights Issue, Net Rises 


Bloomberg Business News 

DUBLIN — Jefferson Smurfit Group PLC 
announced surging profits and a rights issue on 
Wednesday, betting that a recent acquisition and 
rising demand for its paper products would 
brighten its future. 


The company said pretax profit jumped to 
251 .6 million Irish punts ($391 million) in its first 
50.7 million i 


•ike Idles T 


(At*! Jig I 




six months from 50. / million punts a year ago. 

. . At the same time, Jefferson Smurfit said it 
would offer new equity to its shareholders in an 
effort to raise 1 55 million Irish punts. Sharehold- 
ers will be able to buy one new share for every 10 
common shares held. 

The new shares will cost 3 JO punts, an 18.5 


percent discount from Tuesday's close of 4.05 
punts in Dublin. 

Michael Smurfit, Jefferson Smurfit’s chief ex- 
ecutive, said the money raised would help fi- 
nance the company’s recent acquisition of the 
paper and packaging businesses of Compagnie 
de Saint-Gobain of France. The cost of that 
purchase was about $1 billion. 

The purchase makes Smurfit one of the 
world's top 10 packaging companies. 

The company said sales from continuing opera- 
tions rose to 773.9 milli on punts from 749.5 mil- 
lion a year earlier. It will raise its first-half divi- 
dend to 1.40 punts from 1.23 punts. Jefferson 
Smurfiti shares gained 5 percent in London on 
Wednesday, closing 21 British pence higher at 421 . 


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EU’s Ultimatum on Steel 


Comptfedby Our Staff frem Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — European Union industry ministers gave 
the steel industry a final dea dlin e of Nov. 8 to meet its 
co mm itment to cut capacity by 1 9 million metric tons or else 
they trill abandon theirs steel rescue plan. 

If the ministers quit the plan, steelmakers would no longer 
be able to count on EU aid, warned the German minister. 
GQnther Rexrodt, who headed the ministers' meeting here 
Wednesday. The ministers are to meet again on Nov. 8 . 

The Union has postponed the deadline twice since the 
February accord that set up the rescue. But a spokesman said 
Wednesday, “November 8 , that’s clearly the final deadline.” 

EU steel companies had pledged to’ cut output by more 
than 19 million tons a year within three years and- to shed at 
least 50,000 jobs. (AFP Reuters) 


Boh and Campari 
Mix Drinks Units 
In New Alliance 


Compiled by Our Suff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — Koninklijke BolsWessanen NV said 
Wednesday it would merge its Italian beverage activities with 
those of the privately held Davide Campari-Milano SpA. 

BolsWessanen said it would acquire at least a third of 
Campari’s shares while the Italian beverage maker would 
assume total ownership of Bols Group Italia SpA. 

The alliance is expected to lead to synergies in production 
and distribution as well as in sales and marketing. BolsWes- 
sanen said. It is also expected to result in a solid base for the 
further growth of Campari, the Dutch company added. 

The companies declined to say bow much money would be 
involved. 

BoIsWessanen's shares rose 4J percent, to 34.8 guilders 
($20.07), making it the largest gainer for the day on the 
Amsterdam exchange. 

Arie Kwak, a spokesman for Bols, said that the merger was 


only a first step. “We are present in a number of countries and 
leGl 


so is Campari. We are deliberating if ii is possible to continue 
together.” While a full merger between the company is not on 
the cards, Mr. Kwak mentioned Brazil, Germany, the Benelux 
countries and Eastern Europe as other areas of possible 
cooperation. 

Davide Campari-Milano. a family business dating back to 
1860, makes Campari, a reddish, fortified wine drunk as an 
aperitif. Campari had sales of 450 milli on guilders ($259.5 
million) last year. Bols Group Italia makes Crodino. a similar 
drink based on red wine, and Cynar. an artichoke-flavored 
drink. In 1993, its sales had totaled 370 million guilders in Italy. 

Dutch-based analysts welcomed the deal which, they said, 
would help restore confidence in BolsWessanen.. The compa- 
ny’s shares tumbled last month after a drop in first-half profit 
disappointed analysts who had been widely expecting a rise. 

“There was a lot of mistrust," said Frans van Schayk. an 
analyst at Barclays de Zoele Wedd in Amsterdam. “This 
alliance is the first bit of good news in a long time for 
BolsWessanen.” 

‘This gives BolsWessanen a firm link to a well established 
brand,” said Roel Gooskens, an analyst at Van Meer James 
Opel. The agreement is expected to be finalized by January 
1995, subject to approval by auditors and the Italian authori- 
ties. (Reuters. Bloomberg) 


Deutsche 
Shakes Up 
Loan Unit 


mg the bank holding some U 
‘tifik 


BAe Looks at Fokker Stake 


The AaoaaeJ Press 

AMSTERDAM — Fokker 
NV raised the possibility 
Wednesday that British Aero- 
space PLC would take a stake 
in the Dutch-German aero- 
space group. 

“It is possible British Aero- 
space joins in the capital of 
Fokker.” a Fokker spokesman 
said after the first presentation 
of the new Fokker 70 jetliner. 

Fokker, its German parent 
company, Deutsche Aerospace 
AG. andBAe are in talk? aimed.. 


at developing a new 120- to 130- 
seal jetliner. 

Fokkeris marketing manager, 
Gert Meger. said be expected 
Scandinavian Airlines System 
to decide before the end of the 
year whether it will go ahead 
with an order of around 30 Fok- 
ker 100 jetliners. 

If that order goes through, 
the loss-making Fokker might 
raise its annual production to 
45 to 50 jetliners, he said. 


year, including the Fokker 70. 
which seats a maximum of 79. 

But while the company has 
the capability of building 70 jets 
a year, it will be cautious and 
not raise production too swiftly. 


Currently. Amsterdam-based 
Fokker builds, 


; about 40 planes a 


■ Inquiry Into Spanish Aid 

The European Union’s exec- 
utive arm said Wednesday it is 
investigating Spam's planned 
subsidy for the development of 
a 70-seat aircraft by Construc- 
ciones Aeronauticas SA, Reu- 
ters reported. 


Wellcome Gets 
FDA Warning 


Reuters 

LONDON — Shares in 
Wellcome PLC fell 
Wednesday after the com- 

f iany said it got a waning 
rom the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration. 

The stock closed 15 
pence lower, at 661 pence. 

Wellcome said its U.S. 
unit Burroughs Wellcome 
Co. received the letter, 
which raised concerns about 
its manufacturing processes. 


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Condoned from Page 1 

company pension plans as far 
back as 1976. 

R. Watson & Sons, a British 
consultancy, said British com- 
panies alone could be forced to 
pay as much as £10 billion to 
provide pension benefits to 
part-time workers. Cost esti- 
mates for other countries were 
not immediately available, but 
British costs were expected to 
be the highest because thecoun- 
try has Europe’s most devel- 
oped private pension industry 
and many part-time workers. 


Of potentially greater signifi- 
cance, the ruling could serve as 
a .precedent for extending a 
wide array of benefits to part- 
time workers, such as sick or 
maternal leave, said John Cun- 
liff. a partner at McKenna & 
Co., a firm involved in one of 
the court cases. 


Other industry officials pre- 
laic 


The court ruling requires 
part-timers to prove they were 
denied pension rights because 
of sex discrimination, but law- 
yers said that would not be dif- 
ficult since 85 percent of EU 
pan-time workers are female. 


dieted the actual cost would be 
considerably less, because most 
company pension plans require 
employees to contribute to 
them and the ruling required 
the women to make retroactive 
contributions. 

Peter TimberJake, marketing 
manager at the London insurers 
Legal & Genera], said most 
plans require workers to con- 
tribute 5 percent of their salary-. 
“That’s a huge amount of mon- 
ey for many people to find,” he 
said. 


“If I were advising compa- 
‘Pay up, T ‘ 
unliff said. 


nies, I would say, ‘Pay up, it’s 
cheaper,’ ” Mr. C 


The other cases allowed the 
court to clarify the implications 
of a pivotal 1990 judgment in 
the case of Barber vs. Guardian 
Royal Exchange, which ruled 
that the long-time practice of 
allowing women to retire at 60 
and men at 65 was discrimina- 
tory, but it offered few clues as 
to how companies could equal- 
ize benefits. 


Complied by Our Staff F>m Dupatcha 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG announced Wednes- 
day a reorganization of its 
mortgage activities, but it said 
the move was not linked to its 
losses in the collapse of the die 
Dr. Jtirgen Schneider AG real 
estate company. 

In the reorganization's first 
step, Frankfurter Hypoiheken- 
bank AG would be merged with 
Deutsche Centralbodenkredh 
AG to form Frankfurter Hy- 
pothekenbank Ceniralboden 
AG, the bank said. 

Another mortgage unit. La- 

beck er Hypothekenbank AG. 
would be linked to Frankfurter 
Hypothekenbank by a contrac- 
tual arrangement. 

Deutsche Bank said the plan 
was already in the works when 
JUrgen Schneider's real estate 
empire collapsed in April, leav- 




Frankfurt 
OAX : 

London 

■ FTSE l 00 Index '■ 

Paris 

CAC40 


aw - — 

\ 3300 




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• 2106 — 


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• 2908— ¥ 

rr ' T , 

law : — ^ :••• 

1964 

ay Prsv. % 

Close Change 

400.66 . . +l.t1 

1 SW T :~ ry 

1994 

Exchange 

Amsterdam 

J'A'g' "' “"v'A ' M J' J'A'.S’ 

.IMA . ' • 

• Index Wedrasd 

Close 

AD? 405.lt 

Brussels " . 

Stock Index 

7.197J1 

7,201.50 

-o.oe 

Frankfurt 

DAX 

2,068.11 

2,058.73 

+0.48 

Frankfurt 

FAZ , 

701^0 

779.08 

+0.32 

Helsinki 

HEX 

1,885419 

.•1,882.38 

' +0.1B 

London 

Financial Times 30 

2^5^30 

2,34020 

+0,69 

London 

FTSE100 

3.038.70 

3.008.50 

+ 1.00 

.Madrid 

General Index 

300.05 

297:30 

+0.92 

Milan 

MlBTEL 

11099 

10947 

+ T,39 

Paris 

CAC40 

1,904^5 

f,901^8 

+ais 

Stockholm 

Affaersvaeriden 

1^35.08 

1,816.96 

+ 1,00 

Vienna 

Stock Index 

439.30 

436.10 

+0.73 

Zurich 

SSS 

923.51 

919.93 

+0.39 


Sources: Reuters. AFP 


bitemaDonaJ Herald Trihroc 


billion Deutsche marks ($775 
million) in loons, most of them 
made by Centraibodenkredit. 

Mr. Schneider, who allegedly 
fled with his company's cash, fs 
the subject of an international 

manhun t 

A spokesman said the 
Schneider episode actually de- 
layed the reorganization, but 
analysts were skeptical. 

The bank said the reorgani- 
zation plan will be presented to 
the mortgage b anks * superviso- 
ry boards at their next meet- 
ings. The, banks' shareholders 
also must approve the plan at 
their next meetings. 

Shares of Deutsche Bank 
stock closed up 4.50 DM, at 692 
marks- (Bloomberg. Reuters) 


Very briefly: 


• Bouygues SA shares rose 2.4 percent following a report in the 
newspaper Le Monde that the French government had decided to 
award the company the license to operate a third French mobile 
phone network. 

• Russian officials said they were planning measures to halt gold 
exports sometime this year in order to boost profit for producers 
and buoy the budget. Valeri Skripchenko, a Precious Metals 
Committee official, said Russia was selling gold abroad at S12.S0 
a gram, while the domestic price was $30 to $40 a gram. 

• Groupe des Assurances Nationales, a state-controlled French 
insurer, said the country’s real estate slump meant that it may 
suffer a loss in the first half. Its profit rose 3 percent, to 41 4 million 
francs ($78.1 million) in 1993. 

• Fokker NV, the Dutch aviation company, and Deutsche Aero- 
space AG, its German majority stockholder, are considering 
development of a supersonic plane of an entirely new design for 
the next century, a Fokker spokesman said. He said such a project 
would lead to dropping plans for the Fokker 130. an enlarged 
version of the Fokker 100. 

• Mttropole Television SA’s public offering of shares was 40 times 
oversubscribed, according to French stock authorities. The com- 
pany owns France's M 6 entertainment channel. 

• Dow Chemical Corp. said it was considering the purchase of 
three chemical plants once run by the East German Communist 
government. 

■ Virgin Group said it would launch a vodka brand in Britain in 
November and that it would be manufactured under license by the 
Scotch whisky distiller William Grant & Sons Ltd. 


• Koninklijke Gist-Brocades NV, the Dutch biochemicals compa- 
ny. said that it had agreed in principle to sell part of its U.S. unit to 
LaUemand Inc. of Canada. BLvmberg, AFP. afx. Reuters. AT 


REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL 
MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE 


SOCIETE DE DEVELOPPEMENT AGRICOLE 
ET INDUSTRIE!. DU SENEGAL (SODAGRI) 


ANAMB6 RIVER BASIN WATER AND 
AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PHASE II 


NOTICE OF INTERNATIONAL PREOUAUF1CATTON 

1. The Government ol the Republic of Senegal has obtained various loans 
agreements from the SAUDI FUND FOR DEVELOPMENT, the ARAB 
BANK FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA, the OPEP FUND 
FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT, the ISLAMIC DEVELOPMENT 
BANK, the WEST AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK. In order to finance 
the cost ol the phase II olthe Anambe river Basin water and agricultural 
development located In the Kotda region of Senegal. 

2. SODAGRI on behalf of the Government of Senegal (Ministry of 
Agriculture) and its quality of project sponsor wishes to invite potential 
bidders to prequalily for the following works: 

* tst package: AL BAS SAM Dam of Niandouba 

* 2nd package: Pumping Stations 

* 3rd package: Agricultural Land Developmenls 

3. The interested firms may submit their qualification lor one, two or three 
of (he above mentioned packages. 

4. This notice of International prequaiification is opened to firms eligible to 
the financing ol the Saudi Fund (or development, or the Arab Bank lor 
Economic Development of Africa, of the Islamic Development Bank, of the 
OPEP FUND lor international Development and of the West African 
Development Bank. 

5. The prequaifficafion documents win be available from September 20ih 
1994 and may be obtained by paying the sum of FIVE HUNDRED 
THOUSAND (500.000) FCFA which is not refundable and by writ! mg to: 

Monsieur le Directs ur Gdnriral de la SODAGRI 


9e ftage, Immeuble Fondation King FAHD 
‘ t DJlLY MBAYE & Macodou ND1AYE 


Bid 

DAKAR-5 ENEGAL BP 222 
FAX: 00 (221) 22J54.D6 
TEL: 00 (221) 22.16.21/21.04.26 

6 . The prequafificalion statement written in French, will not be accepted 
and shipped back to the owner if received at the above address, after 
November 20th 1994 at 10:00 AM. 


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Page 12 






























































































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Mitsui Group 
Bids on Airport 
At Clark Base 

Agcnce Ffnncc-Pre&e 

mtbeMnsorti^woddb^sv- 


. INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTFMKFR 29, 1994 


A Tale of Two Market Interventions 

Seoul Fears Heights, Tokyo Worries About the Pits 


' N . : ^ by Mitsui Construction Co- 
has. bid to help build a $2J5 
bQliou international airport on 
»■.; the site of the Clark Air Base. 

■ north of here, by 1998, an offi- 
»■; r dal said Wednesday. 

Victor Lhn, head of the Bases 
Conversion Development Au- 
thority, said the alliance includ- 
• Li ed British Airports Authority 
and Construcaones & Auxiliar 
: Ferrocarrfles SA of Spain. 

He said Mitsui had invited 
the conversion authority — a 
• : “ government agency in charge of 
converting former U.S. and 
Philippine military bases for d- 
; ; vilian use — to join the alliance, 

■ ; f adding that the “detailed share 

structure among the foreign 
members will be decided later.*’ 
/ An authority spokesman, Ed 
Javier, said the foreign compa- 
nies had submitted separate 
bids for the project earlier, but 
. met later and agreed to form the 
•, ' consortium and come up with a 
fijm offer. 

But Mr. Javier stressed that 

■ • ' : Manila was still open to pro- 
^ posals from other groups. 

; Mr. T.fm said each com pan y 


cn a specific task, with Mitsui 
assigned as the project's overall 
coordinator in charge of pro- 
curement, construction and fi- 
nancial arrangements. 

BAA is to draft the conceptu- 
al design, Operation and man- 
agement of the airport termi- 
nals, while Construcdooes & 
Auxiliar Ferrocaixfles would 
build a mass-transit railroad 
system connecting the airport 
to Manila, about 80 kilometers 
(SO miles) away. 

“This is primarily designed 
so that all these areas and scope 
of work, including off-site in- 
frastructure, will be handled by 
experts in these fields,” Mr. 
Uin said. 

Manila is already committed 
to building a control tower, run- 
way extension, administration 
building, airport and naviga- 
tional utilities and access roads, - 
he said. 

Mr. Lim said the consortium 
would operate the airport for 25 
years, after which it would turn 
the facility over to the Philip- 
pine government unless a new 
contract was signed. 


Sega and Atari link Up 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispmches 

SUNNYVALE, California — Sega Enterprises L td , and 
Atari Corp., two of the wodd’s major video game companies, 
said_ Wednesday that they had signed a pact that rails for 
sh a ring licenses and for Sega to buy shares in Atari. 

It also calls for Atari to dismiss legal claims against Sega for 
- patent violations. 

The Japanese company will purchase about 4.7 million 
shares of Atari common stock few a total price of $40 million 
and will receive worldwide, nonexclusive rights to much of 
Atari’s extensive library of patents, including a number tba- 
t extend beyond the turn of the century. 

Atari gets a prepaid royalty of $50 million, minus attorney . 
costs, for its more than 70 U.S. patents. (Bloomberg, Reuters) 

RAISE: Firms Reluctant to Pay 


Continued from Page 9 
in favor of incentive-pay pro- 
grams that reward employees 
for their performance — and 
that of the company — during' 
good times, but carry no obliga- 
tions when times are tough. 

Mr. Kilmartin of Wyatt 
Group said half of all the com- 
panies his finn surveyed would 
offer some sort of bonus plans 
to other salaried employees 
within the next two years. 
Twenty percent of all firms ex- 
pect to extend the program to 
nearly all employees by 1996. 

“The most noticeable trend 
in the compensation area by far 
f is this rush toward variable or 
-incentive pay,” said Mr. Kil- 
martin. 

In its survey. Hay Group 
found that for companies that 
offered them, bonuses and oth- 
er incentives account for 5 per- 
cent of pay among lowes-level 
employees, 15 percent among 
low-level managers and 30 per- 
cent for mid-level managers. 

But if the across-the-board 
pay raise has fallen into disfa- 


vor, some observers said it 
should not be counted out. 

In many companies, the 
threatened defection of a few 
key employees can trigger a bid- 
ding war that eventually ripples 
through the company’s entire 
.pay structure, as colleagues and 
co-workers demand parity. 

Companies that post back- 
to-back years of record profits 
may find that they cannot plow 
profits bade into new equip- 
ment and rising dividends with- 
out suffering a deterioration in 
worker morale. 

“Companies play a risky game 
when they refuse to share a re- 
spectable share of their profits 
with employees,” said Mr. Kil- 
martin. “When the economy is 
improving like it is now, it’s 
probably wiser to stay ahead of 
the competition in terms of pay. 
That way a company can avoid 
playing the kind of catch-up 
games that can wind up costing 
them more in terms of money 
and morale when it’s all over. 
“Employees are not blind,” he 
said, “and they are not stupid.” 


RISK: Central Banks Make Plea 


Coatimed Iron Page 9 
as they are managed by each 
company. 

“By contrasting individual 
‘firms’ prior risk assessment with 
‘.subsequent outcomes, such dis- 
closure would provide scope for 
‘comparison of firms’ relative 
‘risk manag ement performance 

■ over time,” the report stated. 

Ideally the code would be- 
come a market standard as fi- 
nancial firms providing such 
' data would reduce thar bor- 
’ rowing costs and increase their 

* access to loans while nonfinan- 
’ cial companies would be re- 

* warded with a stock price trad- 
ing at a higher price-earnings 

; ratio than competitors that do 
> not divulge this information. 

* “The evolution of financial 
: trading and risk-management 
» practices has moved ahead of 
. the public disclosures that most 

■ firms make of information that 
1 is relevant for such decisions,” 

■ the report said. “As a result, a 

* gap exists between the precision 
with winch a firm’s manage- 

* mem can assess its fin a n ci al 
( risks and the information avail- 
! able to outriders. 

“This asymmetry of infonna- 
; tion can cause amisallocation of 


’ amplify market disturbances. 

• During episodes of market 
' stress, this lade of transparency 
. can contribute to an environ- 
: Tren t in which rumors alone can 

• cause a firm’s market access and 
funding to be impaired.” 

“For shareholders, creditors 

■ and counterparties in financial 
r markets to allocate capiuu effi- 
- den tty, they need to be able to 

■ assess the risks to which firms 

‘ arc exposed and which, in thar 

l -aew, should be reflected in 
. hare prices, funding costs and 
; credit decisions." 

. The thrust of the report is. It 


is in the firm's self-interest to 
co mmuni cate its risk-manage- 
ment capabilities to the market- 
place.” 

Noting that “no consensus 
exists on a single best method of 
measuring market risk expo- 
sures,” the report said that as a 
star ting point such disclosure 
should be: 

• Meaningful in the sense of 
expressing how a particular 
company assesses ana manages 
risk. 

• Understandable by provid- 
ing an adequate context or par- 
adigm for relating details to the 
overall concepts. 

• Comparable so that it can 
provide a basis for comparison 
among firms. 

• Verifiable in the sense of 
being independently auditable. 

The report said companies 
would not need to reveal pro- 
prietary information about spe- 
cific market operations. 

Most important, the report 
does not seek to impose a stan- 
dard operating procedure. The 
approach is purposely flexible so 
as not to stifle development of 
risk- manag ement concepts and 
disclosure practices. 

Nevertheless, the report 
made dear that banking super- 
visors are were keeping their 
options open about imposing 
regulations. The Committee on 
Ranking Supervision, which is 
currently developing a frame- 
work for measuring market risk 
for capital adequacy purposes, 
“may in due course consider 
specific supervisory issues in re- 
lation to disclosures by banks,” 
thepress statement said. 

Ine report also said that its 
proposals are “not a substitute 
for continued efforts by the ac- 
counting profession to improve 
the accuracy of information 
contained in balance sheets and 
income statements.” 


Bloomberg Butouss Netr. i 

TOKYO — In South Korea, stock 
prices have set record highs recently, 
while Japanese stocks fallen to levels not 
seen since early ApriL For the govern- 
ments of both countries, that means one 
thing: it is time to get involved. 

Whenever the Nikkei Stock Average 
takes a dive, traders said the government 
tends to pump money into the market 

until it regains its legs. 

Meanwhile, across the Sea of Japan, 
traders said officials in Seoul were trying 
hard to get Korea’s stock market to fall. 

Authorities in the two countries deny 
that so-called price-keeping operations 
exist at all. They say prices find their own 
levels, free of government intervention. 

“We don’t use public funds for price 
keeping,” a spokesman for Japan’s Min- 
istry of Finance said. 

But analysts and investors take gov- 
ernment intervention for granted. 

To Korean officials, some stock inves- 
tors have had too much of a good thin g 
Fueled by an 8 percent annual economic 
growth rate for the first half, shares in 
the Korea’s big industrial conglomerates 
have been soaring. 

But shares in small and medium-sized 
companies — the ones average Koreans 
buy because these shares are less expen- 
sive — have stalled or even fallen as 
Korea’s traditional textile and shoe man , 
ufacturers struggle to keep up with the 
country’s changing economy. 

Analysts said the Korean government 
has sought to avoid the kind of boom- 


bust cycle that has plagued other South- 
east Asian stock markets recently. 

Traders said that when stocks reached 
a 1994 high on Sept. 14, the government 
told the Korea Development Bank to sell 
shares in Korea Electric Power Crop.; it 
also directed the National Federation of 
Agricultural Cooperatives to sell shares 
of Pohang Iron & Steel Co. 

Both shares fell and the overall market 
followed them down, falling 1 percent 
before the day was out 
Meanwhile as Japan's economy recov- 
ers from a long slowdown, the Nikkei has 

Analysts and Investors 
take government 
intervention in 
the stock markets for 
granted. 

fallen relentlessly to its lowest levels 
since early ApriL 

Weighing on stocks are fears that too 
many companies will tap the market with 
new listings and a persistently strong yen. 
Though up nearly 12 percent on the year, 
the Nikkei has tumbled 10 percent since 
early June. Most of those losses have 
come in the last month after the closely 
watched Japan Telecom Co. new listing 
flopped, renewing fears of a share glut. 
Enter Japan’s powerful Ministry of 


Finance. In addition to its broad regula- 
tory powers, it also directly controls the 
investment of 30 trillion yen ($300 bil- 
lion) in pension funds and savings. 

Traders said those funds could flood 
the market with enough force to turn it 
around, as happened after the Nikkei 
slid as low as 14,309 two years ago. 

When the Nikkei average fell below 
the 20,000 level on SepL 8, traders said 
public funds began flowing again. The 
effort has not matched the drive of two 
years ago, and the goal apparently is not 
to propel the Nikkei significantly higher, 

Traders said the government seemed 
determined to head off further declines 
by bidding up key shares when they slip. 

Government funds were widelv credit- 
ed with sparking a rally on SepL 13 by 
raising bids for shares of Japan Tel ecom, 
a new issue that soured overall market 
sentiment when it fell 10 percent in its 
first two weeks on the exchange. 

Why not let the market have its way? 
For one thing, plunging prices are a 
threat to Japan's recovery. 

Other market observers said govern- 
ment intervention was self-serving. 

The Ministry of Finance hopes to raise 
nearly 1 trillion yen when they sell off 
666,666 shares of Japan Tobacco. The 
shares will then be listed on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange on Ocl 27. 

So far, the Korean and Japanese mar- 
kets have not responded well The Nikkei 
has slipped 1.9 percent in the last four 
trading days, while South Korea’s market 
dosed at record highs on three of them. 


PORT: Jardine Goes Against the Current as Hong Kong Turns to China 


Cuntiiraed from Page 9 

the controversial project and 
accelerate plans to build other 
facilities dubbed CT-10 and 
CT-11 already on the drawing 
board without Jardine Mathe- 
son's involvement. 

“We will not walk away from 
this project,” said the spokes- 
man, adding that to do so 
would set a precedent of “a po- 
litical-correctness test for ev- 
eryone eventually” that could 
sap investor confidence in 
Hong Kong. 

But analysts think the pros- 


pect of a jammed Hong Kong, 
harbor will actually provide a 
catalyst for the expansion of 
container ports across the bor- 
der in southern China. 

“All of the current Hong 
Kong operators will benefit 
from saturation in the short 
term. It will give them greater 
pricing power," said Mr. Sto- 
rey. Two companies now domi- 
nate the world's busiest con- 
tainer port: Modem Terminals 
Ltd. and Hutchison Interna- 
tional Terminals, controlled by 
Li Ka-shing’s Hutchison 
Whampoa Ltd., a conglomerate 


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areas: labor economics, including International migration, or energy 
economics. 

The successful candidate will have a doctorate in economics from a 
respected university, and will have an excellent publication record in 
standard economic journals. Full command of the English language 
is a must, and the ability to speak, read and write Arabic would be an 
advantage. 

(4) Research Analysts 

with expertise in one or more of the foflowfng areas: contemporary 
political institutions/Weologles of Southwest Asia, Central Asia (NlS) 
or the Middle East. 

The successful candidate win have a doctorate in political science or 
International relations and will have a demonstrated capacity lor both 
independent and collaborative research. Excellent communications 
and analytical skills are a must and should be reflected in relevant 
mjOflcalioos. 

The Center, a non-profit institution. Is engaged in research and 
policy analysis of international. political, economic and social issues, 
and is equipped with state-of-the-art data processing and 
telecommunications facilities. Each position offers a competitive 
compensation package that Includes a salary commensurate with 
qualifications and experience, housing and complete medical 
benefits. A delailed curriculum vitae - Including personal profile, 
professional experience, education and publications - should be 
accompanied by a statement describing the contributions the 
candidate feels <s)he wffl make to the success ot the Center, and be 
forwarded before November 30. 1994. to: 

Recruitment Committee 
P.O. Box 4567 

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 
Fax: (9712) 767-799 


EUROPEAN MANAGEMENT 
HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR 

Our client, a well known multinational corporation 
{industrial sector), wishes to appoint a Human 
Resources Director for its European Business 
Region, based in Southern Germany/lake Constance 
area. An excellent career opportunity has been 
created for an experienced professional, assuming 
the functional responsibility for subsidiary operations 
in Europe (10 units, total staff of 3000). For this 
challenging position we are seeking a HR- 
manager/director, age 36-45, preferably Eu citizen, 
with university level education and a solid experience 
in the major fields of human resources management, 
i.e. management development, recruitment, 
compensation and benefits, corporate 
policies/culture. The scope of this position and the 
level of responsibility demand a result oriented 
personality, capable of dealing effectively with 
corporate and unit general management. Willingness 
to travel and fluency in English are musts. German, 
French and other language capabilities are desirable. 
For a first contact please write, fax or phone in 
confidence to Personnel and Management 
Consultants Inc.. P.O. Box 315, CH-8030 Zurich. Tel. 
441(1) 383 47 33, Fax 441(1) 383 70 68. 


that enjoys close relations with 

China 

But of the existing container 
terminal owners, Hutchison In- 
ternational's new deep-water 
port at Yantian stands to 
the roost from Hong Kong's fu- 
ture congestion. 


For investment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


QUALIFICATIONS: 


PRESIDENT AND CEO 


International Student Travel/Exchange 


EB&CTB SI This internationally-recognized non-profit 
UmmAMmI organization has an annual budget of S200 million 
divided between the development and promoUon of accredited 
educational exchange programs and providing travel services 
directly to students and faculty. The organization has staff of about 
700 people operating from 70 locations In more than 10 countries, 
with strong presences In the U.S.. Europe, and Asia. The PrestdenL 
reporting to the Board of Directors elected by the member 
universfUes. has direct responsibility for global staff in both the 
program and trawl service lines. The President Is based at the 
International headquarters )n New York City. 

Candidates for this position will have the 
following career background: 

• Previous bottom line responsibility for a business or organization 
with revenues/budget or at least $100 million. 

• A graduate degree, and compatibility with university faculty and 
administrators' 

• Previous work experience In the U.S. and previous education, 
residence, or work outside of the U.S. (language fluency In 
addition to English would be a plus!. 

■ A successful record managing and supervising a multi -country, 
muJU-ofBce enterprise. 

This organization Is seeking a leader with strong communication 
skills, high personal Integrity, a proven reputation as an 
International manager, and a demonstrated commitment to multi- 
cultural Ism. Running this large enterprise with significant 
commercial activities providing services to universities and 
students globally requires demonstrated capabilities with both 
academic and business environments. 

Nationality is open: U.S. Work Permit /residency is not required of 
candidates. This Is a global organization and an equal 
opportunity /affirmative action employer. 

BEgnSWBI Review of candidates begins September 26. 1994. 
mhHhmh Nominations or letters of application with resumes 


should be sent to: 


Mr. Pomeroy. Consultant 
55 East 69th Street - 14th FL 
New York. New York 10022 USA 
Tax: (212) 750-0574 


! DIRECTOR OF MARKETING EUROPE FOR 
COMMUNICATION OPERATING SYSTEMS 
(OUTSIDE PLANT) 

The company is the world leader in electrical/electronic 
connection devices. 

The ideal candidate is in his mid 30s or 40s, with a minimum of 
10 years experience in Sales & Marketing or Product 
Management with Telephone operating companies and/or 
Telephone contractors (installation and maintenance). 
Fluent in English, an effective communicator. Knowledge of other 
European languages a plus. 

The Director of Marketing Europe for Communication Operating 
Systems may be based in most of the major European countries. 

Please send your CV to: Box 828, IHT, Via Cassolo 8, 20122 Milan, Italy 


4Vr0r0fE, one of the fastest growing Companies in the 
exciting Gaming Industry is looking for a sales oriented, dynamic 

EXECUTIVE 

The Ideal candidate would have experience In the Gaming industry 


1 would be an asset. 

if you speak German and are wHfing to travel extensively, preferably 
have an MBA or equivalent, please send your Resume in lull 
confidence to: 

AVTOTOTE Europe, Etag Electronic Totalisator AG 
Baarerstr. 10, Ch-8301 Zug, Switzerland Fax +41.42.21-16.17 


OVERSEAS REPRESENTATIVES 
EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS 
S&S Worldwide is a Connecticut USA based manufacturer and 
distributor of a varied Ene of arts, crafts, games, activities and 
physical therapy aids, used by schools and healfreare fedtiSes. We 
are seeking overseas representatives to promote our product Una to 
local distributors, with particular interest in Germany, Austria, Italy 
and Scandinavia. Qualfied representatives wffl have a history of 
successM sales to distributors to the educational and/or healthcare 
fields of their home country. Experience to dsaBng with US 
companies, itoenity to EngBsh, and knowledge of import regulations 
are important qualifications. Per consideration, ptease forward a 

summary of your qualifications and expected compensation to: 

S&S Worldwide Attn: Overseas Search 

76 Mffl Street, Colchester. CT 06415 USA Fax: 1 203 537 2868 


Page 13 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


Hbng v.,; • Singapore 

Hang Seng ** ; ‘Ji. Straits Tbiies 


Tokyo. 

Nikkei 225 





;'lW4-;.,y - v- = >..1994 

change ’• index '•• • 


Hong Kong > Hang Seng • 
Stngaporijj. Straits Times " 
Sydney J y.- 1 /^Ordinaries 'v 
Ttokyo > -I^kef 225 ; \ .. 

KuateUirojw " Composite 
Bangkok' 1 - SET 
Seoul. . Compcste Stock 
Taipei-. . ‘ .Weighted Price 

Manila ' PSE 
Jakarta . ■; Stockindex 
New Zealand NZSE-40 
Bpmbay ■ ■ National Index 
Sources: Reuters, AFP 


Wednesday Prev. . . 

Close ' Close Change 

9,69349 9.61024 +0.87 

2.33069 2.28984 +1.78 

2,014.20 3,01380 +0.02 

19,507.60 19,468.89 +0.20 

1,140.83 1,149.60 -0*78 

■1 fiSUKT 1 .50855 -057 

1,039.79 1,052.01 -1.16 

Closed 7.102.10 - 

~ 2,877.69 2,934.27 -1.93 

502.13 507.24 T5T 

2,06860 2.083.58 -0.72 

2,094.30 2.10&31 -0.66 


IntmotiftiuJ Herald Tribune 


“HIT is best positioned to 
absorb the surplus if Yantian is 
ready to handle the traffic out 
of China,” said Mr. Storey of a 
company preparing to raise up 
to $1.7 billion in an issue of 
floating-rate notes to finance its 
expansion in China, Britain and 
the Bahamas. 


Very briefly: 

• China will have a good harvest this year, second only to last 
year’s record 456 million tons, despite severe floods and droughts, 
the Ministry of Agriculture said. 

a Knmagai Gumi (Hong Kong) Ltd., a construction and real estate 
company in Hong Kong that is 6.4 percent-owned by Kumagai 
Gumi Co. of Japan, said pretax profit before exceptional gains fell 
40 percent in the first six months, to 75.6 million Hong Kong 
dollars ($9.8 million). With exceptional items, including the sale 
of a hotel, profit soared to 732 million dollars. 

• Petroa Corp. reported a first-half net income of 1.76 billion 
pesos ($68.8 million) as sales rose and costs fell. The Philippine oil 
refiner, which went public last month, did not provide compara- 
tive figures for 1993. 

• Rashid Hussain Bhd. said the stock brokerage was negotiating 
with the Malaysian government to take over one of the largest 
pieces of undeveloped land in Kuala Lumpur’s high-rent areas. 

• India's Finance Ministry has approved a Euroissue by the state- 
owned overseas telecommunications monopoly to help* finance an 
expansion program. The government hopes to raise at least $650 
million by selling equity in Videst Sanchar Nagam Ltd. 

• Amoco Production Co. is pursuing two energy exploration 
contracts in Vietnam. 

•Japan’s August motor vehicle exports fell 8.S percent from a year 
earlier, reversing a 0.3 percent rise in July, the Japan Automobile 
Manufacturers Association said. 

A P. A FT. Bloomberg, 


EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 


EUROPEAN IAIOUB MARKET 
PH—MHt •w pto j fi un fr in Ewnpa 

far 6 memhi or rxm, lor free, good 
payment, free transfer no awmsson. 
Wc send oppfcntan farms at a ort 
of 10 pomfc free home: Heaie 
eonsock M ediation Sonne. Bieite 5K 59, 
0-37154 Northern, Germany. 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

DYNAMIC. 34, RMH LADY seeb 
Opportumy n Pw» based raubmo- 
honaL Ful European Ironing {1 yr 
erpenena) 6#*, Spmsh, mofat- 


btHnwa previous world mwe&ig. 
Comnwrection fadttas in ini emn. 
lonment. Good temper and dodcaiEd. 
Yew company has a vaaro far a 
dan cesaxnt with my qucMcanora. 
Pleats FAX MY drafted I.H.T. ref- 
erence Bo* 3726. [33-1) 46 37 93 7P 


lutanndiunU Organization 

is bolmg for wi 


to ergrmize at short note o very 
complex coflfame m East Aaa FVsr 
das experience in c o n f ernncn mov 
ogemert, capaMty to network at 
htfied (web tmd n depth geopoKcd 
a® econonac knowledge regured. Re- 
sponses under cipher J 113751 e 
PufaSdtto, izil Geneva 3. 

WSe*Y Consme Produce PublisKing 
department seeks Book CoordwXor 
for dnftcJ pxd and itiuil cp o f d w c ft o u 
d European Regional Office. Engfafi 
mother tongue + fiuert French, ex- 
ce&f# writing sUb. flsew send 


handwnnen terror, xioy lequreraert, 
Of. any paUshed writing samples ft 
photo * 0 : E. Cot m on. 10 Ul&e 
farwenue P-P38S5 Nosy la Grad 
MUUMADONAL KEQUKB self mo- 
tivated buarvuss devefapmenr executive 
bared in Poto. Excepnond re- 
mmernhon podpge. 5end CV to: 
Ut«UN WT1. 3 rue Boudalowf. 
/owy Pms, France. 

EXECUTTVES AVAILABLE 
RB4CHMAK 581 fanner 

TOP EXECUTIVE 

of rsceor US rapmros n Europe/ 
Afrfcn, wift the broodest experience m 
civenrfied areas of harness, toofang far 
CQMMET'SJRATt POSmOM Reriv 
Bear 372Q, IHT, F-92521 NeuBy Cdx 

NUN SAU5 DKECTOrTSST 
too. smoa w el travelled ft dyranc, 
oged 50, FcA ht erx intend serfs a job 
ramedaeiy n any part of the world 
Product A-l who could Set freezers ai ■ 
AJaska. Very positive ft o pemric. 
Always sees a Kgfa across a runnel 
Contod MNF - Far # 92-21-556 

1829. 

JAPANESE EX-ORUMAT, MA1I, 33, 
extensive mtematond experience. 
MBA. ftienr Engfah/FrendVPbrt- 

ugueso, serfs imagement passion irr 
Europe. Japan Or BraoL (ran Jenny 

IHSTeLW KMffc tf B2 fl. 


AMBBCAN NATIONAL Mnged 

fFrendi/lhfton), seff stoter, goab- 
onerfed, leadershp ablties, 15 years 
open s ree « European mfommon 
technofe^ rtftrfnr, serfs new dxd- 
fenqe. ForMCV fe 4 33 93404277 


JAPANE5E BANK M PAMS serfs 
young English or fr ench mother 
tongue blnjpjd A5SETANT far eco- 
nanc r e se onJi work . Unweryty 
De^ee or equndent required. Send 
handwritten letter ft CV to Bax 3728, 
litT. 92521 Neu3y Cedes, France. 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
WANTED 


SBtiOR US. CmZBt bodtrfor 
German born, ex -PS man. ndnp t n bfa, 
hrff-jewnh, o seeking 
a ch oH engiPQ opportwity as 
MUUUmXML AND 
COSMOPOLITAN 
PISSONAL ASSISTANT 
Con reboots. Ovm a*, pwao n ote 
Peugeot driver. W1 oho consider 
phfantropic work and/or help to 
honcicnpped. Vieinrty Bod based. 
Write to: LT. OpamiieavPort- 
fagerod, U7941?Bad Mmgee. 


B= YOU W9 HELP WITH startups, 
rurrvacrondi, mtenm manageraen, 
consulting, shor or long-term assign- 
rewfc. m Europe, Asa or Africa, then 
col us. We're a culturally sensmvo 
exeatovn team with hgh level v»1 
management, marketing, sales, pro- 
motion and human resources experi- 
ence, urnersdy education and novel- 
savvy. Phone/fa* (8521 8595019. 


ARAB BILINGUAL EXECUTIVE w*h 
wst ckvercified expenence (2D years) 
and contact m the Gulf and Mdde 
East ragons oi mark e ting and mon- 
ogen®m a serfmg o chJenpng poo- 
eon woh a reputotle organaahon. 
Contact: The Advertiser, P0 8a* 
32*34 Rumaotto 2555 Kuwait. Trf/ 

fat: 19651 56286Q4 

BUSINESS Wim RUSSIA AND QS 
MufocSsoplined Executive, with wol 
estabfahed expenence and connections 
in the former USSR serfs patten with 


knot. ForMCV far 433 93404277 
FRENCH WOMAN. 36, business 
borfground ft wefl traveled, fluent 
German ft Engfeh, serfs p o s it ion in 
mil business- Tdfafr fl| 4508 13 72. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


URGENT 

AGS (NO. MOVING 
sots 

SALESPERSON 

to fade Anncan efientdr 
Baseiafay 4 awn iMu n + car 

Send hondwrtten CV & photo to: 
AGS. PAHS 
11 Berfntsd Gdfcrf 
_ 92 230Gemev«« 

« fatenEm de to Gftes Tarts 


CORRESPONDENTS in Hanover, 
stodhokn & fats for quarterly with 
faqs on omasdigns & mternerfond 
.'Wremgs. Provide nfannaion ft 
OOzsianrf arfcfca gn 2000 
Hanover}, Eupa 1997 sSrfhrfm ft 
I me r n aionJ Bum of bpos te ns 
(Pans}. Poyraem S100-S35Q per amde. 
Write, Edfcr, Wortfs far. P.O. Bu 
339. Cone Madera C* 94976 USA 
fat 415/924-8245. 


in the farmer USSR serfs poster) with 
Para based nternanond cwnpony or 
as free icnce consultant. Effective 
S«X*V rw< htoness opcortmifea. 
Please far H3-1) 43 78 14 
DRIVEN, AMBmoUS AMBDCAN 
woman, late tweraes. fluent m Russian 
and French, treiwtedfle of SfXrisA 
expenence m rnternationd marketing. 
5wta Paru-basfd position with repu- 
table firm. Write: LZ. 225 Furman 
face, Lyndfwr. NJ 07071 USA 
RMWASBt 20 yean experience n 
US and Europe, residani « Europe. 
Seeks posters, fteriy to: Bon 3723, 
LHT, 92521 Newfly CedS, Fronce. 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


BNOISH MOIW TONGUE 
BUNGUAL SECRETARY 
, ^ASStSTANT/ TBAN5UTOR 
to Tap Gmcudve bnwntena I Group. 
Pprtert command of spoten and v w iB e tr 
French frwufng speSng, Frendt ihwt- 
Iwrd apprecetei Mo u we m postran 
imd Srf»y. based Pans 8th, far ropufly 
nvoapWe corrfdm, aged 25-32 with 
wrftait appeaianee. PfecM »bnt 
rejwto and ahoto to 

shktive Executive assstants ‘ 

91 Ffag Sl Honor h, 75008 PARIS or Fax 
(1J « 66 15 oO, merttotv Shy! Vdrf 


WgW SMANSBB YOUNG LADY 
SGQEIAKY, free to travel far two 
weeks tne to the Ui. Pteose phone 
Peril |33-1) 4504 1542 (}0an-2pm) 


SECRETARIES AVA1IAMJE 

EXECUITVE 5EC2ETA4Y Many yean 
oversea expenence hi ofl and end 



EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

FULL-TIME ENGLISH TEACHERS 

ggrffe, MS M ni 


totemtriiotid Reoutoneitf 

Every TVairscfay 
Cortoct Philip Oma 
Tel.: (331)46 37 9336 
Fax:(331)46379370 

« ytjur nearest IHT oftce 
or rtprasertafive 


Page 14 


NASDAQ 

Wednesday's 4 p.m. 

TMs list compiled by the AP. consists of the 1,000 
most traded securities In temw of dollar value, ft is 
updated twice a year. 


12M0W>i 

Hdh Low Stock 


WTaaBn- 

S%I2 ABC Roll 
30, MV.ABTBKt 
H'.alTVaACCQl 
M 9WAC5Ent 
4! 3) Va ACX Tc 
A 31 AJDC T#4 
16 UVaADFWx 

3&ikhb&; 

33. IS. AST 


J l% 12V* Acclaim 
7% 13 AcmoMel 
IS’.J 7'-iAOtal 
?4%15V,ACfVdiC 
28 V; lBV,Acxiom 
23' i n' .Aoaptcs 
76V, 10 AdSotin 
37 V, SO AtfieSv .16 
37 la Adobes* JO 
IPASOHAflhW 
28 'i BWAOvHlt 
I7W liWAdvTLB 
11'* 4% aovTIss 
464S6V,Aouanias JO 

SS?? S«t‘ ■" 


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d 2612329 34% 31% IPu +2% 

14*3 34 34% M% —V) 

-.23 1 7 36 25% 26 - 

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. 7111 7% 6% 7% _ 

J IS 1187 29 'A 28% 28% _ 

S 14 621 27% 26% 26% — ID 
_ _ 3245 U IV 17*. 18V* + '.k 


16% 10 Agrucoc .100 .7 64 4071 |4U/ H 144k 144k - 

16% BWApoum - - 131 12V) 11% 12 

3B'< la"aA5-Exp J4 .V 18 87 28% 27% 77% _ 

6S%45", Akxo 1.74« 2.9 _ 7V 59% 5V%5*H*1 
?P) «'<a Alan tec .„ .„ 481 15% 14% 15% ■»% 

2B 1 ') IBWAmcink .40 1> il 430 24% 74% 34% —Vh 

IV a 1 1 VkAliJIki s _ » K7 13% 12% 13% — % 

28% 23 A lex Bid .88 14 17 OS 26 25V, 24 * W 

71U>u 6% AQOkR _ 31 2084 HH, 1»% 20% *■ I 

IS 1 ') 7% AlianPti _ .. 773 8% BW 8% * % 

24V U 7WAklSMli _ 2V 603 73V) 22% 23 _ 

3ZW?2y*Ante<JGp .60 2.0 7 126 30V* 29% XV, *% 


iS'l X 1 ', AbhaBra _ MU 13 T3Vk— % 

39V, 31% Altera _ 21 485V 20% 26% 28"% +«„ 

30' 1 li’-iABRlMC _ _ 3471X31% 30 30% * % 

34",ln"j Allron ... IS 5M 19% 18% 18% — % 

92 47% AmerOn 01c . 91 469 70 68% 6V »% 

XV.20%ABnl>r .72 13 8 630 27% 21'V>. 21% — % 

17% OV*AmBldo _ 291 17 16*% 16% + Vu 

19*3 14 AOosV&v .16 .9 SI 40 18% 18% 18% _ 

g ia*A ACpAUd J4 1.7 19 718 14% 14", 14V, — % 

% iTWAmEOale _ _ 1777 28V, JTk 28% _ 

34% If.AmFront _ X 465 24 73 % 33% — % 

34'i 2S-.AGre«4 M 1.9 16 1938 79% 38’a TV* +V» 

74% 5%AHHnepS _ 12 85 T'* TV, 7% * Va 

77% 16% AMS -. 20 2571 23 % 21% 22% *1% 

17% 6’>ANVWF 15 223 *V, 9'.« 9V. ♦ % 

22 12%AmMbSot _ _ 6 16% l*% 16% *% 

M'T 14% APwrCnv 32 8609 31 19'/* 30V. a-lVi 

15 IIWAPuttfeh 03e J „ 1021 13 1? 12% — Hi 

23% 17% ASovPL _ 8 203 18% 18% 18% _ 

3»' ■ 23% AmSupr - 2 79% 8k 79% 

17’ 'a ID'iATravCl _ 12 439 16% 16 16% *% 

26 1 ') 19' aAmfod J4 14) 22 213 24 23% 23% a% 

ST' i 34% AltHW - 19 1361 54% 53% 53% —Via 

33’* B’.AmlchCa XX .7 12 1456 10V. ID’a 10% *Vu 

17' , n%AncnBcn - 11 2686 16'.k l«%t6<*p +Ve 

I9W IOV,AnChGm _ 17 IDI 17% 17% 17% *% 

49 19% Andrew 5 _ 32 4937 48% 44 «V. *3% 

71% 13 Andros _ 10 64 16% 16% 1*W _. 

38' IS", Anlec _ „ 37261 40% 25 94'.*— S*. 

9% I’.Aperrus -. - 1302 8 7% W H + ** 

19*i l4’ ,Apoi»ce .. .. dl6 17% 17 17 

38% 22 AomeC A U 21 7336 34% 33% 


23% 17% ASavFL 
3*' i 23'-, AmSupr 
17' 'a 10') ATravol 
26'. a 19'aAmlod J4 

ST' * 34% Amoen 
33% B’ .AmichCo XX 
17% ii%AncnBcs 

19V, lav, AnchGm 

49 19% Andrew 5 
21'- a 13 Andros 
38”, IS", Aniec 
9% I’.Aperrus 

l«i 14", Apogee 
38% 33 APMeC 48 
18 1 ', 12% ApiSOU 5 ST2 
75"a 11 ActcbeeS 414 
II 'k 3%APdExlr 
75 13% AcdDotl 

33 14 APdlnov s 
S*’»3B'/,4PldMl S 
71 16 ArborOrg J4 

25 13 ArbOTHI 

31 UTViaArtHtltl 

32 13% ArcICO S .19 


12% AvISou i M .1 43 589 17% 17% 17% ♦ % 

II AOcbees 414 J 35 1481 IB 17V, 18 *% 

3%APdExlr _ _ 1S35 11% 11% 11% — % 

13% APdDetl _ _ 537 70% 18% 19>A *■% 

14 Apdlnovs .. 34 823 21% 20 21% + 1% 

76'/, ABWAA1 j _ 201B733 46% 44% 45 — % 

16 ArborOro J4 JJ 21 100 19% 19 19% * % 

13 ArborHI _ 22 34 30% 19V, 20 + % 

PViaArtHfitl - B 2701 IS’I, 15 15 — Vi 

13% ArdCO 5 .10 7.0 79 2557 19% 18% 18% _ 


33>*2»%AroiGc 1.16 U 9 ZU 20% 29% 30% -V, 


30% 12% Anwsy 
IS’ a 10% Art: Best 
33% 16' a Armor 


_ *4 90 17% 77 17 — Va 

J 21 268 14 13% 13% —'A 

2.0 20 284 22% 21% 22% »{k 


37% 18 ArnddS AO 2.0 18 ISO 19% 19 


34' , 8'aAnsfl 
37>a 1 1% AscenoC 
13% 7>iAshwrrh 
46 34 Aspctn 
34"a 23 ASOCmA 
33’, 21 % AsdCmB 
70% 1 1 ASKC 
34% 77' a AslarloP 
3fl%2i% AnSeAlr 
33 1 1 Atmel s 
37'.allViAlfioStr 
76"; 15 AuBon 
9"„ 4% AuraSv 
11% I’lAUUK, 
66 37 Auhx» 
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30 V. 13V. Autarof s 
39% 17 AvidTdi 


12 5774 1071. 10V. 10% *% 

_ _ 866 26% 24% 26 *1% 

.. 71 2877 9% 8% 9% +> 

-. 26 1184 39 36'k X -*% 

-.1288 66 25% 25 25% *% 

-.1263 6 25% 25% 25% _ 

-.11 40 13% 13% 13% — % 

_ _ 2188 29% 29% 29% * % 

J2 1.4 15 1377 23V. 23 23% ♦% 

_ 29 6782 31% 30% Xlk 6% 

_ _ 172 24% 23% 23% — % 

„ 27 1033 16% 15% 16% 

-. _ 7411 6 5% PV„ *% 

15 V! r . . S' a .% 

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- 15 2505 23% 22% 23% <-% 

_ 40 14*5 19% 18% W% _ 

_ 2810627 34 32% 33% — % 



T 


f ’• • •• 

*•/ - Si 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


MMentti 

Hl0»i LOW S»« 

15W 7% BrltOV _ .... . 

S %11 BHSdTc _ 5hl IBVa ITVl 1HV1 +% 

10%Brcff%n „ 27 14V. 13% 14 — % 

16 6%BdwvSey _ 463 14% 14V, 14% — % 

59%3T%BnsdSr 52 3240 54% 53% 53% +% 

36%3a%BWvnOc _ _ 127 36 35% 35% _ 

18% II Brogksm _ 17 17 14% 14% 14% .. 

fi^o’gPF ^ "306 A lk8e=» 

11% *fk Brunos J6 19 19 1551 9% 9 9k- — Vu 

MmSU? U6 33 IT 3 k ffiJk^R 

WfikESSte !.i7« ao !! fA m 

11% 5%Co«t _ - 1995 9% 8% 9% *H 

174k SMiColoene - - 1908 94k fA 9% — (,u 

23% OhCdlMO - 21 210 13% 12% 13 — V* 


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Every Friday 
Contact Fred Ronan 
Td.: (33 1} A6 37 93 91 
Fax; (33 1)4637 93 70 

or your nearest HT office 
or representative 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 



Investing in New 
Infrastructure for Europe 


SKADDEN 

ARPS 

SLATE 

MEAGHER & 
FLOM 


Berlin - November 3 & 4 


*7t <4. ivTMniinni md < , 

ilcralDs^kenbunc. 


For further information on the 
conference, please contact: 

Brenda Erdmann Hagercy 
International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre. London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71)836 4802 
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Page 16 




Season Delay Nears 
As Players Rebuff 
NHL Tax Proposal 


The Associated Pirns 

TORONTO — Gary Bett- 
m&n seems resigned to 'a post- 
ponement of the start of the 
National Hockey League sea- 
son. Players are not giving him 
any reason to think otherwise. 

Bettman. the league's commis- 
sioner, gave the players union a 
new proposal during eight hours 
of negotiations on Tuesday, but 
Bob Goodenow, the union's exec- 
utive director, described the offer 
as “unacceptable." 

“We still have a lot : »f or? to 
do and I am getting; -.iTiC-Tvjd 
that time is gelling *a»d 

Betunan before he headed mck 
to New York to await l call 
from Goodenow to see if .*nd 
when talks would resume. 

“As lime inarches on 1 will be 
more and more concerned." he 
said. “We have some wide rivers 
to cross. Are they so wide and 
so deep that they are incapable 
of being crossed? I hope not 
and I think not, but the more 
time we spend together and the 


less progress we make, my level 
of concern rises. 

“It is not impossible, but I do 
not wont to hold out too much 
optimism." 

Betunan lias said he would 
decide Friday whether to post- 
pone the start of the season, 
which is scheduled for Saturday. 

The NHL’s new proposal 
deals with a tax plan to help 
finance small-market teams. 
Goodenow called it a variation 
on an old theme. 

Marly McSoriey. Los Ange- 
ie- kings deferiM-uv.. .Mimed 
tli.v. ihe players v.vre w Wing to 
stay out the whole season if 
owners do not budge on the 
issue of taxing salaries. 

“We’re prepared to shut it 
down." he said. 

Flayers interviewed at exhibi- 
tion game sites were disenchant- 


ed by the recent developments. 
“One 


The NBA: 
Timeto 
Worry Yet? 


By Clifton Brown 

iVriv fork Times SerruY 

NEW YORK — There 
has been no progress in ne- 
gotiations since the Nation- 
al Basketball Association's 
collective bargaining agree- 
ment expired in June. Ard 
the two side*, ■vr.v-r 
apart on ma««'-r • 

Those fac?t >).. ■ c 
concern that :hc N3A it 
flirting with the same kind 
of labor turmoil that cur- 
tailed the major league 
baseball season and threat- 
ens to delay the start o;‘ ;<• 
National Hockey U : ; ... 
season. 

Should NBA fans be 
worried about seeing their 
season interrupted as well? 

“I don’t think fans 
should be concerned yet." 
said an optimistic but cau- 
tious Russ Grantk, the 
NBA’s deputy commission- 
er. “If we’re in the same 
position a month from 
now, we’ll have to see.” 

More will be known after 
next Wednesday, when the 
league’s Board of Gover- 
nors meets in New York. 
There has been ’all- 
some owners are c •-.« : -- 
ing a player lockout ar«v. 
Thanksgiving, but accord- 
ing to Granik, that is sim- 
ply speculation. Training 
camp will open ?.* sched- 
uled on Oct. T yj’d u 
the league’s go;. • ; : • 

agreement 
lar season op 7 * 


person" — Bettman — 
“has taken the bull by the horns," 
said the Kings’ star center Wayne 
Gretzky. “I think he has backed 
himse lf into a comer by saying 
there wiL be no hockey on Satur- 
day. It is very disappointing." 

“It’s tough to anticipate what 
will happen Saturday, but right 
now we’re a little disappoint- 
ed,” said John Vanbiesbrcuck. 
goalie and team representative 
for the Florida Panthers. “It 
doesn’t look like much pro- 
gress. Wi r>; ; ; h?r .i lucra- 



Romanian Gymnasts ? f Strike 
Shakes Loose Overdue Money 


By Jere Longman 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The idea of 
athletes going on strike, which 
has led to the cancellation of 
baseball’s World Series, has 
found resonance in the most 
improbable of places: among 
teenage female gymnasts in Ro- 
mania. 

Less than two months before 
the world team gymnastics 
championships in Germany, 
the favored Romanians staged, 
if not exactly a work stoppage, 
then at least a disruptive slow- 
down in training, the effects of 
which reverberated to the top 
levels of the Romanian govern- 
ment. 

Beginning last week, up to 10 
Romanian stars, including a 
two-time Olympic champion, 
refused to train indoors on the 
balance beam and uneven bars 
and in the vault and floor exer- 
cise. 

Instead, they limited them- 


interview that Belu might have 
orchestrated the slowdown be- 

•rzisss. Tgjgs sgj* 

almost un- national team in oucnaresi. 


nasties officials, the national 
{warn coach and one of the 


selves to jogging and other out- 
achvity, demanding that 


Andy Oaii/Rniiro 


Bob Goodenow, left, NHL union chief, and Marty McSoriey of the Kings after talks. 


door activity, 
they receive prize money prom- 
ised by the government for re- 
cent performances at the world 
individual championships and 
European championships, ac- 
cording to interviews with; 


i gym- 


Congress Is on Deck in Baseball Dispute 


rv, . i .- . .ii..:. : .ike :L. 
“Union . k v.v couldn't 
set cast il-i Ki-' -.T*. The-, want 

7.. f , ve 


1- : 




■../irked this week iov.aixi nego- 
tiating a collective agreement to 
-..'place one that expired ScpL 
1‘. !OQ' 

•• . -. the 


Bv Murray Chass 

Yr: Yn'k Times Service 

'VASHINGTON — The U.S. capital, 
which hasn't had a baseball team since 
1971. has become the only place for major- 
league baseball in the absence of games 
and labor negotiations. 

For the second successive week, a congres- 
subcommittee will bold a hearing 
.--ltd a', ending the season-shattering strike. 

Tit s T'ur- j.s- V deals with a 

,v r\. .:;ics bill that would 

inpoe binding bit ration on the dis- 

pute if no agreement is reached by Feb. 1. 


Representative Pat Williams, Democrat 
of Montana, introduced the bill in the 
House on Friday. He will head the hearing 
Thursday as chair man of the labor-man- 
agement relations subcommittee of the 
House committee on education and labor. 

Among those scheduled to appear are 
Richard Ravitch, the owners’ chief labor 
executive; Charles O’Connor, general coun- 
sel of the clubs' labor relations committee; 
Gene Oxza, the union's associate general 
counsel; Betnie W illiams of the Yankees, 
and Ord Herehiser of the Dodgers. 

The bill would create a three-member 
arbitration panel that would conduct hear- 


ings into the reasons for the dispute and 
baseball’s economics. The panel would have 
the power to subpoena books and records 
from the dubs and witnesses to testify. It 
would be made up of one person designated 
by each side and a third selected by both 
rides. 


Congress is scheduled to adjourn no' 
later than Oct IS and probably by Ocl 7, 
so the bill is unlikely to go anywhere this 
session. But if the players remain on strike 
when Congress returns in January and 
Williams has developed any support for 
the idea, the bill could move forward then. 


have been risky, 
imaginable, under the dictator- 
ship of Nicolae Ceausescu. But 
with democratic reform in Ro- 
mania has come the freedom of 
dissent. And in this case, any- 
way, the slowdown appears to 
have worked. 

Prime Minister Nicolae Ya- 
caroiu intervened, promising 
that the overdue money would 
be paid. 

[ f The Sport and Youth Min- 
istry called me last night to say 
our prime minis ter had swept 
away all the bureaucratic barri- 
ers that held up normal prize 
payments,” said the national 
team coach. Octavian Belu. 
Reuters reported from Bucha- 
rest. 

(“It only took one phone call 
and within two hours there was 
a positive solution after my girls 
waited five months with unhon- 
ored promises,” he said.] 

“It was a misunderstanding,” 
Adrian Stoica. general secretary 
of the Romanian gymnastics 
federation, said in a telephone 
interview from Bucharest. 
“Now the problem is solved.” 

Lavinia Milosovici, 17, who 
won two gold medals at the 
1992 Summer Olympics in Bar- 
celona, said the work slowdown 
began Sept 21. Belu said it was 
Saturday. Both denied Stoica’s 
claim that it bad been a one-day 
strike. 

The confusion was moni- 
tored from the United States by 
the most famous Romanian 
gymnast of all, Nadia Coma- 
neci, who defected in Novem- 
ber 1989, a month before 
Ceausescu was overthrown, and 
now lives in Norman, Oklaho- 
ma. 

Comaneci, who said she 
spoke with Romanian officials 
Tuesday, said in a telephone 


Such tension is normal, she _ 
said, considering that the junior - 
athletes may be the ones 
ly competing in Atlanta ui 1 9%. 
Others said Belu might be con- J 
cemed about money owed to . 
him. * 

It is common for athletes to 1 
receive award money for per- 
formances at Olympic Games , 
and world champions tups. For . • 
example, an American gymnast a 
who wins a gold medal at the 
1996 Summer Olympics in At-., 
lanta will be paid $15,000 by »• 
the United States Olympic , 
Committee. ■ ? 

A Romanian law enacted 
July, Stoica said, is designed to 
increase the award money w-j 
athletes, who are heavily taxed 
for their winnings. The tax is.j 
approximately 65 percent, Ro-j 

mnninn officials Said. k 

The new law languished be- " 
cause it lacked the signature «. 
from a government, official.' 
Hence, the gymnasts were not^ 
paid. 

Now the athletes have been * 
assured that the check is in the' 
mail Or in the case of Mflcso- 
vici, the money will be waiting 11 
at the airport. - 

She was due to be paid 7 
Wednesday for a bronze medal 
and a silver medal won at the,* 
world individual champion- *, 
ships in Australia in April. She j 
was to receive the money at the.J 
Bucharest airport when she left * 
for a competition in Burning- ‘ 
bam, England, officials said. 


In a month, they said, she will ' 
be paid for gold, silver and- 
bronze medals won at the Euro- * 
pean championships in May in 
Stockholm, where the - Roma-"' 
nians won the team title; 1 

I® 


■V 


C is- 






"Vie undezitunu where we 
are on the big issues and it may 
well be there are some funda- 
mental disagreements on how 
to approach some of those is- 

"If - •. J: . the 

same problem, there may be 
two or more schools of thought 
on how to approach it,” he said. 
“And those are the gaps we are 
trying to bridge." 

Goodenow said it was be- 
coming dearer to players that 
Bettraan’s ultimate goal is to 
c.m *2 1 As-' 


'-r-'l'T; -t. 


Japanese Leagues 


UEFA Cup Results 


Central Leone 



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Pel 

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66 

59 

0 

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fp 

0 

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— 

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65 

62 

0 

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2 

Hanshin 

61 

65 

0 

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60 

65 

0 

480 

6 

Yakult 

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467 

71* 


CJiunlchl I. 
Yokohama 
Yakult w. 




SelOu 
xintoTsu 
C— el 


Wednesday's Resorts 
Yomlurl 0 

vs. Homhln. ppd_ rain 
Hiroshima. bpO* rain 
Pactflc League 
m L T Pet 

73 SO l 5 n 

61 a 2 552 

l’ P I 540 


5 

6 V 1 

8 


..." u. cap 

un salaries, especially for the top 
payroll teams in the league," 
Goodenow said. “The problems 


-s 




FIRST ROUND, SECOND LEG 
BckcKWiM 1, TOKSHkMk KOmydiiOO 0 
Scorer: sondor Csato (77ltv penally). Tek- 
stiichlk wins 4-2 an asantoate- 
Mypa i, BoavMa 1 

Scorers: MvPa — Nlkto Gronholm ITSIh); 
Boavlsta — Artur lIMh. penalty). Boavlsta 
wins 3-2 an aeoresate. 

Dioama DiKtomal X TrataaMpar 3 
Scorers: Dinamo Buena rest — Gheorahe 
Ceauslla (7th>. Rodu Nlculescu Wist), Laar 
•ntlu Lloo (83rd). Trobronspar — akrlkd 
Orhan (21st. 23rt), Aldlceak Sonne* (list). 
Trabzonspor wins 5-« on oagreoatn. 
ElntracM Frankfurt 2, SCT OUmpilo 0 
Scorers: Mirko Dlckhaut (Wh). Anttwnr 
Yeboah (84th). Frankfurt who 3-1 on aggre- 
gate. 


'Aednndav's Result* 
Lotto X Nippon Horn 2 
Seibu vs. Dalai, ppa. rain 
Kintetsu vs. Orix. ppcL. rain 


.'■■r.'.rcVc v 


?C'<5tcn 1st dor 
— . Ir ircredil 


Slavio Prague Z AIK SokM 2 
Scorers: Slavio — Jan Suchoparek (26th 
penalty). Roaak Beibet (35th); AIK —Ok* 
Lktmon (36th). Gary Sundpren (72nd).ABBre- 
gate score 2-2. AIK wins an away goals. 
lOSMSi Moovcd I, r wrote Enschede 3 
Scorers: Klspest — Beta Hies 158th penal- 
: : Tv.-cn:i« — Edwin Vurens (34th), Juul 
iilct man ;«7mj Michel Boerebacti (87tn).K)- 
soast Motived wins 5-t on ogg regate. 
LOIesfrom IV Bordeaux 2 
Scorers: Zlmedlnde Zidane (2nd). Laurent 
Foumhsr nsih). Bordeaux wins 5-1 on aggre- 


gate. 

Skonto Maa B. NapoB 1 
Scorer: Renata Bino(31stl.NaPoll whnsM 
on aagroBate. 

Nantes 3, Rotor Volgograd 0 
Scorer: NlcaiasOuedeeI20iti.6]th}.Patr1oe 
Loka (75th); Monies wins 5-3 on ogorngate. 
Kateerskratern 4, Aknmes t 
Scorers: Kaiserslautern — Kuko w&th. 
MWi), Wagner ISNtt), Haher (Blst)s Akrnnos 
— Giskaon (88th). Kaiserslautern wins 8- 1 an 
aggregate. 

Maritime ), Aorou 0 
Scorer: Paulo AJves WMI.Morlthno wins l- 
0 on aggregate. 

FenerOahee L Canoes 5 
Scorers: Fenertiahee — Bulent uygun 
(59th); Cannes— ChrlsfoFtie Hortovllle (23d, 
61st), Johon Mkoud (51st), Patrick Vieira 
(77th), Tayfur Havutcu [20th mimrle, own 
goal). Cannes wins 9-1 on aggregate. 
Dynamo Moscow A RF5 Strains | 

Scorers: Skossens (07d); Aggregate score 
1-1. Dynamo wins an away goats. 

Arts Salonika 1, SKS Katowice » 

Scorer: AntonbSapounlzis (47lh). Katowi- 
ce wins 4-3 on panalttes. 

FC Copanfeogao 1 Stovan Bratttfaya 1 
Scorers: FC— Nielsen (45m penalty l; Slo- 
ven — Nigra <24th). Bratislava wins 2-1 on 
aggregate; 

Odense BK 5. FC Unfleld 0 
Scorers: Odense — Nedergaord (6ltv85lhl. 
ScMoenberg 125th. 42d penoltvi, Thorun 
(40th); Odense wins 6-1 on aggregate. 
Garnik Za&rm 1. Admtra Wacker 1 
Scorers: Garnik — Henryk Bauszynkl 
(30th). Admlra — Germody Utavchenko 


(45th): Admlra Wodcar wins 641 on aggre- 
gate. 

Newcastle X Antwerp 2 
Scorers-. Newcastle — Robert Lee (11th). 
Andy Cole (26th, 39th, 00th), Peter Beardsley 
(36th, peoqltartfiAahmrp — Klekens (79th), 
Severeyns (77tti) ; Newcastle whm 10-2 on oo- 
oregate. 

llnnsbrucfc 5. Bro un 10 TTWlsl 1 
- Scorers: Innsbruck— Corny (5th). stoeger 
(30th). Danefc (39th,5Btti), JanescMtz fvoth); 
TUtllsI— Arvektdze (38th); iranbnick wlnsS- 
2 an u ggregate. 

Tmieborg Z BlndtUuni 2 
Scorers: TreUeborg — Joachim Kartsson 
(52nd. 85m); Btockbum — Chris Sutton 
()7thl. Alan Shearer (B4ttt); TreUeborg wins 
3-2 on aggregate. 

Otarlerol Z Rapid Boch a reot 1 
Scorers: ChoHerol — Tlbor Balog (90lh), 
Jean Jacques Mlsso (9131); Rapid — Fond 
Tiro (47th); Rapkt Bucharest wins 3-2 on ag- 
gregate. 

Attdohc Bilbao X Anorthosli 0 
Scorers: Athletic — Julen Guerrero (17Ri). 
Andreas Ponaylotou. (own goaL 23rd), Jena ro 
Andrfnuo (B8th); Bilbao wins 3-2 an aggrt- 
gatn. 

PSV EindhDven A Bayer Lcverkusea l 
Leverkusen wins 5-f on uw rrgote. 

Piraa Z Vitesse 0 

Scorer: Gianfranco Zoic card, 72nd); Par- 
ma wins 2-1 an aggregate. 

J u rent w s 5, CSKA 5o«o 1 
Scorers: Juvenlus — FabrtzJa Ravonelll 
(9th. 75th. 79th. 81st 83rd); CSKA — Mtthorskl 
(90Ui); Juventus wins 7-4 on aggregate. 


Leak) t pyaonto Minsk 1 
Scorers: Lazio — Giuseppe FavaiiJ (61st). 
Alan Bakslc [74th 1. Diego Fuser (B4lh). Os- 
trawsky (own goat); Dynamo — Kochuro 
(9th); Lazio wins 4-1 on oggregate. 
Deporttvo Corona 4, Rosenborg 1 
Scorers: Deport Ivo Bebeto (81st, osm. 

1 14th ), Donato 1 oenatlYlD7th) .-RojwnxM-9 — 
Brattbakk 1 92nd); Deporttvo wins 4-2 on asr 
gregate. 

Marseille 1 Otymntakos • 

Scorers: Tony Cascor Mo (53<d,B9th), Jeon- 
Mare Ferrerl (88th); Marseille wins 5-1 on 
aggregate. 

5 porting Lisbon Z Real Maa rU I 
Scorers: Sporting — Sa Pinto (3rd i.Oeotmo 
Cruz (3lst); Real— Michael Loadrvpr 14m); 
Aggregate score 2- 2. Real wtnson away goals. 
Stan Z Apolloe Lhtioaoi 2 
Scorers: Skm — Mark) (B'hh). Orlando 
n01sl);Umossol—KrcnHirevlc(49lh).Spoi- 
larich(66th),C9epavtc(77mi;51onwins5-4an 

agaregote. 

Motherwell % Borasala Dortmund 2 
Scorer: Karlheinz Rledle 154th, 64th); Bor- 
usskt Dortmond wins 20 on aggregate. 


Calgary 9, Ed m onton 4 
San Jose 4. Pittsburgh 9 



•■ ■■■ BASEBALL 
American Leaaue 

MILWAUKEE— FlrwtG*™ Cline* hart tno 
coach, ; _ 




NHL Preseason 


Tuesdays Games 
N. Y. Rangers Z New Jersey Z 
Boston 9. PhUadcMila 0 
Tamsm Boy Z Florida a 
Vancouver 5, Winnipeg 3 
Dallas 3. U» Angelos 2 


Nottonal League' 

COLORADO— Announced ttxrv will not ex- 
ercise the option on the contract M Howard 
Johnson. outfMder. Removed Ty Van Burh- 
leo. first baeetnan; Darrell Sherman. outfleM- 
an and Bruce Watton, Pitcher, from Hie 40- o 
man raster. MONTREAL— Flrad Wallace 
Johnson, Expos' Gutf Coast League hitting „ 
Instructor. v 

ST. LOUIS Recalled Terry Bradshaw ond 
John Mabry, outfielders; Gary Buckles, John 
FrascaTore, Frank Cknorelll. ond Steve Dlx- . 
on, pitchers; Tripp Cromer and Darrel Dealt, * 
InfleldWrfram Louisville, AA. Dan Chaiawskv ' 
and Aaron Hotbert, tnfVrtd«Ts; Doug Creek, 
Pitcher; end Basil Shabazz, outfielder, from 
Arkansas, tl. 

(? 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 
CLEVELAND— Announced the retirement , 
ol Larry Nance, forward. 

DENVER— Signed Mark Randall, forward. - - 
and Rvan Yoder, guard. -r 

N EW JE RSEY — Named John Wrtrd ossts- 
tont coach. 


DENNIS THF. A 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 



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THE FAR SIDE 


BLONDIE 


DOONESBURY 


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information 

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the MONEY REPORT 
every Salurday 
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Enclave Track Club 
Vflopes to Recharge 
American Miters 

By James Dunaway 

Hew York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — Have America's rollers — the heirs to the 

. mantle of Glean Cunningham, Jim Ryun and Marty Liquori 

.. ran out of gas? 

Steve Scott, the U.S. record holder in the mile at 3:47.69, is 38. 
Jeff Atkinson, the winner of the 1,500 meters in the 1988 Olympic 
trials, has had a string of injuries and at age 31 his future is cloudy. 
Jim Spivey, the only other American men's 1,500-meter Olympic 
' . finalist since 1976 (fifth in 1984, eighth in 1992), is 34. 

So, where is the next generation coming from? 

The answer may be in Washington, where Frank Gagliano, 
Georgetown University's 57-year-old track coach, has assembled 
an accomplished group of young middle- and long-distance nrn- 
> nets who call themselves the Enclave. 

The groqp includes six Americans who have bettered four min- 
utes fcM* the mile or 3:42J2 for its metric equivalent, the 1 ,500 meters. 
The three fastest — Steve Holman, 24 (3:50.91), Bill Brake, 24 
(3:56.83) and Ron Harris, 29 (3:58.03) — are scheduled to run 
Sunday in the Discover Card MDe on Fifth Avenue in New York. 
m The Enclave got its start in August 1991, when Gagliano began 
- coaching a small group of Georgetown graduates who wanted to 
continue miming with the goal of the 1992 Olympics in mind. 

“I saw the need, for graduate athletes to continue training while 
-/ they were working or going to grad school,” said Gagliano. The 
group look its name from a comment once made by Frank Shorter 
about the benefits of top athletes training together, which he 
, called the enclave effect 

After two of the group, Holman in the 1,500 meters and John 
Trautmann in the 5,000 meters, made the Olympic team for 
-- Barcelona in 1992, other runners indicated their interest and 
Gagliano decided to make a formal arrangement 
Two years later, Reebok became a sponsor. Most of the club's 
runners now compete under the name Reebok Enclave, although a 
few have previous shoe-company commitments. 

Currently, 15 men and 9 women, who are graduates of a dozen 
universities, are training under Gagliano and two associates. Matt 
Centrowitz, who coaches the men. and Ron Helmer, the women’s 
coach. Hie Enclave's goals are centered on Atlanta and the 1996 
. Olympics. 

The Fifth Avenue Mile's three Enclave entrants are looking 
7. forward to Sunday’s race for different reasons. Holman, a 1992 
•7 Georgetown graduate in English who has put off his law school 
plans (“at least until 1996”), is coming off a successful summer on 
the European circuit It included that 3:50.91 mile on Jnly 22, the 
. fastest by an American in three years. 

Burke, who starred for Princeton and won the 1993 American 
championship at 1,500 meters, is in his final year at the University 
of Vuguoia law school. He missed much of this year with a 
hamstring strain and is eager to improve on his 1 992 Fifth Avenue 
Mile, in which he finished third. 

Harris, a 1987 Naval Academy graduate, is a Desert Storm 
veteran who works at the Pentagon. Primarily a 5,000-meter 
runner, he is also the defending Fifth Avenue Mile champion, 
haying outkkked several faster tmlers in last year’s race. This year, 
he is considering a different strategy. 

Bf “1 may try to run away from these guys in the first part of the 
race so they won’t be able to catch me,” he said. 



Borussia Gains 
Second Round 
In UEFA Cup 


lan Waldie/Rjnucn 

Borussia Dortmund's Stephane Chapuisat was sent sprawling by Motherwell’s Dougie Arnott, who was sent oft. 

IAAF to Stand Firm Against Krabbe Lawsuit 


Reuters 

BONN — The International 
Amateur Athletic Federation 
said Wednesday that it would 
stand firm against a lawsuit 
brought by Katrin Krabbe, who 
was banned for two years for 
taking drugs. 

Krabbe. the world 100- and 
200-meter champion in 1991. 
sued the German athletic asso- 
ciation and the IAAF last 
month for damages of up to 4 
millio n Deutsche marks ($2.6 
million). 

She is also asking the courts 
for an immediate end to the 
suspension, imposed by the 


IAAF in August 1993. after she 
and teammates Grit Breuer and 
ManueJa Derr admitted taking 
the banned drug clenbuterol in 
July 1992. 

But IAAF spokesman Chris 
Winner said: “Despite last 
year’s German federation rul- 
ing defending Miss Krabbe. she 
nonetheless did lake a four-year 
banned substance. 

“On that basis alone, the cur- 
rent two-year ban for bringing 
the sport into disrepute remains 
a sound decision, and one the 
IAAF will defend.” 

Krabbe has argued that the 
suspension is illegal under Ger- 


man law and would be regarded 
as too long by a civil court. 

Although it is a technicality, 
Krabbe is actually suspended 
for bringing the sport into dis- 
repute for taking drugs, rather 
than being banned for taking 
drugs. The technicality was im- 
plemented by the IAAF as a 
mechanism for banning her to 
get round complications with 
die German law. 

Krabbe is determined to 
make a comeback and will start 
serious training next month, her 
adviser Thors ten Heuser said 
Wednesday. 

“We are’ optimistic about the 


outcome of the conn case; oth- 
erwise we wouldn't have filed a 
suit,” said Heuser. 

Krabbe filed her suit on Aug. 
12. No date for the hearing has 
been set. 

Derr and Breuer, the 1991 
world 400-meter silver medal- 
ist, will join Krabbe in southern 
France for training, scheduled 
for the middle or end of Octo- 
ber. 

“Krabbe has been keeping fit 
but of course it’s not high-per- 
formance training, said 
Heuser. “Now she wants to 
know how she could fare at a 
high level.” 


Compiled by Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

MOTHERWELL. Scotland, 
— Karl-Heinz Riedle fired two' 
second-half goals in 10 minutes 
as Borussia Dortmund cruised 
to a 2-0 UEFA Cup victory on 
Wednesday to gain the second 
round on a 3-0 aggregate score. 

Already a goal up from the 
home leg, the 1993 runner-up 
had a boost when Dougie Ar- 
nou was sent off for his second 
cautionable offense in the 3 2d 
minute, leaving the home team 
short-handed for the rest of the 
game. Motherwell wound up 
with nine players on the field 
with four minutes to play when 
Rab Shannon was sent of for a 
foul in the 86th minute. 

Arnott, already booked for a 
16lh-minute foul on Stefan 
Freund, was expelled for taking 
down Stephane Chapuisat from 
behind. 

Riedle, one of the stars of 
Germany's World Cup triumph 
in 1990. fired his team ahead 
nine minutes afteT halftime on a 
pass from Chapuisat and added 
a second in the 64th minute. 

LONDON — Sampdoria 
could be without two key strik- 
ers when it tries to overturn a 3- 
2 deficit against Bodoe Gliml of 
Norway m the second leg of 
their European Cup Winners’ 
Cup first round on Thursday. 

Real Zaragoza's survival may 
hinge on away goals, the one 
scored by the Spanish team’s 
Argentine striker Juan Esnoider 
in Romania, as it seeks to recov- 
er from a 2-1 first-leg defeat to 
Gloria Bistrita. 

Sampdoria, the 1990 winner, 
is banking on Mauro Bertarelli 
— who scored their first goal in 
the Oslo match — recovering 
from a muscle injury. He was 
haring final fitness tests cm 
Wednesday. 

The Italians’ Swedish coach 
Sven -Goran Eriksson said that 
with Roberto Mancini also out, 
he had problems settling on a 


replacement if Bertarelli was 

not fit. 

“I don’t like talking too much 
about the people who can't play 
but when we are missing players 
up front, and one of them is 
called Manrini, then we’ve got 
problems.” 

Eriksson said Sampdoria had 
been unlucky in recent losses, 
inluding a IT) league defeat to 
Juvenius on Sunday. 

“We’re incapable of putting 
the ball in the net." he said. 
“The rest is all there and the 
team is in form.” 

Arsenal should find their 
home leg against Omonia Nico- 
sia a formality after winning 3-1 
in Cyprus with two goals from 
Paul Mersoo. 

Fellow Londoners Chelsea, 
who won the trophy way back 
in 1971 , win be glad of the cush- 
ion of a 4-2 lead over the Czech 
team Viktoria Zizk ov as Glenn 
Hod die takes his inexperienced 
young team deep into unknown 
territory in eastern Europe. 

The match is being played in 
the provincial town of Jobianec, 
around about 100 kilometers 
(60 miles) northeast of Prague. 
Zizkov's own ground in the cap- 
ital was ruled unfit by UEFA. 

An outbreak of influenza 
within Hoddle’s squad has hid 
low two of his best players, mid- 
fielders Gavin Peacock and Ni- 
gel Spademan. 

“We have to be careful how 
we treat it because of the prob- 
lem of banned drugs. At the 
moment it is just a question of 
rest,” the player-manager said. 

Tlie Scottish striker John 

r cer looks set to be the man 
misses out because of tK 
three foreigners’ rule, with 
Steve Clarke, another Scot, 
playing in defence. Hoddle will 
wait on a fitness check on Eng- 
lish defender Scott Minto be- 
fore deciding on his line-up. 

(A?, Reuters ) 


ft 


IT 


* 




% 




- A* 



SIDELINES 


Schumacher to Stay With Benetton 

BONN (AFP) — Michael Schumacher, the Formula One world 
championship leader, has pledged to stay with Benetton-Ford for 
the next season. 

Schumacher ended speculation that he might leave the team in 
an interview with the German car weekly. Auto Bild. 

“I will drive for Benetton throughout next year,” he said, 
adding that only a few minor details needed to be sorted out. 

Schumacher indicated earlier this month that he might leave 
Benetton, after being disqualified from one race and banned from 
the last two because of rule infringements. 

New Team Coif Contest Announced 

LONDON (AFP) — A new team tournament between top 
players from southern Africa and Australasia was unveiled on 
Wednesday. 

The Allred Dunhfll Challenge will be held every two years, 
starting in 1995, and will alternate between southern Africa and 
Australasia. The first event is scheduled for Johannesburg, begin- 
ning Feb. 23. . 

Two eight-man will contest the event — the first six on 
each wQLbe selected from their places in the world rankings. 

3 More Races Canceled in Australia 

• SYDNEY (Reuters) — Three more race meetings scheduled for 
the Brisbane area were canceled on Wednesday because of the 
mystery illness that has hit the sport. 


The state's racing-* minister Bob Gibbs ruled our racing on 
Saturday and Monday at three tracks surrounding the strictly 
quarantined stables where 14 thoroughbreds and a trainer have 
died in the past week. Gibbs said the situation would be reviewed 
every 24 hours, beginning Monday. 

Elsewhere, restrictions have been removed, allowing the free 
movement of horses for the first time since a ban was imposed 
across the southeast region of Queensland last Friday. 

Pakistan Looks Into Cricket Betting 

KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) — Pakistani cricket authorities 
hive decided to look into charges that members of the national 
te am have been betting on games involving them, cricket officials 
said Wednesday. 

But they said no formal inquiry was planned because the 
authorities did not give much credence to the charges, which they 
said were leveled by unidentified persons after Pakistan’s tour of 
Sri I-anfca last month. 

Maradona Decides Not to Sue FIFA 

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Diego Maradona has changed his 
mind and will not sue soccer's world governing body to get a 
reduction of bis 15-month suspension for violating drug policy. 

Maradona’s agent, Marcos Fran chi, also said an Argentine 
government appeal to FIFA was unsuccessful, the news agency 
Noticias Argendnas reported. Argentina’s secretary for sports, 
Livio Fomeris, will make another appeal to FIFA, world soccer’s 
governing body, when Maradona has completed half the suspen- 
sion, the agency said. 


CROSSWORD 


ACROSS 

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in God 

■ Tee off 

it Terrorist's 
weapon 
M Addled 
is Scout master? 
is Brief time 


it Forgiving 

country singer? 

is B.O- 

anno Lineament 

as Ruler measure 
si Ruth topper, 
1974 

23 Smith or Jones 
27 Sick country 
singer? 


JAL 

offers onward flights 
from Osaka 
to 21 destinations 
in Japan and Asia. 





33 Radii neighbors 

34 Dueling method 

35 Energy source 
37 Doubles learn 

member 

3S FU the shower 
wall 

41 Attention 

42 Rintstonos pet 
41 Seiko 

competitor 

4T Tired country 
singer? 

so Likes 

immediately 

si Put down 

04 Modem site of 
Bndent I Syria 

eo Cokee server 

si Comical 
country singer? 

S3 In the past 
« Ham it up 
or Bare 

•« Gaming 
currency? 

nSO’s TV sleuths 
Jonathan and 
Jennifer 

re Accouterment 


DOWN 

i Pedestal part 

a DOTS alma 
mater 

3 Spot in the 
ocean 

4 AiltD* 

sCincode — 
(Mexican 
holiday) 

• Height 

T Scenic-view 

spot 

• Purpose 

•From Z 

to Address tor a 

French tnend 


11 SALT 
participant 

12 Close fm on) 

13 Symbol 

ia Nosegay 

22 Bubble 
machine 

24 Dr. Dre’s 
specialty 

i maker 


s 

■ 

U 

U 

m 

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■ 

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■ 


■ 

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■ 

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HI 

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B 

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IB 

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i Laugh i 
Louis 


2« Declare 
27 Ewe said ill 
2S Mural starter 

» Bemoans 
20 Grazing site 

31 Practical 

32 Cobbled 

33 Mom's bra 

as Tex 

(cooking style) 

a* Minn, neighbor 

40 Palindromic 
preposition 

40 Mineral suffix 

«« Fraternity 
characters 

40 Pump numbers 
45 God. in 
Judaism 
40 Rheinland city 
51 Wharf 
S3 Press 

53 In the near 
future 

as Combo 
re way oft 

57 Microwave, in 
slang 

re Fateful day 
re Tags on 
•2 Singer Sumac 
sa Negative 

correlative 

54 Slant star 



Pnda Hr Rwfloiph *D“ 

€> /Yew York Tones/ Edited, by ffill Shnrtz. 


Solution lo Puzzle or SepL 28 
ismciKitas 


H00D 


nrnaa 

30313 



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■ElPlLHi 

Correction 

The following instructions were omitted from the 
puzzle printed in the IHT’s editions of SepL 28: The 
circled letters, reading in order from top to bottom, 
will reveal the makeup of the four unclued answers. 


TODAYS 


Appears 

on Page 13 


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THAI* YOU JESUS 4 SI JUDE 
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DM 


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\ 









ART BUCHWALD 


Medical Machinery 



TX7ASHINGT0N - Here’s 
7 " what they don’t tefl you 
JP 0 ™ kaUk care costs. Every 
scwMone invents a machine 
“ save people’s lives. Once it 
comes onto the market doctors 
Me obligated to use h. If they 
< ton*t, some nasty lawyer wiB ac- 
cuse them of malpractice. So the 
gwe the invention is used the 
Jugbo - the cost of medical care. 

For example, let’s look at the 
Dingerscope, a 
new nuclear 
camera that 
permits the 

physician to 
examine every 

part of the hu- 
man body 
fromacrouch- 
ingposition. 

This allows 

SS-lo'S B" 

whether a patient is lying on his 
stomach or his back. Once this 
has been established by the ma- 
chine, doctors are able to use 
the SO other machines at their 
disposal to treat patients. 

The cost of using the Din- 
gerscope is 514,000, which does 
not include a IS percent tip for 
the technician. 

□ 

Here's an example of what 
we’re talking about: 
Stephanie Stef^anini is 
l into the hospital for 
add indigestion. The 


medicine, costing $1.50, when 
Kristi Fischer, one of the resi- 
dents, tells him that the Din- 
gerscope has arrived. She sug- 
gests that they use it to establish 
xf there is any gas associated 
with the stomachache or not. 

“That’s a good idea,” the 
doctor says. “How long will it 
take to prepare the patient for 
the machine?” 

“Two days,” the resident tells 
him- “It's just a question of 
availability. There is quite a line 
ahead of us as this is a new 
machine and everyone has fall- 
en in love with it.” 


Europe 


Cwmhagwi 

CoauNSd 

1X1*1 

BHutfi 


OF OF 
21/70 17*2 
17/02 14/57 
28/79 12/52 
32/80 21/70 
23/73 21/70 

20 m 18*1 

18*4 II AZ 
19/0B 11 «2 
23/73 *4*7 
I4/S7 IMS 
22/71 20ZB0 
17/02 11/52 
14/67 12/53 
24/70 10/61 
10/04 11/52 
19*6 11/32 

11/82 ana 

2MB 18/04 
84/75 18*4 
22/71 17/62 
IB/88 11/82 
10/80 14/67 
24/76 16/50 
14/57 OHB 
iwaa io/5o 
24/75 17/62 
12/53 3/37 

22/71 22 m 
21/70 11/52 
10/66 11/52 
8/48 2/35 

26/77 17*2 
] 11/52 4/30 

12/53 6/43 
10160 0/48 
11*2 8/43 

20/70 17*2 
10*4 12*3 
10*4 0/48 

21/70 11*2 


pc 23/73 
Ml 10*4 

■ 26/70 

■ 31/88 

1 27/60 

pc 20/79 
sh 18*4 
pc IDAS 
pc 22/71 
■h 15*0 
I 26/77 
■h 18*4 
r 10*1 
pc 27/60 
■h 18*4 
po 22/71 
ah 1203 

• 27*0 

■ 24/76 
PC 23/73 
pc 20*8 
t 20/79 
po 20/79 
■ft 16/58 
pc I9/6B 

• 27*0 

pc 11*2 

l 25/77 
a 22/71 
c 10*0 

• 0/48 
■ft 28*2 
■ft 13*6 
pc 11*2 
pc 20*8 
aft 12*3 
pc 27*0 
pc 18*4 
tft 10*1 
po 22/71 


The doctor turns to die resi- 
dent and says, “Dr. Chris Spur- 
ney is in charge of the Dinger- 
scope. f^»ii him and ask him 
when we can come down." 

“Dr. Spumey is playing golf 
because it’s Wednesday. Dr. 
Jon Swerdloff is doing the Ding 
today." 

□ 

Meanwhile, Stephanie is be- 
coming more and more uncom- 
fortable and begs for fast relief. 

The doctor instructs the 
nurse to hold her down. 

“Mrs. Stefanini, my job as a 
physician is to use every piece 
of equipment in this hospital. 
Before the Ding appeared, you 
would been out of here in 20 
minutes. But since we have the 
machine it would be a betrayal 
of my Hippocratic Oath it I 
didn't put you under it." 

“I appreciate that. Doctor, 
but one Ding procedure and I 
will have blown my entire 
health insurance allowance for 
the next six years. Is there any 
occasion where a doctor can 
treat a patient without sending 
him down to the nuclear smash- 
er department?" 

The doctor says, “I have been 
practicing medicine for 30 years 
and I have never known the 
hospital to boy a machine and 
not use it day and night" 

□ 

The resident announced that 


anie was wheeled down into the 
lead-lined basement. 

Her head was inserted into an 
opening, her shoulders were 
strapped to a trolley, and her 

legs were placed around the soft 
drink machine. 

A technician entered the room 
and rubbed some ointment on 
Stephanie’s stomach. Then he 
signaled his assistant to pull the 
lever. Out of the side of the ma- 
chine came a piece of microfilm 
and a stick of bubble gum. The 
doctor read it and then handed 
Stephanie an Alka Seltzer. Her 
final bill was $25,000. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1994 


Fallen Quiz Whiz Still Longs for Revenge 


By Tom Dunkel 

Washington Post Sen ice 

N EW YORK — Honestly, isn’t 
outsmarting a precocious college 
kid one of life’s great pleasures? Ask 
Herb StempeL He knows. 

Last summer he and his wife were 
invited to the suburban New York 
City home of Julian Krainin, one of 
the producers of the new Robert Red- 
ford Elm “Quiz Show," so that the 
actor John Turturro could get a close- 
up fix on the character he’d be play- 
ing. Everybody was chatting amiably 
at the dinner table when Krainin’s son 
Todd suddenly' pitched a fastball 
question at Herb. 

He asked Stempel if be knew the 
longest word in the English language. 

Thirty-eight years ago Herbert Stem- 
pd racked up $50,000 in winnings and 
became one of television's most cele- 
brated quiz show contestants. Now 67. 
he regulariy watches “Jeopardy!” and 
figures he “approximately 85 per- 
cent” of the questions. 

Well, Stempd not only came up 
with fioc^na ndnfhili pihfication^ but 
tossed in the definition. “I said. 
That’s from Shakespeare,'” says 
StempeL “ Tt means the act of render- 
ing [something] as worthless.’ ” 

About 50 million people once had a 
lot of faith in StempeL That’s the size 
of the weeknight audience ‘Twenty- 
One" pulled at its peak in the mid- 
1950s. But in October 1959, after 
Stempd was off the show and the 
show was off the air, Stempel and 
dozens of other witnesses sat in front 
of a congressional subcommittee re- 
vealing the vast quiz show hoax. 

“Twenty-One,” “The $64,000 Ques- 
tion,” “Dotto” and most of their com- 
petitors turned out to.be rigged. 

“I was assigned to play the role of a 
nerd, a human computer,” says Stem- 
pcL “And 1 have to say] acted pretty 
wdL” Many “actors” tor* prear- 
ranged dives. Stempd testified mat he 
ended his six-week undefeated run by 
throwing a highly publicized face-off 
with challenger Charles Van Doren, a 
young Columbia University English 
instructor. Van Doren wound up king 
of the quiz show hill, ul tima tely earn- 
ing $129,000. 

After the two weeks of Washington 



hssz&z,- .* :r = . -■ ;:v.. ■ -■ ww ■ *&£ • R'dfiGSi 

Con Wdh Broun to The Waatapw tel; iattt AP 

Herb Stempel today, and at 1959 hearings Onset). 


hearings had conduded and 19 people 
had pleaded guilty to lying to the New 
York grand jury that first probed the 
scandal and were given suspended 
sentences, Stempel, in his words, “just 
went into the shadows and became 
Herbie Stempel, ex-quiz contestant” 

He still lives in Forest Hills, in an 
apartment he shares with his second 
wife, Ethel. The $50,000 in prize mon- 
ey disappeared in months, a good 
Chunk lost to a con artist who duped 
him into investing in a mythical Flori- 
da off-track betting scheme. 

Stempel earned a degree in history 
at age 30 from the City College of 
New York and jumping around a bit 
professionally. He worked as “an as- 
sistant office manager in a corpora- 


tion,” then taught public schooL In 
1984, Stempd was hired by the New 
York Department of Transportation’s 
litigation support uniL He spends his 
workdays in nearing rooms, fending 
off injury cl aims filed against the city. 

Stempel is mellower and leaner 
than when be appeared on “Twenty- 
One:’’ Yet the quiz show, affair has 
never fully receded into his past. He 
remains peeved about the way that 
d rama played out, about the nebbish 
role he was given. “Look,” he says, 
standing up. “You think Fm short and 
squat? Tm nearly six feet tall But 
every author, including people who 
have met me in the past, still describes 
me as “short and squat.’ ” 

Televised images can become indeli- 


ble. The formerly plump Stempel had 
the misfortune to be cast as a populist 
underdog by Dan Enright, the creator 
and producer of “Twenty-One.” Stem- 
pd had walked into Enright’s offices in 
September 1956 to take the 363-ques- 
tion qualifying test for the show. He 
walked out with the highest-ever score. 
251. At that time, Enright was running 
a straight game with disastrous results. 
Contestants were groping for answers, 
generally wrong ones. Stupidity is not 
telegenic so Enright made a proposi- 
tion: Since he knew most of the an- 
swers anyway, would Stempel mind a 
tittle coaching that would guarantee 
him big prize money and peahaps save 
Enright’s show? 

T agreed to be used, Fm not excul- 
pating myself or anything,” says Stem- 
pel [Enright] completely washed 
his hands and found himself a new guy, 
an all- American hero. ... I was just 
totally thrust aside.” 

The nexd-in-th e-street formula had 
worn thin. The “Twenty-One" ratings 
started dropping. Enright found a 
worthy successor to Stempd in the 
{£lib and polished Van Doren. 

Stempel didn’t' go quietly. He 
clam ed Enright reneged on promises 
to give him a consulting job, possibly 
his own panel stow. Feeling betrayed, 
be derided to blow the whistle on the 
quiz fixes. 

One minute Stempd casts his tak- 
ing on the quiz show powers as a noble 
act of self-destruction. The next he 
concedes that his motives were hardly 
altruistic. “For $250 a week, believe it 
or not, [Enright] could have bought 
my silence. Thai was the salary I was 
asking.” 

There is one patch of solid ground 
in S lempcTs psyche: Van Doren. His 
upper-class arch rival. Stempel 
doesn’t believe the best man won. In 
fact, he has this fantasy of someday 
squaring off against Van Doren in a 
squeaky-clean game of “Twenty- 
One.” 

Enright tried to get Stempd to swal- 
low Van Doren’s victory. The world 
is a cruel world,” he mused, “and fate 
plays a greater part in all such things ” 
Why isn’t life fair? That’s the (me 
question Herb Stempd may never be 
able to answer. 


WEATHER 


Forecast for Friday through Sunday, as provided by Aocu-Weather. 



torn Kong 
ton* 
towDaM 
Son/ 


Today 
MB* tow 

C/F C/F 
31*0 24/75 
23/73 13*5 
29*4 24/75 
31/88 25/77 
35*7 22/71 
22/71 10*1 
27/80 18*4 
31*8 25/77 
21/68 10*6 
24/76 21/70 


W Mgfl Low W 
OF OF 


SATURDAY 



PEOPLE 



honato Marry Again 
torn TVnmp, 45, says s he wi ll 
many her Itahan bean, Riccardo 
MaaweheHi, 51, in Mat*. Ai 


she says, because T had to ocf 
comfortable with the idea of get- 
ting married’’ after being 
“b urne d so badly” before in her 
marriage with Donald Trump. 

□ 

Sir John GWgod, 90, re- 
ceived the Sixth Praetmum Im- 
periale Theatre Prize, along 
with £97,500 ($153,500) in Lon- 
don. - . ■ Ptofessor Simon 
Donaldson of Oxford Universi- 
ty and Chinese-born Professor 
SUng-Tung Yau of Harvard 
University will share the 
$400,000 Crafoord Prize for 
tbrir work in geometry. 

Ergene Marsky, 19, of Tash- 
kent, Uzbekistan, won the 
World Piano Competition in 
London. The £10,000 prize was 
presented by Princess Diana 
just one day after Ricky Cofcarz, 
described as a former psychiat- 
ric patient, grabbed her in a 
scuffle with fans outside a Lon-, 
don m Trying college. Coltarz* " 

told The Sun tabloid: Td never 
have harmed her. I just wanted 
to talk to her about family val- 
ues, marital matters and the 
monarchy.” 

□ 

Jean-Mtebet Couve, the may- 
or of Samt-Tropez, called for a 
truce on Wednesday with Bri- 
gitte Bardot, who quit her home 
m the town this summer in a 
protest over fox-hunting. Couve 
said he would offer her the 
town’s services in her fight for 

anfmal rights. 

□ 

Sophia Loren, a target of Bar- 
dot for advertising furs, again 
drew the ire of animal rights 
activists when rite attended a 
show in Milan by the fur com- 
pany Annab els. Activists pro- 
tested with a sign reading ^So- 
phia, With Fur Coats You Have 
Won the Oscar for Cruelty." 


THIS WEEKEND AT THE BEACH 


SUNDAY 


North America 
The Great Lakes region 
through New England will 
have chilly weather this 
weekend, then mMer weath- 
er Monday. Locally heavy 
reins and gusty winds will 
develop along Urn central 
Gu8 Coast this weekend. A 
tow heavy thtmderatorms wfll 
also develop over the north- 
ern Pfa/ns. 

Middle East 


Europe 

Seandkisvla through north- 
western Russia will have 
drily weather this weekend. 
London through Paris and 
Munich will have sunny, 
pleasant weather this week- 
end • an excellent weekend 
lor many outdoor activities. 
The Atos w* also have dry, 
ptoasant w e a ther this week- 
end. 


Chilly weather will plunge 
southward through Beijing 
Surday Into Monday. Shang- 
hai w# have dry, seasonable 
weeftwr this weekend. Man- 
day will turn cooler with a 
lew showers, hi the mean- 
time, Typhoon Orchid will 
blast central Japan with high 
winds, mudslides and flood- 
hg rains Friday. 


CtpftTotm 


2or7D 'stiff arsons am • 

1 B*e 11*2 ■ 21/70 8/48 pc 
19*6 15S0 pc 22/71 14*7 pc 
20 *B 7/44 pc 22/71 9/48 • 

28*2 23/73 pc 77*4 24/75 pc 
E/71 10*0 pc 24/75 11*2 * 
31/88 20/68 PC 31/B8 20*8 a 


North America 

Mtcborafla 10/50 


Oceania 

AueMsnd 16*1 9/48 tfi 18*1 9«B pc 
8)«kwr »*» 7«4 pc 22m 12*3 a 


20*2 23/73 ■ 29*4 22m • 
28*2 19*6 a 30*6 18*4 • 
23/73 13*6 ■ 27/80 13*5 a 
23/73 18*1 ■ 36/79 18*1 a 
33*1 21/70 * 38/10017*2 • 
39/102 25/77 a 41/1QB24/7S 9 


Latin America 

Today Tomorrow 

Mgfl Low W Wgh Low W 
CtF Of Cff- Cff 
Bum* /tins 19*8 13*6 *1 21/70 8/48 pc 

Cocos 28*2 20*6 pc 27*0 20*6 pc 

U<W 18*4 16*9 pc 111*4 16*8 pc 

MmcoCay 23/73 1102 t 24/75 10*0 pc 

Kodohnmo 23/73 17*2 pc 24/75 19*8 pc 

Sirongp 19*8 8/46 a 21/70 7/44 pc 


Daunt 
HqooUu 
hhudon 
Log Angata 


Legend: S-sumy. pc-pa/9y cloudy. c-ctoudy. utvatiowea, l-flxjxtenjlofms, r-caK sl-anow fumes, 
sn-nnow. Wee, W-Weother. AB map*, tomcats and data provfcfad by Accu-WMher, tne. el 8B« 


10/50 l / 3 « 

2S/B2 15*8 

21/70 11*2 
3100 12/53 
30*6 9/40 

19*6 9/48 

32*9 24/75 
34/93 19 *6 
27/80 17*2 
31*8 23/73 
20*8 7/44 

16*1 8/46 

31*6 24/75 
20*6 12*3 
38/100 23/73 
19*5 13*5 
19*4 11*2 

18*1 9/48 

22/71 12*3 


Europe and Mddle East 








Location 

Weather 

High 

Low 

Water 

Wave 


Wind 



Temp. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

1 !■ frtrfs 

iKjgnui 


Spaed 



C/F 

OF 

OF 

(Metres) 


IN*) 

Cannes 

pertly sunny 

26/73 

16*4 

23/73 

1-2 

S 

w 

20-40 

Deauvile 

ckaids and swi 

20*6 

14*7 

14*7 

1-3 

s 


40-70 

Rimini 

partly sunny 

27/80 

16*4 

23/73 

0-1 

s 


1020 

Malaga 

sunny 

25/77 

16*4 

23/73 

0-1 

E 


8-16 

Cagliari 

sunny 

29/84 

22/71 

23/73 

D-1 

w 

f 

1222 

Faro 

- sunny — 

23/73- — 46/81 

20*6 

0-1 

N 

w 

1020- 

Piraeus 

partly stmy 

31/68 

21/70 

22/71 

0-1 

Wi 

r 

1020 

Corfu 

sunny 

30/B6 

21/70 

24/75 

0-1 

N 

w 

12-2S 

Brighton 

9howerB 

21/70 

12*3 

15/59 

2-3 

S 


3060 

Oshind 

cloudy 

19/56 

13*5 

14*7 

2-3 

a 

E 

3060 

Schevarungon 

doudt and Gun 

IB/66 

13*5 

15*9 

1-3 

a 

E 

25-50 

Syfi 

cloudy 

17*2 

11*2 

14*7 

24 

a 

E 

20-40 

Izmir 

lowers 

32/89 

21/70 

24/75 

1-2 

N 

W 

2040 

Tel Aviv 

clouds and sun 

27/80 

21/70 

27*0 

1-2 

VI 

F 

18-35 

Caribbean and West Atlantic 








Baibedos 

partly surny 

32*9 

23/73 

29*4 

1-2 

e 


2040 

Kingston 

pertly Bumy 

33*1 

22/71 

28*2 

1-3 

e 

SE 

2040 

St. Thomas 

showers 

33*1 

23/73 

2904 

1-2 

e 

SE 

25-45 

Ham Aon 

clouds end am 

14/57 

4/39 

28*2 

1-2 

SI 

E 

2040 

Asla/PacHIc 









PBnang 

partly sunny 

20*4 

24/75 

29*4 

0-1 

Si 

« 

10-20 

Phuket 

thunderstorms 

31*9 

24/75 

29*4 

0-1 

SI 

N 

15-25 

Bah 

sunny 

32*9 

22/71 

29*4 

0-1 

81 

N 

12-25 

Ceixi 

thunderstorms 

32*9 

24/75 

30*0 

0-1 

SI 

2 

1520 

Palm Beach. Aug 

sunny 

22/71 

12*3 

16*4 

1-2 

w 


1520 

Bay ol Islands. NZ 

cloudy 

16*1 

9/48 

15*9 

1-2 

w 


2040 

Shirahama 

showers 

26/79 

21/70 

27*0 

1-2 

SI 

2 

20-40 

Honolulu 

parity sunny 

32*9 

24/75 

27*0 

1-2 

Q 

<E 

2040 


Europe and Middle East 


Carnes 

DeeuvUe 

RJmrt 

Malaga 

caefrui 

Faro - ' - — 

Piraeus 

Corfu 

Brighton 

amend 

Schevenmgsn 

Sytl 

Izmir 

Tel Aviv 


sunny 

doumand swt 
partly sunny 
sunny 
sunny 
partly sunny 
sunny 
sunny 
showers 
showers 
clouds and sun 
showers 
clouds and sun 
clouds and swi 


Caribbean and WaatAUantie 

Baibados panhrsunny . 32/89 

Wnp«on pamy sunny 32*9 

SLTnomas portly sunny 33*1 

Hamtton sunny 14/ST 


Asia/PacHIc 

Penang 

Phuket 

8as 

Cebu 

Patn Beach. Aus. 
Bay ol Islands. NZ 
Shtrahama 
Honolulu 


partly sunny 31/88 
clouds and sun 32/89 
panlynmy 32/89 
munderetoBM 32/89 
cloudy 23/73 

clouds and EUi 16 /BI 
clouds and sun 27/80 
cloudy 31/88 


AI forecasts and data prauadf 
by Aocu-Wftalher, Inoe l&M * 


Wind 

Spaad 

(kph) 

W 12-25 

S 30-80 

S 10-20 

E 8-16 

W 12-22 

vt 12-22 

W 10-20 

NW 1020 

S 20-40 

E 2S<50 

S 15-30 

E 15-25 

NW 15-25 

WNW 20-40 


SE 20-40 
ESE 2*40 
ESE 20-40 
SE 15-30 


SW 12-25 
SW 15-30 
SW 1530 
SE 15-25 
NW 2035 
NW 12-25 
SW 2550 
ENE 20-35